Bowl / Hollow Form steady rest

Discussion in 'Newbie' started by Mark Hepburn, Apr 22, 2014.

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  1. Mark Hepburn

    Mark Hepburn

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    Sorry if this is an old, worn out question but I'm not seeing many answers in the old threads:

    Can anyone recommend a good method to steady a hollow form for my Jet 1642? I'm turning an item (and plan to turn more) about 16" long or deep, with diameters ranging from 6 to 9 inches.

    I looked at the Oneway, which is the two-wheel setup and while they're listed on Amazon and elsewhere for a number of lathes, I don't see the Jet. And I wonder how well it works as it only hugs one side (on the other hand it is a Oneway product).

    There is also the Carter multi rest but it's nearly $400!

    Amazon also lists a product called the RMWoodco rest. Here's a photo:

    41ROYNEd0WL._AA160_.jpg

    I'm sure I can make one and have looked around at lots of plans, but in truth I'd rather be turning than making jigs.

    Can anyone recommend something? I expect to do quite a few projects over time so your comments would be a great help.

    Thanks,

    Mark
     
  2. Jerry Bailey

    Jerry Bailey

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    I have the Carter Multi Rest, and bought an extra wheel/support so that I have 4 total holding points
    have used it 1/2 dozen times so far and am very happy with the system.
    It has resolved all fears I had about turning interiors of longer pieces and have so far turned insides of 11" with no issues
    The bottom is completely adjustable, so presume it will work with any lathe that has a "track" type bed.

    As you say, it's a tad more expensive, but I also believe the old adage, you get what you pay for .........
    I'll spend extra $ in beginning, just to save frustration of having to buy better quality later on when original purchase doesn't meet expectations .....
     
  3. Mark Hepburn

    Mark Hepburn

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    Thanks Jerry,

    I do agree with you that you get what you pay for and by golly, we certainly can expect to pay for the privilege of turning, can't we? And I confess that the Carter caught my eye for sure. And if I turn a hundred forms, that's only 4 bucks per item. :D

    11" diameter is probably on the max end of what I would be interested in for the Jet. Where did you get yours (I'm thinking about that extra wheel too).

    Mark
     
  4. Jerry Bailey

    Jerry Bailey

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    Breaking down into how many forms you do is a perfect way of determining overall price and value, I never even thought about it that way ;)
    and the 11" is depth , I did a vase out of Sumac that was 5" diameter and 11" deep/tall , without the Carter, I would never consider turning a vessel that deep .......

    I got mine thru Craft USA, had a bunch of frequent buyer points saved up, so was a steal for me (got it all @ almost 1/2 price)

    Carter Multi Rest:
    http://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/p/6/1/25/110/-/5748/Carter-MultiRest-Work-Support-System

    Carter MultiRest Support Arm:
    http://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/p/6/1/25/110/-/5749/Carter-MultiRest-Support-Arm

    I too had thought about making my own, have seen several different plans out there
    but also wanted to just turn instead, and the Carter has a warranty, whereas a home made one doesn't ;)
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2014
  5. Mark Hepburn

    Mark Hepburn

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    Yep, amortization is a great rationalization tool. If I hit 1000 forms, then that's only .40 each.

    I just used up every last frequent buyer point I had at Craft Supplies :-( . Got the Malcolm Tibbets book, among other things. Well I may have to bite the bullet...

    And about that home warranty. I absolutely guarantee that if it breaks, I'll have to repair it. I stand by my work for myself.:D


    Thanks again,

    Mark
     
  6. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    The math is more like. :)
    Sell one HF for $500 and it is paid for.......
    :)
     
  7. Mark Hepburn

    Mark Hepburn

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    :D

    My work is so good that my family will take it all ---- for free. But I get I couldn't get a dollar for my work now.

    But yes, one of these days.
     
  8. Lee Tourtelotte

    Lee Tourtelotte

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    Steady Rest -- Home Made Version

    Hi Mark -- Looks like you are already leaning towards buying one of the several very well made steady rests. However, if you are looking for a good ($ money saving) plan, there is an excellent one, made of Baltic Birch plywood, in an article by David Campbell that appeared in the fall 2009, Issue #23, Woodturning Design magazine, page 66 to 71. I built one that is 12" diameter from that plan and it is rock solid.
    I now use it regularly and enjoy the fact that it is every bit as "steady" as the commercial versions I had looked at. My total out of pocket cost was less than $25., including the nylon, ball bearing wheels that I picked up for $4.00 at a garage sale, from some once very expensive roller blade skates. It was a fun, quick & easy project that ended well for me. Several of my MN woodturning club friends used the same article to build theirs with similar success. Woodturning Design is a great magazine and they can provide back issues for project referenced articles at minimum cost. You will enjoy the convenience of owning a rest, no matter which way you decide to go.

