Zach LaPerriere

Red Alder Epicormic Growth Bowl

Bowl measures 14 1/2" X 5" I wrote more in the caption, below...still learning about this gallery.

Red Alder Epicormic Growth Bowl
    • Joe Greiner
      How do you add the caption?
    • Rating:
      5/5,
      odie
      That ought to make a terrific salad bowl......nicely done, Zach. See you in the forums.....

      -----odie-----
    • Zach LaPerriere
      @Joe Greiner Hi Joe. The caption was in the section below the photo, but the strange thing is that we don't see the caption until clicking the "CAPTION" tab to the right of the "COMMENT" tab. I don't think most people post captions or look at them, but I'm a bit lost in the techie stuff here.
    There are no comments to display.
  • Album:
    Recent bowls
    Uploaded By:
    Zach LaPerriere
    Date:
    Sep 8, 2017
    View Count:
    267
    Comment Count:
    3

    EXIF Data

    File Size:
    857.2 KB
    Mime Type:
    image/jpeg
    Width:
    2398px
    Height:
    2398px
    Aperture:
    f/4.0
    Make:
    Canon
    Model:
    Canon EOS REBEL T3i
    Date / Time:
    2017:06:05 14:39:47
    Exposure Time:
    3/10 sec
    ISO Speed Rating:
    ISO 100
    Focal Length:
    20 mm
     

    Note: EXIF data is stored on valid file types when a photo is uploaded. The photo may have been manipulated since upload (rotated, flipped, cropped etc).

  • Probably not what I would want to call this bowl in a show...but I thought the community here would like to see an epicormic growth in a bowl.

    These are the "shoots" that cluster on some species, often on the uphill side of leaning trunks, usually on the sunny side. My forestry friends suggest it's a response to stress when trees grow these, and I can't really confirm or deny, though I've seen them on what appears to be very healthy mature trees.

    Epicormic growths...aka poor woodturner's burl!

    Red alder has white wood that turns red when cut while still green (alive). Usually in twice turned work the red is lost, but I enhanced the natural red by turning green and keeping it wet while exposed to sun for about a week. The color is fairly true in the image, a bit of an orange hue. Way more exciting than straight white!

    Enjoy your weekend, all.