Bandsaw blade question.......

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by odie, Dec 10, 2012.

  1. odie

    odie

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    About a year ago, I purchased two Timberwolf band saw blades from Woodcraft. I've been experiencing some difficulties with these blades. Although the packaging is long gone, I've determined that both these blades are "positive claw" blades. I don't know what that means, but every once in awhile I've had these blades catch on the wood and stop the band saw. I'm thinking these are straight teeth with no "set".

    Would the better choice be an alternate set tooth configuration.

    The blades are 3/8 and 1/2 wide, 3tpi and 4tpi respectively.

    99.99 percent of my band saw use is simply to knock off the corners of bowl blanks in a circular cut. Most of the time these blades work perfectly, but when there's trouble, the catches occur and I usually have to remount the blade to the wheels several times before I can get the corners cut off a single bowl blank. I had this trouble again the other day on a piece of Goncalo Alves. Not every piece of Goncalo Alves was a problem, but this one sure was. I've used the band saw a half dozen times since the troublesome Goncalo Alves......and, it's been cutting well before and after that piece of wood.

    I'd like to order an alternate set 3tpi blade, if the positive claw configuration is not the best for this application......

    Input please......

    ooc
     
  2. Doug Stevens

    Doug Stevens

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  3. odie

    odie

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    OK, thanks for the link, Doug. I've been doing a little researching tonight, and it looks like 3/8" 3tpi alternate set is the way to go. I see these are .032" wide, and the Timberwolf is .025".....probably better.

    My only concern would be.......I cut bowl blanks from KD 8 percent MC, all the way up to a very wet 36 percent MC +/-. I would prefer to have one blade to do it all. So, would you recommend this blade for the whole spectrum of requirements?


    Another question, Doug.......Have you ever had trouble with bad welds, or bandsaw blades from this source not running perfectly true?


    ooc
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2012
  4. Doug Stevens

    Doug Stevens

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    Yes I would recommend it for use across the entire spectrum.

    doug
     
  5. odie

    odie

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    OK, thanks.....

    Another question, Doug.......Have you ever had trouble with bad welds, or bandsaw blades from this source not running perfectly true?

    ooc
     
  6. Doug Stevens

    Doug Stevens

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    Didn't see the second question.. :) I've never had any issues at all with these blades.. However I do as a matter of course when mounting a new blade, dress the blade with an abrasive stone across the back of the blade and on both sides behind the teeth to remove any potential rough spots. Might not be necessary but something I was taught as a child and kept doing. :)

    doug
     
  7. Greg Thomas

    Greg Thomas

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    bandsaw blades

    Odie, I can't answer your question, but I wondered if you knew that you can resharpen bandsaw blades. I learned the simple technique from Richard Raffan's Turning Wood. He has a short description of how he does it and a photo. He says he can get 10 sharpenings each blade. I usually get about three as I'm still working on developing a light touch. It does save some money and works. I'm pulling the book's name from memory, so someone correct me if it has another title.
     
  8. odie

    odie

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    Doug.....I just got through editing in the second question before you responded, so it probably wasn't there in the text you originally saw! :D

    I've never heard of dressing a bandsaw blade with a stone! Don't see where it could hurt, but have you ever had problems with "rough spots"?

    I've had plenty of problems, over the years, with bandsaw blades not running true.......blade oscillating in and out of the cut.

    ooc
     
  9. Doug Stevens

    Doug Stevens

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  10. odie

    odie

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    Hello Greg......Well, yes......I did know that. Band saw blades last me quite awhile, and I guess it just seemed like too much trouble to spend the effort, than to just replace the blade......or, I'm just feeling lazy about this! If I'm not using the correct blade to begin with, might as well not bother to sharpen these two Timberwolfs.......

    Matter of fact, I have Richard Raffan's Turning Wood book right here as I type. There is no appendix and no mention of band saw in the table of contents. I've scanned through the book but not located that information just yet.........got a page number?

    edit: OK, there is an index.....missed that. But, I don't see anything on the bandsaw. My copy of Raffan's book is second printing, April 1986......could sharpening band saw blades be in a later printing?????

    ooc
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2012
  11. Joe Greiner

    Joe Greiner

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    Dressing Blades

    Rough spots would indicate to me sloppy manufacture.

    The best reason for dressing the back of the blade is to round over the back edges for smoother curve-cutting, maybe even tighter radius. I also like to precede each cut by briefly holding a piece of wax candle against the sides of the running blade for lubrication.
     
  12. Doug Stevens

    Doug Stevens

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    Joe,

    Thanks for the clarification. BTW a shot of Pam will do the same thing as the wax.. quiets everything down and lubricates the cut and is vegetable based and doesn't accumulate on the blade guides.

    Doug.
     