    Lee Tourtelotte
    Minnesota Woodturners Assoc.
    www.mnwoodturners.com
     
  9. john lucas

    john lucas

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    Do a couple of google searches for wood lathe steady rest, homemade steady rest, steady rest. It will bring up a bunch of good solutions that others have built
     
  10. Mark Hepburn

    Mark Hepburn

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    Hi Lee. Thanks for the info. If I'm to bite the bullet I'd rather be sure before I do. I just ordered the back issue. So for less than ten bucks for a magazine I may be able to make one. I don't mind spending a few hours on a money-saving project right now. And since I actually have some old -good - skate wheels and half a sheet of birch collecting dust I my be in business.

    But I really do like that carter :D

    And I had no idea the magazine existed. Just subscribed so many thanks for pointing me there!
     
  11. Mark Hepburn

    Mark Hepburn

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    Thanks John. I will do that. I did a search but just browsed images. I ordered a back issue Lee suggested and going to check that out also.

    I was almost dead set on buying the carter that Jerry has. But having just gotten a new lathe and chuck am hesitant to keep spending. Hopefully I can learn to turn to earn since it looks like I'm squandering my retirement!

    :)
     
  12. Douglas Ladendorf

    Douglas Ladendorf

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    Keeping an eye on what you choose Mark. I may make one at some point.
     
  13. Mark Hepburn

    Mark Hepburn

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    I'll be sure to follow up when I figure it out :)
     
  14. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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  15. Mark Hepburn

    Mark Hepburn

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    Bill, thank you for the link. So without really thinking this through, it seems that one could drill holes for the arms, fab some arms and a base and be done with the building?

    Basic jig hardware might work. I wonder if some T-track, cut to length would work for the arms with T nuts and knobs to hold the arms in place on the ring?
     
  16. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    It helps if you can weld or know somebody who does. The ideal way to do it is to saw off a slice of the flange so that the inner hole will just touch the top of the bed. Weld the cut part to a flat plate that sits on the lathe bed. Have another piece on the bottom the plate that fits snugly between the ways. drill a hole for a bolt and clamping plate that goes underneath the ways. Weld or bolt three or four guides to the flange equally spaced around the perimeter. They could be made from square tubular stock. have square bars that fit inside the square tubes. Of course there are various other schemes for making the arms. There is a guy on Sawmill Creek that built one like this nd hs detailed plans. I will try to locate the source of that information.
     
  17. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Here it is

    I found the article. The original design was done by Jeff Nicol. Here is a recent thread by Jim Underwood who posted pictures of the process as he built one.

    James Combs is the person who built a steady rest similar to the Jeff Nicol design and then shortly after that provided a very detailed documentation. First, this thread shows the steady rest that James Combs designed along with some useful information about building it.

    Finally, the zip file that contains the PDF document is linked in post #21 of this thread. I linked directly to the post since the first 20 posts are mostly extraneous mish-mash. Just click save file when the dialog asks what you want to do. Go to the location where the zip file is saved and double click it. Choose where to extract the PDF file. Once the file has been extracted, open read and enjoy.

    I thought about building one like this, but wound up getting the one from Robust since it fits my Robust American Beauty lathe and is very very heavy duty.
     
  18. Mark Hepburn

    Mark Hepburn

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    Bill. Thank you for the info! As it happens, I know at least six people who weld and some for a living. In fact, one of them asked me this morning if I could turn a bat for his nephew.

    The town I live in is a significant oilfield support hub and I could almost throw a rock anywhere and hit a fab shop or ship yard. Three or four feet of square tubing is a scrap.

    So it looks as though if I go this route I may end up getting a free rest in exchange for a bowl or vase for someone's wife. And a bat for a buddy's nephew. And turning instead of jig building :-D
     
  19. Mark Hepburn

    Mark Hepburn

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    Link to plans

    Bill, I'm not a member of sawmill creek and didn't have access to pics or downloads, but your details helped me find the .pdf elsewhere. It's a 20 page illustrated guide. Very we'll done if anyone else is interested. Here's the link:

    www.tnvalleywoodclub.org/plans/Steadyrest by JDC.pdf

    Looks very promising.
     
  20. Gerald Lawrence

    Gerald Lawrence

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    Plywood

    I made one in plywood and works fine just a pain when doing spindles to move from one side of banjo to other.
    Right now sitting in friends den in Thibodeaux. Wish I had the metal access there is down here. But I do not use the steady that much and could not justify a lot of expense. The used skate wheels work well and were not difficult to find.
    Good luck
     

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