Bowl steady tips?

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by Zach LaPerriere, Jan 23, 2017.

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  1. Tom Albrecht

    Tom Albrecht

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    Odie, I'd like to see how that blue tape- hockey tape wrapped piece finished & turned out. Otherwise I won't believe it.

    Also, I was just looking back at your first photo with your spring modification. Do you use the spring resistance only, and not tighten that wing nut?
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2017
  2. odie

    odie

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    Tom......That example was put together specifically for the photo, and I removed the tape afterwards. The bowl is still out in the shop, and I haven't touched it since then. I have a basic idea of what I want to do with it, but seldom does the final turning ever turn out exactly like I envisioned it. When I get back to it, I may use the tape, and I may not. Like I said, sometimes it works, and sometimes it doesn't. With woodturning, sometimes you just have to use every little advantage in your bag of tricks to bring a piece of wood to a conclusion you are happy with.....and in the process, continue to self-improve.

    You are welcome to believe what you want.......personally, I really don't care.......because I'm not here to instruct. I'm happy to give my opinions, and point out what I think is important. The bottom line is I am in it for me, and me alone. Take whatever I have to say, any way you wish. The real reason I'm here on these forums, is to keep my mind focused on all aspects of woodturning, and to get inspiration from others......in which I'm very much like everybody else is........sometimes the input inspires me to do some investigation and experimentation. That is where any value other's input has for me.......growth, in any way I interpret "growth" to be!

    To answer your question: Yes, I have the option to either use the spring pressure on the wheels without locking down the scissor arms...........or, to bypass the spring's influence, and lock down the scissor arms. There are advantages to either method, and neither holds any universal advantage. You may be like I am, and have to try things repeatedly, before the light bulb clicks. :eek:

    ko
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2017
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  3. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I figured that Tom was just yanking your chain, Odie. :D

    About hockey tape. That's like speaking a foreign language here where the only ice is in our tea glass. :) I'll have to look it up on the Internet. I suspect that I won't find it on the shelf in any store here unless its the same thing as some other kind of tape. What is it used for? hand grip on stick, wrap around your shin or elbow, or something else?
     
  4. odie

    odie

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    Bill......The hockey tape is mostly used for wrapping hockey sticks, I think......gives it a better gripping surface. Anyway, I first used it to wrap dumbbells, and other exercise equipment. It's commonly available on Amazon and eBay.....that's where I get it.

    HG Weider DBs and BS attachments.jpg
     
  5. Tom Albrecht

    Tom Albrecht

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    Sorry if I offended you Odie, it was my lame attempt at being humorous.
     
  6. odie

    odie

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    That's quite alright, Tom.......probably some things need to be said anyway......specifically the point of how I'm not trying to be an instructor to anyone on these forums. (With my own son, this is an entirely different matter, though. :cool:)

    I do have my core beliefs and self-learned procedures concerning woodturning that tend to run contrary to popular opinion, at times. These things have brought me to confrontation with others about "right and wrong"......but, as long as it's understood that I'm not attempting to do anything but give opinions......then we all can digest each other's input from a perspective that promotes openness about giving those thoughts and ideas.

    One suggestion I would make, is when using humor, take advantage of using the emoticons......;) It's a difficult thing to convey tone when typing, and those little smiley faces go a long way to suggest the standpoint from which one speaks. :D

    ko
     
  7. odie

    odie

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    About that hockey tape......

    Although I began using it for my exercise equipment, it morphed into other uses around my shop. Most significantly, it's usefulness has been great for me as a wrap for my lathe tools. This offers a little more "substance" to the feel, and I've had thoughts of it leading to just a smidgen of more control over that you get with bare wood. Anything that leads to that, is a good thing.......but, other than that, it does give a little "color coding" to the lathe tools.

    I bought a bunch of the hockey tape that was advertised on a close out......so, have quite a few different colors and patterns available to use........:D

    ko
    IMG_2574.JPG
     
  8. Leo Van Der Loo

    Leo Van Der Loo

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    Bill, hockey sticks are not cheap, and if you have a couple of boys playing, especially out on the road they wreck them in no time at all, so hockey tape repairs and extend the life of them.

    The tape doesn’t last very long but some tape, even electrical is cheaper than another hockey stick, and yes some is used on the handle as well, there it will last much longer than on the end :)

    Someone even made a video of something that every kid here already knows how to do ;)


    View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RzPP292HHds
     
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  9. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Thanks for the information, Leo. If I could read between the spoken lines in the video I would guess that the pro players don't tape up the stick because they don't want to obscure the brand. :D

    This has led me to wonder about the brooms that the sweepers use in the sport of curling and whether an opportunity is being overlooked by sporting goods manufacturers. :)

    Curling seems to be a cross between bowling and chess while hockey ls sort of like rugby with sticks.
     
  10. RichColvin

    RichColvin

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    Odie,

    What is the motivation for wrapping your lathe tools in tape ?

    Kind regards,
    Rich
     
  11. odie

    odie

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    Hello Rich......It does add a bit to the feel......more "positive", and I can't help but think it gives me just a tad more control.....probably very subjective.

