Art Resin

Discussion in 'Newbie' started by Dave Fritz, May 10, 2017.

  1. Dave Fritz

    Dave Fritz

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    Does anyone use this as a finish on turned wood? Any other two part epoxy you use? West System 105 and 205?

    https://www.artresin.com/
     
  2. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I would use the 207 hardener if you need a clear finish. The 205 hardener you mentioned is for fast curing and it has a slightly yellowish color. Another reason to not use 205 is that its fast cure time doesn't allow sufficient time for bubbles to escape.

    If you want a crystal clear and hard finish, I would recommend clear InLace resin (it actually is the same product as Reichhold Polylite 32153-00 orthophthalic casting resin). It's main use is for making onyx and granite castings such as countertops. I have used InLace on numerous turnings for many years with great success. It isn't designed to be a finish, but I suppose that it would work for that if the wood is dry and stable.
     
  3. odie

    odie

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    Interesting, but........


    View: https://youtu.be/tz5yTgW8gpk?list=PL56BR0x4HHEFdpw55j8JqNKWH4o9qe17l


    ......it looks like it wouldn't work very well with turnings, specifically because it appears like it needs to be cured on a flat surface facing up.

    I'm having a difficult time focusing my memory this morning, but is it Moulthrup who used a slow spin on curing a finish on bowls.....? That may be the only way to make something like the "Art Resin" work.

    -----odie-----
     
  4. odie

    odie

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  5. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    odie, thanks for the video. I would like to have seen how he mounts the turnings to the slow motor for curing the epoxy. Anything on the forum about this?
     
  6. Hy Tran

    Hy Tran

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    One of my colleagues uses System Three epoxy to finish the insides of his goblets & mugs; I believe he uses the silvertip and the clear coat versions (a couple of hours to tack-free; 24-72 hours to full cure).

    After hand application, he puts it on a spare lathe at slow speed and walks away.

    Generally, the foot is still on the goblet, not completely parted off (he has extra chucks).

    He's been very happy with the System Three stuff, and has used adult beverages (small batch bourbons) with no strange aftertastes or visible deterioration of the finish.
     
  7. Gerald Lawrence

    Gerald Lawrence

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    Recent news was that the Moulthrop finish was starting to fail on some pieces. Do not remember where I saw this but think it was the older pieces.
     
  8. john lucas

    john lucas

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    The finish is failing on some Moulthrop pieces but it's not the epoxies fault. It's the wood preservative they use to stabilize the green wood. Boat builders use West System epoxy. My friend Ed Lewis in Chattanooga is an expert at using this on bowls. He uses a 10 rpm motor t spin the pieces while they are drying. I find other finishes easier to apply and I don't usually need totally waterproof. Right now I'm using mostly Miniwax Wipe on poly followed by the Beale buffing system. however I'm not looking for that super gloss finish and definitely don't want the paint on clear plastic looking kind of finish.
     

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