Bowl Gouge Flute Shapes

Discussion in 'Newbie' started by Ed Nygard, Oct 4, 2017.

  1. Ed Nygard

    Ed Nygard

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    Bowl gouge flutes are variously labeled “V-shaped”, “U-shaped”, “Parabolic-shaped”, and “Compromise-shaped”, etc. I’d be interested in users’ experience with the different styles of flute and what makes any one more suitable for a given type of turning. This is closely related to the different possible grinds, which should be considered as well in responding. Thank you.
     
  2. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    There are some recent threads discussing this topic. I believe that the answer is personal preference. Everybody has a reason that they like a particular flute shape. However, different flute shapes can fill a need for a particular purpose such as a "bottom feeder" or hogging out wood or shear cutting. Personally, I don't like the narrow V flutes nor the broad U flutes, but that's just me and my two cents.
     
  3. john lucas

    john lucas

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    I love my V shaped Thompson. I also have an older HSS tool that has a deep wide flute. I like it for certain pull cuts because the way I sharpen it the "wings" are very thin and super sharp. Flute shape is a discussion that can go on forever. I think basically it's the shape you use the most. That's the one you learn to use and sharpen and consequently like the best.
     
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  4. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    Flute shapes become important for certain grinds and certain cuts.
    Flute shape is less important if you don’t use a grind or cut tha works better with a particular flute.

    I like the parabolic flute or the super flute for the Ellsworth grind and find it produces a better profile and more usable edge.
    I use a shear cut with the leading edge of the wing. This cut is easy for me with a parabolic flute. Really challenging with a fee flute.

    Vee flutes are nice for pull cuts and peeling cuts which use only the wing.

    My favorite gouge has become the Jamieson mae by Thompson.
    The flute takes the Elsworthnquite nicely.
    I also have a Thompson Vee I just use for roughing and for some pull cuts this gouge is just too point for me.
    I also have a bunch of Henry Taylor gouges and a crown with thenparabolic flute.
     
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  5. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    I tend to hold my gouges more level for finish cuts as opposed to the dropped handle cuts that many use. For my style, the more open flutes like the U and parabolic work better for me because they give the nose a bigger sweet spot. I don't use a swept back grind at all any more. I use scrapers for all of my roughing cuts, and for all of my shear scraping. My go to scraper is a Big Ugly tool that is 1 inch wide and 3/8 thick. I can easily stall my 3 hp Robust with it. I am a bit of a brute... I did try the V from Glaser long time ago, and it was way too deep of a V and plugged up a lot. Doug's V is more open than the Glaser.

    robo hippy
     
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