Bowl steady tips?

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by Zach LaPerriere, Jan 23, 2017.

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  1. john lucas

    john lucas

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    I don't have a photo of the Flying Buttress. What I did was take a piece of cardboard and cut it so it roughly matched the outside of the bowl and was long enough to touch the chuck. When I got the shape right I cut it out of 1/4 plywood and then hot glued it to the bowl in 4 locations.
     
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  2. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    It sounds like an elegant solution although I can't quite picture it in my mind. My brain seems be stuck on Gothic architecture.

    image.jpeg
     
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  3. charlie knighton

    charlie knighton

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    There are Turner's out there that we have never heard of and their work is definitely area 51.
     
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  4. odie

    odie

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    Clifton.......Say, that is an excellent idea with the laser attached to your lamp. I've got to try this myself......thanks.
    ko
     
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  5. odie

    odie

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    Exactly right, Clifton.......There is such a thing as too high an rpm that is also without vibration, and this may vary between preferences of one turner and the next. Thanks for pointing that out. (great Kenny Rogers quote, BTW! :D) For me, I do not go above the 1200 rpm belt setting on the pulleys while using the Oneway bowl steady......and more times than not, I find the best vibration free rpm to be somewhere around 750-1000 rpm.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2017
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  6. odie

    odie

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    .....and, your "bead weaving illusion" pieces are beautiful, Justin. :D

    I have had some fairly small bowls and platters that have benefited from using the OBS (Oneway Bowl Steady), so I don't think I could make the same blanket statement that the extra support is unnecessary. It's true that some do not require the extra support, but some do. I've come to the point that I automatically use the OBS, because it's easier to just throw it on there than run a test to see if it's helping, or not. There is no down side to having the OBS installed if it turns out that it didn't help......:)
     
  7. odie

    odie

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    There are a number of improvements that can be done to the OBS, and adding a spring to the scissor arms has been an important one. Most bowls are not perfectly round, and if the wheels are locked down, it can be worse than not using the OBS. The spring introduces some additional give-and-take to it, beyond what is available with the cushioning effect of the rubber wheels themselves.

    I've also added a wing nut to the scissor locking mechanism.....for ease of use. (I have done a number of alterations that allow me to do all the OBS adjustments without tools......this is a great help, and I'll provide photos and explanations of a few more of these modifications with subsequent posts. :D)

    You'll notice the wing nut has some pieces of red 1/4" air line attached to the wings, and a couple of nuts locked to the end of the bolt threads. This allows the wing nut to be opened fully, allowing freedom of movement to the scissor arms. The red airline on the wings catches on the flats of the nuts when I don't intend to lock down the wheels. Therefore, I have the option of not locking down the wheels when I intend to use spring pressure on the wheels......or to lock them down when the bowl is fairly close to perfectly geometrically round.

    IMG_2517.JPG
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2017
  8. Fred Belknap

    Fred Belknap

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    Odie where you use a spring I use a rubber band. I do mostly natural edge bowls so the OW Steady doesn't work to well with them. NE bowls don't vibrate much.
     
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  9. odie

    odie

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    Fred......

    I'm sure not every turner can use my ideas, but I'm equally sure that a few will.

    The rubber band should work......as long as it has an equivalent "springy" to it as the spring does! :D

    .
     
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  10. Clifton C

    Clifton C

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    Odie, from your "Useful shop gadgets" thread almost two years ago, my post #222 and your post # 223. It is interesting the things that work and stick around...
     
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  11. Zach LaPerriere

    Zach LaPerriere

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    Odie,

    I love your improvements. And thank you for taking the time to share your pictures and thoughts. I've studied your bowl rest pictures before, but now the spring makes sense! I didn't clue into leaving the wheels under spring tension but not locked down. That makes so much, and addresses one of my biggest gripes with the rest.
     
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  12. odie

    odie

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    Well now, Clifton.......I thought your suggestion was completely new to me! In my "old age" I've noticed my memory isn't as good as it used to be.......senility, I suppose! o_O I do remember when I was using the laser jig (It's still there in the photograph......right next to the bore light......and, I still use it for another purpose where it works superbly!) Since my post of a few years ago, I've added the bore light, and am finding that it's a better indicator of vibration than the laser pointer jig was. I am going to try out your suggestion of the laser to see if it is better than the bore light.....and, I suspect it might be.

    Thank you for your attention to the details! :D

    .
     
  13. odie

    odie

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    Thanks, Zach.......You know, there is a point where a bowl can be so out of round, that using the spring (or locking down the wheels, for that matter) will be an exercise in futility! In other words.....these improvements are only good within their own limitations. I am writing down a few more points as we go, and I'm going to bring them up for discussion later in this thread........For now, I've got other things to do with my life, so check back later alligator! :D

    .
     
