Bottle Stopper finishes

Discussion in 'Newbie' started by Dave Kartzman, Jun 1, 2010.

  1. Dave Kartzman

    Dave Kartzman

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2009
    Messages:
    15
    Being a newbie, I am starting fairly small and am turning bottle stoppers (with both corks as well as stainless steel stoppers). I travel most weeks, on business, and bring them to the people I work with at the client site as a little something.

    I found some references to the types of finishes used on stoppers by searching through the forum archives. Most were 2006 and earlier.

    I was wondering if there has been any further discussion as to the types of finishes that would last longest. I have been using shellawax on my stoppers, but based on the remarks on the forum, I guess, the finish would not hold up very long.

    One of the forum participants mentioned he would test out multiple types of finishes and respond on the forum, but had not found any further comments.

    I have a couple of questions....(and I apologize for my naiety):

    1) Is Minwax wood hardener the same as a sander sealer?

    2) Do you think applying a sander sealer to the stopper first prior to the final coat and then applying a semi-gloss or gloss polyurethane coat would preserve the finish?

    3) I have read in the forum about using Mahoney's walnut finish or a straight walnut oil finish to the wood... wouldn't you need to put an additional hard coat on top of the walnut oil?

    I am working on small bowls now, and have ordered some books on finishing from Taunton press, so I hope I will find some answers there.

    Thanks a lot in advance... i am including a photo of some of the stoppers I have done recently. They are not of the quality of most I have seen out here, but I am happy with my progress (on these at least) so far.

    Dave
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Steve Worcester

    Steve Worcester Admin Emeritus

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2004
    Messages:
    2,629
    Location:
    Plano, Texas
    Home Page:
    You may want to talk with Ruth Niles, the "bottle stopper queen". She has a fantastic line of stainless toppers and can offer some advice

    www.torne-lignum.com
     
  3. MichaelMouse

    MichaelMouse

    Joined:
    May 16, 2005
    Messages:
    3,540
    1 - No

    2 - Sure, but why not use the finish itself, in a thinned coat.

    3 - Yes, if you were looking to have something to shine/shed a bit.
     
  4. Griesbach

    Griesbach

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2005
    Messages:
    391
    Location:
    Oshkosh, WI
    Dave, I try to avoid making stoppers too tall and it's also not easy to avoid making them all look like drawer pulls. If you look at Ruth Niles' web site you'll find lots of examples that can help you along. As for me, I finish them with wipe on poly.

    http://www.torne-lignum.com/
     
  5. Dave Kartzman

    Dave Kartzman

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2009
    Messages:
    15
    Thanks a lot for responding...

    There is such an abundance of good information out on these boards that it is pretty overwhelming when trying to figure out what I should be using.

    I try not to make the stoppers too tall. They look disproportional to me. Most of the ones in the photo are between 2 and 2 1/4 inches tall. I'm trying to get them closer to 2 inches.

    I buy my stainless steel stoppers from Ruth Niles and they are great. She has a great website with lots of sample stoppers.

    Again, I appreciate the help.

    Dave
     
  6. bsaks

    bsaks

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2010
    Messages:
    15
    Location:
    Ridgefield, WA
    Home Page:
    Dave, I do a lot of bottle stoppers and I use Behlen Woodturner’s Finish and really like it. I have also used some bees wax with it but it leaves a nice finish. Just follow the instructions on the bottle for the 50/50 delusion. I have also used this in 100% form on pens and it leaves a really nice finish.
     
  7. Mr. Don

    Mr. Don

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2006
    Messages:
    255
    Location:
    Gaston, Oregon
    Bottle Stoppers

    I use Min-Wax wipe-on poly on just about everything. Do not use it on Bocote and maybe some others....seems like Bocote has a wax/oil in it that reacts with the poly....doesn't dry completely and blisters. Not good. Have fun and do not use the metal stoppers other than stainless...they look nice for a bit, but will pit and then you and they will not look so nice!!:D:D:D
     
  8. john lucas

    john lucas

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2004
    Messages:
    5,823
    Location:
    Cookeville TN USA
    I use lacquer mixed 50/50 with lacquer thinner. Usually a couple of coats will do it but there is a technique for getting it to be glossy without streaks. That takes some practice. I usually apply a coat and then use a section of the cloth that just barely has any finish on it. I run the lathe at fast speeds and lightly buff it with this section followed by buffing with a clean section. If done properly it's almost like French polish except with lacquer.
    If I screw one up I use the Beal system to bring it back up. I don't like using the Carnauba wax. It makes them look great but they dull very quickly with handling.
     
