Bottom Feeder

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by Emiliano Achaval, Sep 9, 2017.

  1. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval

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    My old bottom feeder, ground to about 85, out of Ellsworth instructions, got too short to sharpen. I got a few new Thompson Tools today. Included a beautiful 3/4 bottom feeder... My old detail spindle gouge also got too short, got a new one, I like it when I jam chuck and reverse the bowl to do the bottom, also use it in my boxes for detail work... Doug mention a few professional turners, and their favorite bottom feeders, what they use for when the 60 won't rub anymore... I have found that with the years turning I can get a decent finish even with the 60, so when I'm rough turning I go all the way with the same gouge, but for finishing I switch for a better cut. Whats your favorite tool for the bottom, size and angle?
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2017
  2. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    I use 4 tools on a bowl.
    1/2 (5/8 dia) Ellsworth grind. Favorite one is the jamieson gouge by Thompson
    3/8 spindle gouge fingernail grind ( tenon. Beads, finish in the foot)
    1/4" Thompson gouge with a Michelson grind ( finishing the first 1-2" inside wall at the rim)
    Round nose scraper ( not too often - When figured grain won't cut cleanly)

    I rarely do bowl larger than 15d and almost all are wide than tall.
    I can make a bevel riding cut rim to bottom center with the Ellsworth grind.
     
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  3. john lucas

    john lucas

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    You can't beat a Hunter #5. You have roughly an 82 degree outside bevel but the cutting tip is ground and polished to roughly 30 degrees so you get super smooth cuts. Usually cleaner than you will get with a 40 degree gouge. I love that tool for turning the bottom of boxes and cleaning up steep sided bowl bottoms. Here is a video showing how I use the #4 which is simply a slightly larger cutter so they are used the same way.


    View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nfp2kvhH6Mo&t=4s
     
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  4. Dean Center

    Dean Center

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    I find I have better control on finishing cuts with a 3/8" bottom feeder. For hogging off the wood, it's a 5/8" gouge.
     
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  5. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    Well, I have several. I do like the Thompson fluteless gouges as you can roll them way up for a 70 degree plus shear cut. They have a ) shaped nose. Good for taking off no more than about a 1/16 inch kerf. I have a couple of spindle/detail gouges ground the same as the fluteless gouges. Good for taking off as much as a 1/8 inch kerf. I also have a couple of gouges with a round shaped flute, no U, V. or parabolic shapes. Also ground to a 70 degree bevel, and the same nose profile. 60 degree bevels work, but most of the time I prefer the 70, probably more because of the handle angle is easier to work with, and not because that bevel cuts any better. Now, I am playing with the burnished burrs on the fluteless gouges, a very light burnish, not a heavy burr, but very sharp.

    robo hippy
     
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  6. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval

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    Very interesting tool choice. Great video. Problem is my new bottom feeder 3/4 bowl gouge will never need replacement tips, lol. John, do you know there are still some turners that say carbides dont cut? I have the Jamieson hollowing system with the 6mm carbide. I'm a believer now! Also, a club member made me a copy of the Hunter number 1 and number 3 I think. I do use them for my boxes. But, I still prefer the gouge for bowls...
     
  7. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval

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    I have to say, never seen one fluteless gouge... Will have to look into it... Thanks Robo!!
     
  8. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval

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    Its fun to see how many different ways to make a bowl there are... I do tell beginners that all they need is a bowl gouge with an Ellsworth grind, you can do a whole bowl with just that tool. It's one my demos, how to turn a bowl with just one tool.
     
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  9. john lucas

    john lucas

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    I do turn a bowl with one tool but it sure is fun to have the other tools to play with and learn from. Just as an experiment for me I turned a bowl with the Hunter Hercules as my only tool. Rough it out using it as a scraper. Clean up the shape and tearout using it as a bevel rubbing tool. The use it as a shear scraper for those few less than perfect cuts. Even cut the tenon with it. I still prefer my bowl gouge but it's mostly because I have 30 years using that tool and it's the most comfortable.
     
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  10. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    Emelliano,.here is a clip I did a few years back on the fluteless gouge.


    View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=suRxCxdMn4k


    As for the swept back gouges, I never use them any more, at all. I don't care for the 60 degree bevel, and when it comes to shear scraping, I use my scrapers. The thing with the 60 degree bevel, for roughing, that angle is just too blunt. It works for finish cuts, especially inside the bowl, but I prefer the 45/45 (rather than the 40/40) for any convex surface. Just feels better, which I guess could also be said, it cuts with less pressure. I think that is how Stuart Batty says it. Part of this could be because I hold my tools more level when cutting rather than dropping the handle. I still prefer that 45/45 on the inside till I can't round it through the transition, then switch to a BOB tool. Going down the sides with a 60 degree bevel just doesn't feel right any more, and I do try it from time to time.

    robo hippy
     
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  11. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval

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    Thank you Robo, I really apreciate you taking the time to answer. I'm going to watch the video, then, probably make a comment. Aloha
     
  12. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval

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    Yet another tool that I have to go a look it up to know what it is, interesting name, Hercules! The idea behind my demo of making a bowl with just one tool is so beginners can see that they dont need to buy all the tools that I have! You are right, its fun to use other tools too. Like George Strait says, he's never seen a hearse with a luggage rack..
     
  13. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval

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    Here is my comment, lol. Robo, I feel much better about owning a lot of tools right now! I think you have me beat! Great explanation of the fluteless type of tools. Thank you.
     
  14. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Robo mentioned the skewchigouge ... I bought one many years ago and it's somewhere in my shop sitting unused after giving me fits. Maybe I'll give it one more chance before converting a into something useful. :D
     
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  15. Fred Belknap

    Fred Belknap

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    Robo liked your video. I have one of the Thompson fluteless gouges and use it to flatten the bottom of bowls after reversing and putting on a vacuum chuck. I have been using it without a handle. Now I plan on giving it a few more uses, might even make a handle for it.
     
  16. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    I did look at one skewchigouge, and if memory is correct, it was pretty small, like 3/8 inch max. I believe it was intended to be used like a detail tool, kind of like what I did with the one small fluteless gouge. The fluteless gouges work very well with a small burnished burr, which I am finding many uses for.

    robo hippy
     
  17. Gerald Lawrence

    Gerald Lawrence

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    I have a skewchigouge and when I started turning it was the only way I could get a good bead. Gets fewer catches. Will have to watch that video again.
     
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