Bandsaw blade question.......

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by odie, Dec 10, 2012.

  1. MichaelMouse

    MichaelMouse

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    Last edited: Jan 1, 2013
  2. Laurence Giglio

    Laurence Giglio

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    That is the basic method (I cant find the original video) The key difference in my method is that I hit more of the entire forward edge of each tooth. I also keep the blade on the BS, and I match the angle the tooth makes. Some teeth have gullets right facing some are left, not exactly every other one, sometimes they are two adjacent on one side, others its every other one. I mark the blade with a bold magic marker showing where I started. But I slowly go around, moving the blade with one hand holding the dremel locked in one position hitting lets say the RIGHT hand tilted teeth, THEN readjust the wrist, lock it and hit the left facing teeth. The video you showed he hit just the very end of the tooth and he didnt adjust the angle of the gullet.

    I do sort of pendulum motion, I move the dremel down the tooth back, slightly move my wrist to that side, with the other hand I turn the bandsaw wheel moving the next RIGHT facing tooth downward, letting the dremel hit that tooth, sort of like letting the dremel roll down the tooth back moving it away and advancing the next tooth on the same side continuing until I am back to the starting point.

    I then readjust the wrist for the LEFT side facing teeth, repeat and get back to the starting point. The top of each tooth should be shiny and then you know its done. For a 103 inch blade with 3 TPI, it takes about 5 minutes to do the blade. You can do two blades in the time to hear the studio version of Free Bird.

    I will look into the and blade set and see if that will work for BS blades.
     
  3. odie

    odie

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    Just a quick note to let those reading this thread know how things panned out.....

    The new band saw blades did help, but I was still getting some problems with very wet, hard and dense woods. I've always used 3-4 tpi band saw blades in the past for rough cutting, but I did have one old 6tpi blade.....and, decided to try that on one of the problem blanks. This was a success, but the blade was dull. I ordered a couple of new blades.......one 6 tpi, and one 8tpi.

    I haven't mounted the 8tpi blade yet, but the new 6tpi blade has worked perfectly on the most difficult of wet, hard and dense bowl blanks.

    The 6 tpi blade cuts slower, and is a finer cutting blade. I believe I'll switch over to this blade for use as needed........

    ooc
     
  4. Edward Weber

    Edward Weber

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    Glad to hear that you are getting better results.
    I do have to mention that back on page 3 of the thread, I cautioned you about using 3 tpi blades, they can be too aggressive for some wood species.
     
  5. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    One turner on another forum was having problems with his TW blades cutting red eucalyptus. Not going straight, etc. If you aren't familiar with the wood:imported for furniture making, too twisty for furniture, then tried to make railroad ties, and too twisty for that, so now is just a tree. Well, wanting some of the wood because it is one I had never turned, I traded a Lennox Diemaster bandsaw blade (1/2 x .035 x 3 tpi) for some wood. His comments were that it had no problems with the eucalyptus and cut faster. He also said the TW felt sharper out of the box. Now, to see how long it lasts compared to the TW. Really, they are the best blades out there for rough sawing bowl blanks. Really folks, in my opinion, the best bang for your bucks with resawing blades. Carbide tipped blades are for sawing fine veneers.

    robo hippy
     
  6. odie

    odie

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    Hi Edward.......indeed you did! .....and here is your post:

    I don't blame you for the "I told you so"! :D

    At the time, I was concentrating on other things I thought were the more likely solution. They were, to a degree, but not the "silver bullet" I was anticipating. :(

    ooc
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2013
  7. Edward Weber

    Edward Weber

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    I couldn't resist :D
     
  8. Steve Worcester

    Steve Worcester Admin Emeritus

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    I will say this, bandsaws don't always cut straight. There will be some drift. If you want to cut straight, draw a straight line in plywood with a straight side and cut the wood for about 18" and stop the saw and set the fence on the straight side.

    TPI is somewhat directly related to the thickness, 6 TPI would be wood around 2" thick (IMNSHO) if you are cutting thicker blanks, you don't care about tearout, go to 2 TPI of less. Now, the depth of the balde has a reflection on how straight it cuts, but more importantly the arc of the circle, thats where blade depth is related.
     
  9. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    Well, being too persnickety, the blades do not always cut square to the table or the fence. The blade should be able to cut a straight line though, and some blades will cut more of an arc. This is a tooth set problem. Like the guy cutting the eucalyptus, that particular wood made the TW blade cut in an arc where it didn't on most other woods. This might be a grain problem as he could not split the eucalyptus, it would chunk off rather than split. Some times having a too thin blade is part of the problem as well. Not having the blade tensioned properly also contributes. No matter how carefully I set the fence, it never seems to line up with the blade.

    robo hippy
     
  10. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    A bandsaw can cut fairly accurately but I never get the precision some folks do.

    I go through a whole set up regimen when I change blades.

    Open the guides,
    Mount the blade ( check twice to see the teeth are pointing down). :)
    Tension and track the blade.
    Check the table for square to the blade.
    Set the guides and back bearing a dollar bill width from the blade. If any guide touches it will Untrue the blade
    Then I use an 18 " long square board to set the fence like steve described.
    Blades rarely cut square to the table so I make a line a distance from the edge of the board.
    Cut that line about a foot. Hold the board to the table and bring the fence up to the board true edge and set it there.
    Continue the cut through the board.
    Then I take two more cuts through the board cutting a 1/8" slice off.
    The second slice I check with calipers. It should be the same thickness end to end as close as I can measure with my cheapie vernier calipers
    If not I reset the fence.

    I can then rip quite a few blanks against the fence. Quite accurately.

    Feed rate will affect the straightness of cut. Hard woods funky grain. Cut more slowly let the blade clear it's path.
    Push to fast and the blade moves around where it has not cut.

    Worn guides affect accuracy too.

    In the end a bandsaw is not a table saw.

    al
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2013
  11. Edward Weber

    Edward Weber

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    There are two schools of thought on aligning a band saw to cut straight.
    First is the previously mentioned align the fence to the blade drift.
    Second is align the blade (using the tracking) to the fence.
    Here is a link to a pdf that explains this
    http://www.ccwwa.org/NEWSITE/plans/BandsawTuneup1.pdf
     

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