  9. Barbara Gill

    Barbara Gill

    Joined:
    May 14, 2004
    Messages:
    445
    Location:
    Middlesex County, Virginia
    Home Page:
    I have used a penetrating oil followed by buffing for the last 8 years. A wine stopper should not get much abuse. About the only thing mine are subject to is putting in and taking out of the bottle.
     
  10. Ruth Niles

    Ruth Niles

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2005
    Messages:
    231
    Location:
    Newville, PA (south of Harrisburg)
    Home Page:
    "Bottle stopper Queen"!?!? ..... whoa, now that's something to live up to!!!

    Dave, my personal opinion, I don't put a gloss finish on stoppers. I use a penetrating oil, like Barbara does, then a paste wax. The more the stoppers are used they get a smoother feel to them. I also found the people like that they can revive the finish with a floor or car paste wax, even spray furniture wax.....if it ever needs reviving.

    I do like what John Lucas uses and am going to give it a try; sounds easy.

    Question for those using poly-wipe-on waxes: would they spot if the stopper were accidentally lain on a wet counter top? I've had people do that!
     
  11. Charlie Sandall

    Charlie Sandall

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2010
    Messages:
    4
    Location:
    Eastern Washington
    Ruth

    What type of penetrating oil due you like.

    Charlie
     
  12. John Brown

    John Brown

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2004
    Messages:
    32
    Location:
    Western PA
    Birchwood Casey Tru-Oil® Gun Stock Finish.
    Good for Bottle Stoppers, Pens, Pepper Mills, etc.
     
  13. Barbara Gill

    Barbara Gill

    Joined:
    May 14, 2004
    Messages:
    445
    Location:
    Middlesex County, Virginia
    Home Page:
    Hmmmmmmm B.S. Queen that is something to remember.:)
     
  14. john lucas

    john lucas

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2004
    Messages:
    5,823
    Location:
    Cookeville TN USA
    BS queen- now if you could just get Abba to sing it. :)
     
  15. Dan C.

    Dan C.

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2010
    Messages:
    18
    Location:
    Northwest Ohio
    Can't offer any suggestions, but just wanted to say that you're being awfully hard on yourself. I think the stoppers you posted look great. But hey, i'm a newb too...
     
  16. Dean Center

    Dean Center

    Joined:
    May 4, 2010
    Messages:
    455
    Location:
    Bozeman, MT
    I don't mean to steal the thread, but have a newbie question along this same line. Tru Oil seems to darken the wood a little. What do you use as a penetrating oil if you want to finish a lighter colored wood, something like holly, or a maple you don't want any darker? Thanks
    Dean
     
  17. John Brown

    John Brown

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2004
    Messages:
    32
    Location:
    Western PA
    I have never tried it on light colored wood.
    Jack
     
  18. Frank Kobilsek

    Frank Kobilsek

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2005
    Messages:
    286
    Location:
    Mendota IL
    Yep, Ruth is the Queen of Bottle Stoppers, somebody needs to take up that title and I can't think of anyone more deserving!

    My Favorite Stopper finish, lots of steps but quick.

    1) Sand to 600 or 800, I like Finkat paper in 600 and 800 grits.

    2) Seal with a diluted coat of Deft Brushing Laquer. Dry with clean paper towel with lathe at high RPM.

    3) Cut back with EEE, you can use the towel from Step 2.

    4) Wipe free of dust and excess EEE with towel damped with Laq thinner

    5) Finish with Mylands Friction polish

    6) Apply Briwax or Trewax and allow to dry while tapping the hole in the next blank. (On wood I am especially excited about I might use Ren wax at this step)

    7) Buff wax off with paper towel and lathe at medium RPM.

    8) Remove from lathe and mount on SS Niles hardware.


    If you set up the tools, supplies, etc just right you can turn and finish 5 to 8 quality units per hour. (Or at least that is my top speed)

    Frank
     
  19. -e-

    -e-

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2004
    Messages:
    173
    Location:
    starting today, on the far side of the moon
    Home Page:
    another alternative:

    krylon matt spray lacquer -- light coat, wait 24 hrs, buff to sheen you want.

    more water and alcohol resistant than penetrating finishes.
     
  20. Steve Doerr

    Steve Doerr

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2011
    Messages:
    38
    Location:
    Joplin, Missouri
    Is there a reason not to use CA on bottle stoppers? I have used it on a couple of the and it looks really good. I do know that if you have much detail on the stopper, CA will have a tendency to fill in those details. Other than that, is there something that I'm missing?
     

Share This Page