  13. Greg Thomas

    Greg Thomas

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    sharpening bandsaw blades

    It's on page 39 in Turning Bowls, not Turning Wood.
     
  14. KellyDunn

    KellyDunn

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    Odie, I buy 250 feet rolls of 1/4 inch, I think 4 teeth per inch and I forget the rake but its agressive, and I make my own. I use a jig I got from some outfit years ago and silver solder the blades. My blades are 152 inches so its much cheaper to make my own. True you have to clean up the solder joint. And sometimes they break right off the bat. But why I answered this thread is your description sounds like dull blades. My blades dont last forever. If I am lucky I can saw round a truck load of blanks. Except when I wack a rock right off. When you have to start pushing and the cut is not straight you need a new blade. Or try to sharpen it. By straight I mean it deflects within the blank. It may feel sharp and work like a champ on 1 inch of wood, but try a ten inch thick blank and you burn within the cut and it deflects. Maybe not so much with as thick a blade as you are using. I may be scotch irish jewish feringi but I like sharp blades. A sharp blade is sweet to use and so less dangerous to that stuff we call skin and bone. Just my 2c. Oh, and when I do break a new blade I know the guy that can make it new again.
     
  15. odie

    odie

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    I get the idea, Doug.

    I have an old silicon carbide slip stone that I might use to round off the back side corners of my band saw blade, to test it out for improvement.

    Thanks

    ooc
     
  16. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Odie, the folks at Suffolk Machinery can answer all your questions and recommend the correct blade. Their number is (800) 234-7297. Here is some basic information on what blade to use: http://www.suffolkmachinery.com/important-info-vertical.html

    I think that perhaps the positive claw is more for resawing dry wood and for your purpose, an alternate set blade would be best. I suspect that the positive claw blade my be cutting rather aggressively in the green wood, loading up the gullets, and generating enough heat to pinch the blade in the kerf. Another possibility is that the blade is worn out or that the set is asymmetrical both of which lead to heat and binding.

    Also, you may already know this, but here are six rules on band sawing: http://www.suffolkmachinery.com/six-rules-of-sawing.html

    Make certain that the blades are not over-tensioned when using Timberwolf blades.
     
  17. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    By the way, Suffolk Machinery also recommends lubricating smaller blades with PAM -- the same stuff that is used in the kitchen to spray baking pans. Sometimes the wife comes to the shop to borrow my can of PAM when she runs out in the kitchen. It really is great stuff for lubricating a blade.

    In addition to rounding the back of a blade, I also polish the blade with metal polish before installing it. t is a very small thing, but it does make a noticeable difference. For blade guides, I often use hard oily tropical wood with zero clearance. This works well when the blade has been polished glassy smooth.
     
  18. odie

    odie

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    Aloha Kelly........

    I've been using the 1/2" blade for close to a year now......perhaps that one is not as sharp as it should be. (I am not a production turner, so the number of uses my band saw sees in the same period of time is probably much less than it is for you.) However, the 3/8" blade was taken out of the shrink wrap packaging only a couple weeks ago, even though I purchased this one at the same time as the other Timberwolf blade. It could be defective, but I suspect the "positive claw" tooth design is probably the source of the catches I've been having occasionally. The confusing part for me is the blade will run perfectly for a dozen bowl blanks, and then have multiple catches on one particular bowl block.......then, it'll run perfectly again for a number of subsequent bowl blanks........:confused:

    ooc
     
  19. odie

    odie

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    Bill, I'll check out your links tomorrow......got to get up early, so signing off for the night. This thread is getting interesting......and educational for me.

    Thanks to everyone who has responded thus far........:D......and looking forward to more input, if it's coming!

    Greg......yep, not the same Raffan book.....no wonder I couldn't find it!

    ooc
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2012
  20. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    A friend of mine is a production turner, and had used the Timberwolf blades for years. I was telling him about mine, Lennnox Diemaster bimetal blades. He tried one out, and now that is what he uses. I use the thicker blades because they take more abuse. I prefer half inch blades, and 3 tpi. These are made for resawing. The bi-metal means the blade is a softer metal, and the teeth are a harder metal. These can be sharpened many times, and I have it done at a local shop for a couple of bucks per blade. If you hit a nail with a bimetal blade, it will dull it down a bit but not stop it. Rocks, well, that is another matter. A 96 inch blade is just under $30, and my 150 inch by 1 1/4 inch blades are about $70. Worth every penny. I have never rounded over the backs of my blades. The thrust bearing seems to do that just fine. I asked my bandsaw guru about that and he said to NEVER do it. A 1/2 inch blade will cut a 3 inch radius fairly easily. Any bump on the back of a blade is a sigh of poor workmanship. I guess there are several brands of bimetal blades out there. I have heard of Ellis blades on another forum. If you live in a town of any size, and there is a saw shop, chances are they can make blades for you.

    robo hippy
     

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