Carbide cutters

Discussion in 'Newbie' started by Dave Fritz, Mar 21, 2016.

  1. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    Chris,
    I assume you are talking about the mcNaughton bowl saver and not their hollowing system.

    My advice is don't try to do everything at once. Turn bowls and small hollow forms you can handle with your 1/2" Jordan tools. Develop your markets and skills. You can sell a whole lot of 7" tall hollow forms if they have nice curves. Then look at tools for deeper hollowing.

    I have a set of Carbide tools for hollowing that I never use because they are too slow.
    I use HSS cutters.

    The Bosch tools will fit any 3/4" socket. What Handle do you have for the Jordon tools?
    I think the Jordan Armbrace comes with a 3/4" socket and an adapter for the the 1/2" tools.
    If you are happy with that handle it may already fit a 3/4" tools.

    The Jamieson handle will fit the Bosch tools.
    You can build a back rest withe screws, a few feet of 2x6, and part of a 1/4 sheet of plywood. The backrest can be down right flimsy and work well.
     
  2. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Why not make your own handles and save $85? Carbide cutters are a lot more expensive than HSS if you're wanting to save money. Lyle Jamieson will provide instructions to you for free if you want to make your own hollowing rig.
     
  3. Steve Worcester

    Steve Worcester Admin Emeritus

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    To answer that question, no. That one is a rectangular bar. Hunter makes a round bar one and Trent does make a round bar one that would work in hollowing tools that have a replaceable round cutter, provided the round shank is of the proper diamter
     
  4. chrisdaniels

    chrisdaniels

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    yes the mcnaughton center saver. I've done a couple dozen sets of cores and am just now starting to get the hang of it. did my first burl bowl set the other day. 3 cores out of an 8-9w by 4" deep and felt like the king of the world lol! Hock I think you're on to something with that advice. I have been doing this near a year and a half and have more money into turning tools than anything else i've invested into! probably time to slow down, (don't tell my wife I said that).

    Are there any books or dvd's that are recommended to steer you in the right direction to become a professional turner? I figure the lot of you know more than most on the subject.
     
  5. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Attend symposiums, join at least one club, get good enough to start teaching at clubs and then at regional symposiums, turn lots of stuff, sell it anywhere you can, get a degree in art, spend a couple decades as a evolving amateur and spend time taking classes with as many professionals as you can, become good enough to attract the attention of a serious collector, and prepare to buy clothes with a smaller waist size.

    In order to appreciate the magnitude of the commitment, take a peek at the resume of some of the major professionals such as David Ellsworth.
     
  6. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    1. Don't slow down but concentrate on doing what you are doing better and better.
    Mastering the coring is big step.

    2. I am not aware of any books on becoming a professional turner.
    There are always panels on becoming a professional at the AAW symposium
    It is a competitive field. You might want to talk with some proffessionals. A few turners make a good living turning, a whole lot pay for their hobby and more.

    A. architectural turning can be a good business, I know several people who make a living doing architectural work. If you are in the location this may be the best field to start a business.
    An architectural turner in Baltimore has built a line of beer taps whith which he has done well.
    People restoring houses and furniture need custom turned pieces sometime in the hundreds.
    They are willing to pay. Premium prices for custom turned pieces.

    B. Turn things you can sell wholesale. Bowls can be a good source of income if you can make hundreds of them for the wholesale market each year. Pens and bottle stoppers were a good wholesale item 20 years ago. I have freind who sells pepper mills. He sells at kitchen shows, got a cover on a cooking magazine.

    C. High end pens- not too many in this market but the successful ones are selling to pen collectors at big time pen shows. The idea is to make and sell unique pens. The well made one of a kind pens sell for 10s of thousands of dollars. If you hit big on 10 pens you can make a nice living for a year.

    D. High end art market - this is a tough one to make a living in. You have to turn things no one else is making and they have to be near flawless. It is also full of ups and downs.

    Good luck
    Al
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2016
  7. john lucas

    john lucas

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    That tool from Packard won't fit in the Jordan bars. If I'm correct his have a round shank that goes into the boring bar. The packard one is square and too large. Mike Hunter sells both the square and the round. The square one fits Lyle Jamieson's tools and the round one fit's Johns. You could of course just swap the cutter or simply buy another cutter from Hunter tools.
     
  8. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    If you look at the professionals who do it for a living, most are high end artists who show in galleries, and/or travel a lot which means going around the world, demonstrate, put on work shops, have signature tools, gadgets and gizmos, and videos. It is a lot of work. Selling is as much of an art as turning, and you have to run a business. Not easy. How do you make a small fortune in business? Start with a large one. Being 'semi-pro' worked for me. I made and sold enough to support my habit and pay a few bills. Other wise it would have been work.

    robo hippy
     
  9. chrisdaniels

    chrisdaniels

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    I like the way you put it robo!
     

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