Can Someone Help me out ( LDD Bowl Drying issues )

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by Andrew McCarn, Sep 14, 2017.

  1. John Tisdale

    John Tisdale

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2014
    Messages:
    106
    Location:
    Dallas, TX
    One additional comment: Steven Russell suggest boiling for an hour per inch - as my roughs can be less that perfect, I generally boil for 2-hours. I then let the water cool overnight and pull the soaked piece, put it into a sealed cardboard box (can find a large enough grocery bag) and let it go for 3-5 months with a small computer fan pulling the air out of the interior and circulating the moist air inside the box - don't have the air blowing into the piece. It is also in a de-humidified room - summers can be sticky here in Dallas.

    The amazing, and counter-intuitive, thing is: the wood dries quicker (dry defined as 6%-MC). And while the surface may be between dull and yukkie, when you cut 1/16 or more below the surface, it's like it was.

    When you think about it, the trunk of a large tree has serious tonnage pressing down and serious forces with even a small breeze - the limbs sticking out at angles have serious stress - try extending your arm holding a few pounds - then imagine doing that a few decades. The boiling seems to mitigate some of those internal stresses.

    My goal for the last ten-years has always been to out-smart the log - every time I think I'm getting there I get my "come-uppins"
     
  2. olaf Vogel

    olaf Vogel

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2015
    Messages:
    199
    Location:
    Toronto, Ont, CA
    Home Page:
    Boiling, microwaving, steeming, all have some success. The heat breaks down the lignin which makes the wood more mailable. That reduces the cracking. However, I suspect, only to a point.

    The piece in your aviator would shrink considerably in cross section.
    But turned as end grain, might crack. I've tried large end grains like that, but without success.
    I've tried to mimic the Moultroups solutions, but no luck. Yet....
     
  3. Tom Albrecht

    Tom Albrecht

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2014
    Messages:
    428
    Location:
    Midwest USA
    So, from the looks of what I have seen here, I would be better off drying my roughed, Anchor sealed blanks in the unheated garage rather than in the house basement in the vicinity of the gas furnace. Actually, I mean to pose this as a question of advice here.
    1. Unheated Midwest garage?
    2. Moderately heated basement?
    The question comes up at this point, because in our new home, I have more basement storage available that I previously did. I also alternate between the brown paper bags and the Anchor Seal.
     
  4. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2016
    Messages:
    648
    Location:
    Nebraska
    Your furnace room will be the driest area in your basement, the other variable is how
    high of humidity you keep your house at in the winter months.
    You could also look at your furnace room as being a small kiln drying room.
    If you monitor the humidity in the different areas of your basement you can
    move the wood to the areas best suited for the blanks based on moisture content.
     
  5. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    8,217
    Location:
    Dalworthington Gardens, TX
    Home Page:
    We don't have a basement and our garage isn't in the Midwest, but I can say what I do. I just have them in a big pile in the garage after I rough them and coat them with Anchorseal. We have an air conditioner in the garage that we use most of the year and a couple Vornado portable electric heaters that we use during winter so most of the time the temperature ranges between 60° and 80°. Our humidity seems high, but it's probably about average and it's nothing compared to the humidity in Houston where I grew up.

    I was in Kansas for a couple years when I was in the Army and the humidity was extremely low and I imagine that would present a big problem when you don't want to dry wood too fast.
     
  6. Leo Van Der Loo

    Leo Van Der Loo

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2016
    Messages:
    209
    Location:
    Rainy River District Ontario Canada
    I would and did/do use the basement to dry my rough outs in the brown paper bags, not in the furnace room though, too much heat and air movement , but on the floor where there is basically no air movement.

    I rather have a slower drying environment that is basically stable throughout the year unlike what a garage would be.
     
  7. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2015
    Messages:
    465
    Location:
    Maui, Hawaii
    Home Page:
    I also agree with Paul and Odie. I found that trying to find the magic solution is a waste of time and money. I dont even coat my bowls, up on a shelve they go, when I'm ready, or if a customer picks it, I finish it. I have a better than 90 % successful rate... No substitute for patience...
     
    odie likes this.
  8. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    8,217
    Location:
    Dalworthington Gardens, TX
    Home Page:
    I think that being in a hurry and wanting instant drying is a normal phase that every new turner goes through. I think it was Paul who mentioned PEG earlier. Coincidentally, I stumbled across a box containing two blocks of PEG1000 that I bought many years ago and never used. The interesting thing is that those blocks are now just a leaky plastic bag of greasy mush. What a nasty mess.
     
    odie likes this.
  9. john lucas

    john lucas

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2004
    Messages:
    5,872
    Location:
    Cookeville TN USA
    Drying is about 2 things. heat and air movement. The paper sacks work wonders for me. It keeps the air movement down and allows just enough moisture to escape to properly slow down the drying. I still coat the end grains with sealer. Maybe that's a habit thing. I also never leave a sharp edge on roughed out work. That sharp edge willl try to lose moisture faster and that's where a lot of my cracks start. I now store my green wood in a shed that has water flowing through it when it rains. I keep a dehumidifier in there but we are talking a serious amount of water when it rains. This has actually worked to my advantage in that i haven't lost a piece yet. I do have to bring my dry wood into the shop and let it sit for a week or more to get the wood down to the proper level. It comes out of my shed around 14% IN the shop it will get down to 11% and sometimes lower.
     

Share This Page