Buffing system?

Discussion in 'Newbie' started by Fadi Zeidan, Jul 20, 2016.

  1. john lucas

    john lucas

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    I'm with Al. I usually sand to 400 grit and find that under a finish you can't really tell the difference. Lately I've been sanding to 600 grit. Not because it improves the look but because it seems to take less finish to get the same final results. As Al said some woods simply need higher sanding. Only experience will tell. Most of the problems I see on new turners work is simply not sanding completely with the lower grits. You have to learn to see tearout, deep scratches and other defects and get rid of those before you step up to the next grit. Look very closely. Each grit should have a very even appearance everywhere. By that I mean you should only see sanding scratches of the same size. If you see a dull or uneven colored area that is a place that hasn't been sanded enough. Stop the lathe and hand sand that area. Then step up in grit and look closely again. Usually once you get the whole piece to have the same scratch pattern with the first couple of grits then you can sand through the rest of the grits with little effort.
     
  2. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    I have had good success using a friction polish finish on the lathe after sanding the piece.
    This method is quick and easy and you can apply multiple coats of finish in minutes with great results.
    I have made a variety of friction polishes this last year, it is easy to make a custom blend to work with different woods depending on the finish desired.
     
  3. Fadi Zeidan

    Fadi Zeidan

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    I'm spending more time sanding than I am turning, but I don't see my mistakes until I apply the finish. I'm practicing and trying to refine my sanding skills.

    Mike, you make your own blend of friction polish? I have one piece that was finished using friction polish that I did in class at Woodcraft store.
     
  4. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    With practice you will get clean cuts with a gouge that will greatly reduce the sanding time.
    You also get a lot faster with the turning...

    Scrapers can sometimes improve on the surface left by the gouge.

    Hunter carbides leave excellent surfaces
     
  5. Fadi Zeidan

    Fadi Zeidan

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    I have the simple ahear cutting finisher from Harrison Specialties. Any recommendation on which Hunter tools?

    http://www.harrisonspecialties.com/...tipped-turning-hollowing-tool-without-handle/

    I want to transition to gouges after I find a class or someone to teach me how to use them and sharpen them. I am looking for someone, hopefully in Texas, who would provide small or one on one few days class. May find someone in next local chapter meeting.
     
  6. Gerald Lawrence

    Gerald Lawrence

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    It depends on what you want to do. I prefer the #4 for inside bowls. John Lucas says the Hercules is great for bowl hollowing. If you are hollowing ornaments there is a terrific set of which I just got the shoulder tool at the Symposium. And the list goes on as he expands his line of tools. Like Al said learn how to sharpen and use your bowl gouge and it will pay dividends in the future. By the way most Hunter tools are geared for hollowing.
     
  7. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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  8. Mark Hepburn

    Mark Hepburn

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    Amen to that. I bought all that stuff I "needed" and so now that I'm learning what I really need - as opposed to just want - I'm selling off stuff.

    Fadi, I would suggest that you consider John's point about getting a chainsaw. Its up front cost will quickly pay for itself in blanks you didn't have to buy. Also, if there's a local tree service you might ask them if you can swing by before they start chipping. Or if the county does tree work, they may have some for you too.

    I have friends (many of whom have received bowls, etc) who come to work and mention that there's a tree sectioned off somewhere and I'll make a lunchtime excursion to get it.

    Oh, and my entire family knows that all I really want for Christmas is exotic lumber :D
     
  9. Mark Hepburn

    Mark Hepburn

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    Gerald, I got the Hunter based on a conversation with John and love it. I use it for small box interiors and small, deep bowls instead of a bottom gouge. John's videos on it are very helpful too. But it sure isn't a substitute for learning to sharpen.
     
  10. Fadi Zeidan

    Fadi Zeidan

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    Chainsaw will come with time. I don't feel I'm at a point to buy one and start cutting my own blanks but I do see the value of doing so down the road. I need to hone my turning skills and see where that takes me first.

    The reason I'm asking about the Hunter tools is that they have many, #4, #5, #3 Hercules, and Osprey. #4 and #5 seem to be similar to Harrison Specialties ones.

    I will look for john's videos...

    By the way, thanks everyone, I really appreciate all the help and Patience!
     
  11. john lucas

    john lucas

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    That Harrison tool appears to be similar to a Hunter #5. Don't use it flat with the face up. It will not cut clean and give you catches. Using it with the bevel rubbing like a blunt ground bowl gouge will give very good results. Here is my video showing how I use the #4 or #5 as well as some other tools.

    View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nfp2kvhH6Mo
     
  12. Fadi Zeidan

    Fadi Zeidan

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    Thanks John!

    Turns out I've been watching your videos but did not make the connection that it is you :)

    I'm very impressed with the hunter tools in your videos. Looks like the #4 is similar but better than Harrison Specialties Simple Shear Cutting tool since it allows you to ride the bevel. The rest are unique for each product. Harrison Specialties are more like Easy Wood Tools.

    I think I may go with the Osprey and Hercules in couple of months. I'm really impressed by the videos
     
  13. Mark Hepburn

    Mark Hepburn

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    Fadi, you will likely be pleased. I had a couple of the Easy Wood tools. Very nice but I just couldn't get used to them.

    You can't go wrong watching Johns videos either!
     
  14. john lucas

    john lucas

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    You reallly only need one. The Osprey and Hercules do the same thing. The Hercules is better if you are a new turner and plan to use it mostly as a scraper. It is still easy to use as a bevel rubbing tool. The Osprey is better for turners who learned on the bowl gouge. Because it has a round shank and the nose of the tool is similar to the bowl gouge you would use it in a push cut the same as bowl gouge. When the Osprey is used as a scraper it takes more concentration to keep the tool relatively flat. With the Hercules the tool simply sits on the large flat shank. The Hercules is a little better for roughing really out of round bowl blanks than the Osprey. For experienced turners both of those tools work pretty much the same. The two tools I use the most are the Osprey and the #5. I use the Osprey when I need a cleaner cut than a bowl gouge will give me. I use the #5 as a bottom cleaner or a way to finish of deep steep sided vessels like box bottoms or Calabash bowl shapes.
     
  15. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    CraigList is a great resource for finding freshly cut wood, I also run across retired woodworkers cleaning out their inventory and many times you
    can get a great deal on hardwoods for pennies on the dollar. When a listing is posted on CraigsList for a tree that has been cut down, depending
    on the wood species these can go quickly if the firewood guys are looking for wood. You will also find the local tree cutters who are processing trees
    into slabs and billets. I usually do a search on "woodworking" ,"wood" and "lathe" several times a day and look for new postings.
     

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