Creative filling of bug holes?

Discussion in 'Newbie' started by Jamie Straw, Apr 19, 2016.

  1. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    This bowl is not gallery-bound:rolleyes:, but I want to play with ideas of what to do with bug holes. It's spalted alder, and has a few small bug holes toward the rim area (but not too close). The only two I've come up with so far are epoxy/sawdust to match, and black CA. Anything else come to mind?
     
  2. David Hill

    David Hill

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    Jamie,
    I do lots of filling since I use lots of Mesquite & other local trees that either have grubs or cracks when I turn them. I like to use 2 part epoxy (not the 5 minute stuff) or CA in conjunction with minerals like turquoise & its cousins or Malachite. My choice of glue depends on the size of the defect. Other minerals can be used, but DO check the hardness (Mohs scale from jr. high) as lots of the pretty stuff is as hard/harder than your tools or the abrasive in sandpaper. Have even used copious amounts of really fine glitter in epoxy, actually looked really nice.
    My logic for using the colored materials is that if I'm going to "fix" it, it might as well stand out---so I don't do much with sawdust or coffee grounds.
    I'm aware of inlace & colors but I really like making my own.
     
  3. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I can vouch for what Dave says about hard minerals. After using turquoise Inlace (turquoise colored pieces in the clear Inlace resin) for several years, it occurred to me that it didn't seem right to use fake turquoise in an otherwise nice piece of mesquite so I started using real turquoise and prefer the real stuff. I still use Inlace resin because it is glass clear, is bubble free, doesn't yellow, doesn't shrink when curing, takes a high gloss when polished, and cures very hard. The cost is a bit less than epoxy.

    When I first started turning I heard a lot of others talking about using wood dust mixed with various kinds of glue so I gave it a try. What I found is that rather than matching the wood , it stood out as an ugly looking patch. After learning that lesson, I'm with Dave on either featuring it or leaving it alone.
     
  4. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    If the holes are small an option is silver. It comes in wire of various diameter.
    Jimmy Clewes does this on box lids. Drills a hole, cuts a bit of wire, glues it in the hole, turns the surface.
     
  5. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    Thanks for that tip, I'll get some for future use. Lots of holey woods up here.:)

    My expectation exactly. And I suspect the black CA will just look like some kind of skin disease. As far as "leaving it alone" (which I wouldn't mind), does that mean not fill it with anything, just let the oil/poly/lacquer or whatever I'm using skip over the holes? I guess I could put clear CA in them. They are pretty small holes.
     
  6. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    That sounds like a cool idea. Might not waste it on this bowl, but it would be good to have it on hand. Is there a particular grade of silver that's best?
     
  7. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    Mohs scale?

    Mmmm, don't remember Mohs scale. Back in the Dark Ages when I went to Jr. High, I don't think we covered such things (still got into U of Calif. though:D) I'm subscribing to this thread, so will tap your knowledge when it comes to such filling. Thanks!
     
  8. Clifton C

    Clifton C

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    I buy from Riogrande.com , usually get dead soft or half hard sterling. The argentium might be better for this as its more tarnish resistant. Rio may not be the cheapest but they sell numbered drill bits to match the wire gage. 18 gauge wire (item # 100318) has in its description its inch and millimeter diameter. The numbered drill bit #61 (item # 349420) also gives the inch and millimeter diameter so its easy to match wire gauge with # bit.
    If you've never heard of riogrande, I'll just apologize now...
    cc
     
  9. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    Hey, thanks CC, that's great info, will be used.
     
  10. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I thought that Gurls[SUP]1[/SUP] automatically knew about the Mohs scale. :rolleyes: .... not to be confused with Mohs surgery.

    Clear CA is great for filling small holes. Another one that works well is Starbond brown CA which is actually transparent amber color. I highly recommend keeping Inlace and CA refrigerated. Inlace will keep two or more years if refrigerated, but may only last six months in a hot garage. Same for CA. I have a garage fridge where I can store stuff like that.



    [SUP]1[/SUP] If you remember the Calvin and Hobbs comic strip and his alter ego Spaceman Spiff.
     
  11. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    Too funny. :D Sounds like the Starbond brown should be on my shelf. The bowl in question is now two halves -- not sure I'll want to turn any more of that old Alder except for practice.
     
  12. Chuck Lobaito

    Chuck Lobaito

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    coffee grinds with ca or epoxy
    have it stabilized with resin and color the resin
     

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