    As a default, it becomes part of quick identification......:)

    ko
     
  12. Leo Van Der Loo

    Leo Van Der Loo

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    Bill I think they (pro players) can afford to pay for new sticks, if they don’t get payed for using someones sticks, then again tape makers could advertise their name also, who’s willing to pay for what is the ???, maybe Ford could advertise on the brooms, sweep the road clear from Chevys ;) :D
     
  13. odie

    odie

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    Tom.......I finished that one this afternoon. Used the OBS, but didn't use any tape. The tape is useful occasionally when it's a bit too far out of round, but this one had minimal variation anyway. IMG_2593.JPG
    It's English Walnut.......

    ko
     
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  14. Zach LaPerriere

    Zach LaPerriere

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    Hi Odie,

    That looks like a great shallow bowl. If I may ask...I would never think to put the OBS on something that small or seeming to have a substantial rim like...can I ask what the OBS does for a bowl like that? Thanks!

    And a small question...do you use a gear wrench or anything a bit faster for the bolt that attaches the OBS to the ways? I thought about using my el cheapo smaller banjo since I upgraded to a Robust banjo. That would mean talking to my machinist to turn a 1" shaft on big solid shaft for the OBS. For some reason, a regular wrench just feels a little slow to me.

    Again: I appreciate all the sharing of your OBS experience.
     
  15. odie

    odie

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    Howdy Zach.......

    I'm not in the shop right now, but I believe that English Walnut bowl was about 7" diameter. If it makes the difference between start sanding at 320, rather than 240, it's well worth using the OBS......even on smaller bowls. I pretty much use the OBS on everything these days. The OBS is only a fraction of the total equation. Sharp tools, and good presentation/technique are also major factors. Starting at the highest possible sandpaper grit is where it's at......! The less sanding you do, the better pure geometric shape you can maintain. The better pure geometric shape you maintain, the better the details will appear to the eye.

    I'll try to remember to take a photo of the bolt for the OBS bedway adapter. I've modified mine to better snug it up with my fingers.......still using a box end wrench to tighten it down......only about 1/4 turn to lock it in place after taking up the slack with my fingers. It's actually pretty quick......:D

    Let us know if you end up using your old banjo for the OBS......that sounds like an interesting modification.:)

    ko
     
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  16. Zach LaPerriere

    Zach LaPerriere

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    Thanks, Odie. You mean I can't just attack the bowl with a dull tool and have all sins forgiven when using the OBS? :D Dang!

    Seriously now, you've inspired me to try the OBS when I wouldn't think otherwise to try it. I'd definitely use the OBS frequently if I could save much of any sanding time. Even if I broke even on set-up time, I'd do it. Sanding just ain't fun...I bought some wireless headphones, so now I listen to a bit of a podcast while I powersand (never while turning) and that takes the drudgery away.

    I'm well aware that I may get different results than you (different woods, different tools, different experience, etc.), but I'll give it a shot soon with the OBS on a number of bowls I wouldn't have thought to. Sometimes it seems to take a while before a good technique pays off, so I'll hang in there for a while if need be.

    And yes, I'll keep in touch if I modify the OBS to fit the crummy banjo.

    Have a good evening.
     
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  17. Tom Albrecht

    Tom Albrecht

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    A simple mod of an adjustable handle makes the adjustment a snap.

    bolt - 1.jpg
     
  18. odie

    odie

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    OK, here's the modified bolt and box end wrench. The bolt head is flattened on two sides to make it more compatible to using fingers to take up the slack......sort of like a wing nut. The original bolt doesn't protrude very far, so this was my thinking for keeping it.......to address "clearance" concerns. Once the slack is taken up by rotating the bolt with my fingers, the box end wrench is used.....only a matter of about 1/4 turn to snug it down. The box end wrench is flattened for access when the clearance is minimal. The box end wrench hangs on my accessory table that sits between the bedways.

    ko
    IMG_2594.JPG
    IMG_2439_LI (2).jpg
     
  19. Zach LaPerriere

    Zach LaPerriere

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    Nice job, Odie. Like you, my father is a machinist, and he's always modifying that sort of thing. I love that spirit.

    I should have thought of that sooner!
     
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  20. odie

    odie

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    Heh,heh,heh......:D Yeah, you know it, Zach!......It's a joke that has an element of truth, and that's what makes it funny.....and, VERY applicable!

    You know, Zach......I think some of us turners may be surprised with how many new (and even some "experienced") turners have no concept of how many things MUST come together, in order to have any real degree of success. New turners come, and they go.......most of them (as I see it) will initially have a great deal of enthusiasm, because they have learned that no matter how bad a tool finish they end up with, then power sanding will bring their turning to a reasonable conclusion. In my opinion, it's the lack of sanding that is the real key to success. The less sanding that is required, the less variation from a pure geometric shape is possible. Of course, it's not possible to entirely eliminate sanding, but striving for that goal is that which becomes a springboard to success. Yes, I do believe the OBS is one notable contraption available to us that is worthwhile to pursue, and it's performance can be improved upon.....with the notation that it will never be any more than one small part of a very big overall equation. If ALL those other elements of the "big picture" are not successfully addressed.....then no matter how much any one component of the equation is individually successful.....the overall result will not be as aesthetically appealing as it could have been.

    Because quite a few turners require excessive sanding, it's the main reason why so many of them pursue "embellishment"......because embellishment is not dependent on a pure geometric shape.......o_O (Note: This is not to disparage the many beautiful turnings that are accomplished through embellishment.....but, there is embellishment as one aspect, and excellence in the mechanics of turning on the lathe......and these are two entirely different things!) ;)

    ko
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2017
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