Beginners articles or questions

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by john lucas, Jul 11, 2008.

  1. david demascal

    david demascal

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    a simple tip for sharpening that i use is slow speed grinder, light touch, keep small container of water handy to keep chisel cool and less blueing
     
  2. Ed Davidson

    Ed Davidson

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  3. Barbara Gill

    Barbara Gill

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    LOL, thanks Joe.
     
  4. Ron Sardo

    Ron Sardo Guest

    Uhm...take a look at the third post in this thread.
    While you are at it, check out the 7th post as well.
     
  5. RussFairfield

    RussFairfield

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    Where is everyone hiding? The woodturning world is flooded with stuff for the new woodturner.

    There are 25 years of back issues of the American Woodturner that is filled with how-to articles. All of them are available from the AAW. Many clubs have all of them in their library. If they don't, they should, and most likely there is a member who is willing to share. All the beginner has to do is check them out or ask. A 25 year index is available on the AAW website.

    There is at least one article for the beginner in every issue of the American Woodturner, and the editor is trying to have one pen article in every issue. You can't get more basic than 5-pages on how to glue a quarter to the bottom of a bowl or how to use sandpaper. The only problem here is that the Editor can't publish articles that have never been written.

    And, if you don't want to join the AAW, there is Woodturning Design available on the news-stands. I buy it at Wal-Mart, so it must be universally available. If you don't like that one, scan through any of the major woodworking magazines. They all have regular turning project and skill building articles, and some of them are pretty basic.

    There are group classes available at Woodcraft and Rockler stores. There are private classes available from a 5-page list in the Resource Directory. All you have to do is spend some money.

    There at least 9 other woodturning forums that I know of besides this one on the Internet. There are Internet libraries and personal websites that are filled with articles.

    There are several pages of videos and books available in every woodturning catalog, and there are many available privately from the Internet. Again in the Resource Directory, there is a 5 page listing of books and videos, and it is far from complete. If you don't want to buy, there is at least one rental agency available, and most clubs have a library of tapes and videos that are available for free.

    And then there are the local AAW chapters. Many of them are driving the long term members away with their emphasis on the new members and trying to keep them happy and coming back every month. Every chapter has a mentoring program, and most of them are never used because the beginner never asks.

    These are the facts of what is available for the taking, and there is no personal opinion expressed.
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2008
  6. Ron Sardo

    Ron Sardo Guest

    Those 9 other forums don't hide their articles behind a membership wall like AAW.
     
  7. Garmar

    Garmar

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    Ruth, sorry I misunderstood your post. As I stated earlier;a post by Rob Wallace seemed to me to be sensible and well thought out and I agreed with his suggestions. Then your post really confused me, now I understand. Barbara's post, however, has me stumped. Although I feel she was "coming to your defense" with her comments. That's how I will leave it.
    Again, read Rob Wallace's post and I think it will help you to understand my post.
    Also, I don't consider the posts suggesting I or others should look to other publications for our information; that's really the only reason I joined the AAW in the first place, great articles to help me get started. I don't have a Club or organization within a hundred miles of where I live so mentoring seems out of the question. I have to rely on excellent articles in the Journal I presently subscribe to and can't seem to wait for it to arrive.
     
  8. Ruth Niles

    Ruth Niles

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    :eek: you got me on that one, Ron. Now I'm as guilty as everyone else; I was being too lazy to see if the instructions I want are already on the website. Thanks for the nudge...........or was that a head slap? :D

    Ruth
     
  9. Angelo

    Angelo President Emeritus

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    Thank you Russ

    Good answer...
     
  10. jimbob91577

    jimbob91577

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    Suggestion

    My suggestion, for what its worth - start a blog. Blogger offers free blog sites in which you can post pictures, create posts (articles?), organize such articles, etc.

    You and 3 buddies can participate in posting content at what ever skill level you see fit, by having your 3 buddies be contributors to said blog. I understand the aspect of having the AAW host this information, but that may be something that the AAW board members and Web Staff don't want to undertake.

    If you're passionate enough about it, make it happen, and if your blog is informative and well organized, people will flock to it - I know I would.
     
  11. Mark Wollschlager

    Mark Wollschlager

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    Thanks Russ,
    I have been trying to write that same response to several of the threads here.
    Kept getting carried away.
    Just the facts is right.

    Mark
     
  12. Ron Sardo

    Ron Sardo Guest

    For you Ruth, it was a hug :)
     
  13. Barry Elder

    Barry Elder

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    Like you stated, Ron, unfortunately the AAW has the membership wall that intimidates many new turners. If all the 'beginner-type" articles were available to the general public, I think it could only have a positive effect on the future of woodturning.