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  14. odie

    odie

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    As I mentioned in a previous post, all the manual adjustments on my Oneway Bowl Steady (OBS) have been modified to be done without tools. For those of you who are using an OBS, this will make your experience much more user friendly, and those manual adjustments are now quick and hassle free.:D


    As I mentioned before, the scissor arm lock nut has been replaced with a wing nut. This wing nut, as previously explained, can be either locked down when you want the scissor arms to be rigid......or, can be held open when you want freedom of movement of the scissor arms, during those times you wish to use the spring pressure against the roller wheels.
    adjustable controls (2).jpg

    For the adjustable scissor arm mount assembly attachment to the upright post, I've replaced the lock nut with an extended "T" handle. This was made with a couple pieces of steel brazed together, and then brazed to the mount bolt using my acetylene torch. It's covered with foam and hockey tape to be easy on my hands during multiple adjustments.:cool:
    adjustable controls (1).jpg

    For the height adjustment, I used a piece of plastic tubing from an old vacuum cleaner (which just happened to be the right internal diameter!), and is covered with red hockey tape. The scissor arm assembly rests on top of the tube and the height adjustment is maintained permanently.....thus, allowing it to swivel, making all lateral adjustments quick and easy. The plastic tube is adjustable in height according to the height of the spindle over the lathe bed, via a quick adjustable hose clamp (yellow plastic handle). This might be handy for those using more than one lathe, but for me (who only has a single lathe), it's pretty much a permanent height adjustment. Allowing the scissor arm assembly to pivot on the upright post without changing the height adjustment is a great improvement over what the engineers at Oneway had in mind with the OBS, as it came from the factory. It eliminates the requirement of doing two separate adjustments with a single locking nut.....thus has been converted to a much more user friendly single adjustment.:D
    adjustable controls (3).jpg
    Note that the hole at the top of the upright post has been plugged with a piece of wood. This is simply to keep wood shaving, sawdust, and other debris from depositing there.........;)

    ko
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2017
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  15. Grant Wilkinson

    Grant Wilkinson

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  16. John Taliaferro

    John Taliaferro

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    I have been using roller blade wheels for asphalt they were harder and bounced less and worked ok . But was given some roller skate wheels they are like hard nylon and tare the surface up some but cured my bounce problem . I just leave the area proud and sand it down later . What iam trying to say is watch the bounce in wheels .
     
  17. odie

    odie

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    For "bounce"..... if reducing the rpm doesn't cure the problem, then the bowl may have warped too far out of geometric integrity to use the OBS at all. There are times when the bowl noticeably warps right before your very eyes, as you reduce the wall thickness. The OBS may have started out working ok, but looses it's usefulness, as warp becomes more of a factor. The further away you get from a perfectly round circle, the usefulness of the OBS is reduced. You can get away with some warp, but not very much. If the total warp is about 1/8", or more, it may be best to forget about using the OBS.

    I've never tried any roller skate wheels, but since they have a wide flat surface (meant for quad application), they wouldn't adapt well to concave surfaces (such as inside a flared rim profile). This rim profile is something that I often find myself required to deal with.

    For my needs, I'm finding a single narrow point of contact works best. I'll be discussing this in a subsequent post (with photos), but I shape my wheels to more of a "V" shape, than the rounded profile these inline skate wheels normally come with. A residual effect of this reshaping may also influence the flexibility of the rubber at the contact point, as well. (.....which may improve the ability of the wheel to absorb harmonic vibrations caused by the cutting action of gouges and scrapers.)

    ko
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2017
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  18. odie

    odie

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    I'm sure most of you are already aware of this, but when shaping the exterior profile of a bowl, the OBS can be put on the back side of the bowl, so that it's not interfering with tool accessibility.....such as with this cherry burl I'm currently working on. Generally, it's best to have the wheels close to the cutting action, but the OBS still benefits the purpose of reducing vibration when mounted at the rear. I flip the scissor assembly over for mounting on the back side. This moves the base further away from the area you may want to use for the banjo.
    IMG_2523.JPG

    Notice the triangular piece of white shelving underneath the bowl, and resting atop the bedways. This makes it better to clearly observe the changing exterior profile of the bowl as it's being turned. Sometimes I shine a light directly on the shelving.....which makes the bowl profile stand out even more clearly.

    ko
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2017
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  19. RichColvin

    RichColvin

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    I like to turn cedar & juniper with the grain parallel to the bed.

    IMG_7999.JPG IMG_7997.JPG

    When I finish the outside and take away the tailstock, I need something to steady the wood when working on the inside. I use the Carter Multi-Rest and like it greatly. Works well to keep the piece from disengaging from the chuck.

    IMG_7996.JPG
     
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  20. Leo Van Der Loo

    Leo Van Der Loo

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    I have used a home made steady once in a while, though mostly on larger bowls, seldom needed on bowls 12” and smaller, for me at least.

    It seems to me that the shape of the bowl has a lot to do with it, as well as thickness of the bottom and size of the recess or tenon.

    First thing I do, if the wood is moving away from the tool is to sharpen the tool, if that doesn’t help enough then a smaller tool that takes a smaller cut and so less power cutting.

    After that the steady gets rigged up, hand steadying is usually not working with the large circumference of the larger bowls for me.

    I made the steady with just one wheel, bolted onto a arm that is also bolted onto a larger angle iron, so I can swing the arm up or down to set the wheel where I am cutting.

    I made a couple of pictures as I found the improvement quite impressive with just this rudimentary steady I am using,

    These picture are just made for my self, not to show off what I do, but like in the picture of the Black Walnut bowl, it shows what the surface was before adding the steady and then on the right how much that improved with the use of the steady, and on the rim where the direction of cutting pressure is not in the direction of the steady is holding there is still an improvement in the cut quality, so yes at times it is a good tool to improve the outcome of your turning.

    steady at work.jpg steady rigged.jpg steady use improvement.jpg cutting improvement.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2017
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