    We have hundreds, if not thousands of extremely knowledgeable woodturners and wood artists, who could possibly write open articles aimed at people who don't know a skew from a bevel but are interested in learning. Most of us who have benefited from the mentors around us realize that woodturners are like a great big family and are among the most generous of skilled craftsmen and women. Whether it be about turning a bowl or world-class works of art, woodturning starts with very basic lessons and sometimes we forget where we started. Keep up the great work!:D
     
  14. Barbara Gill

    Barbara Gill

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    Why would someone be intimidated by being expected to join an organization to obtain the information that was published in their magazine? Certainly if they can afford to get into turning the $45 membership fee is not unreasonable. Gaining access to the membership area certainly is not a challenge; I do it. I always have advocated joining an organization that represents a profession or interest. I really don't think giving away information that is relatively expensive to assemble would affect the future of woodturning.

    Of course I don't agree with everything the AAW does. If we feel strongly about changing the way things are done then possibly positive action is the better action. Run for the board (not aimed at you Barry but at dissatisfied members in general), write articles, teach, join a club, lobby for change (nicely) be a good spokesman for turning, etc.

    I am sure there will be disagreement however I feel that part of the problem these days is the general feeling that we should be given what we want rather than have to work for it. If someone wants to learn how to turn then these small "obstacles" should not deter them at all. The amount of free information available right now is amazing. :)
     
  15. MichaelMouse

    MichaelMouse

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    The wall that forms between the woodturners and the wood artists, regardless who's laying the brick, is the one that counts most as I see it. The turners are the ones who seek information more than inspiration and discussions of art which almost invariably lead to disparaging craft as a lower form of expression.

    As I said above, including the sidebar(s) to show how to make the cut in either the way it was done, or in several ways for comparison, would both acknowledge that craft is the basis for the art, and those who are at the stage where they seek to improve their craft are members-in-full of the fellowship. Maybe then they could realize that they were not one tool away from proficiency, but one hour away from proficiency with the tool(s) they own.
     
  16. Jake Debski

    Jake Debski

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    Michael, absolutely. It would do everyone well to remember Woodartists were Woodturners first. But does not seeing what is possible "inspire" us to become proficent?
     
  17. Ron Sardo

    Ron Sardo Guest


    Ditto,

    Something that took me a couple of years to learn
     
  18. Ruth Niles

    Ruth Niles

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    MichaelMouse, who eats woodchips for breakfast (!), wrote these very wise words, "..... they were not one tool away from proficiency, but one hour away from proficiency with the tool(s) they own."

    hmmm, great T-shirt saying!

    I've advocated this theory way back when I was using a Craftsman mono-tube lathe and a set of Craftsman tools and doing juried craft shows to boot. "Real" woodturners used to say I couldn't do really good work on a junk lathe with cheap tools, I merely responded, "Gee, no one ever told me."

    One thing I don't think anyone has mentioned regarding what's available for beginners who are AAW members is that they can apply for a grant to take classes just about anywhere in the country.........or the world, if they want to pay part. *if I missed this being said, well, it was just said again.. :D

    Ruth
     
  19. john lucas

    john lucas

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    Very good Ruth, you get a gold star. The also get discounts on videos and books on the AAW site. they also get to stand up at meetings and Say, Hi I'm John Lucas and I'm a woodturner, and they all pat him on the back and understand why he doesn't have any money and the wife makes him sleep in the shop.
     
  20. Steve Worcester

    Steve Worcester Admin Emeritus

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    On that note, to some $45 is a deterrent. However, the $45 would also give them access to a bunch of articles that are timeless in the sense of the content in relationship to their skill level. I also assume they can get to the members only area.

    Anyone who approaches woodturning without the thought for the learning curve is in trouble.

    I don't agree. You must master the tools before you can progress, all of those who teach (well) know and understand that. Look at any wood "artist" and they had to learn technique, then form and shape. Most classes in a higher learning category (for lack of a better term) such as piercing, or carving or airbrushing, don't need to consider the former, but concentrate on taking you in a new direction or feeding the insatiable knowledge machine.I have talked to many artists (in this sense) who all absolutely love the sheer simplicity and beauty of a Dale Larson bowl or will always fall back to the subtlety of altering a curve slightly or narrowing or enlarging a foot and their affect on the visual properties of the piece.
     

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