Cutting a crotch in half

Discussion in 'Tutorials and Tips' started by hockenbery, May 10, 2014.

  1. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    I am often asked how to cut blanks from crotches.

    The way I do it is to employ a low tech custom made " log processing station"
    This is a log section with a notch. The notch needs to hold the crotch.

    I set the crotch in the notch so that the centers of the two centers on one end are aligned vertically.
    I make a mark top center over the centers and make a ripping vertically though the centers of all three y sections of the crotch.

    The photos show
    Log holder notch
    A live oak crotch being cut
    The inside of the crotch
     

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    Last edited: May 10, 2014
  2. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    When I collect crotches I look for smooth even bark in the crotch
    A bump or bark that looks like stitching indicates that a bark inclusion is likely

    The photos below show a Bark inclusion
    The two parts of this crotch are joined by bark not wood
    They will come a part when turned.
     

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  3. Steve Worcester

    Steve Worcester Admin Emeritus

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    Most of the stuff I get is big enough I just set a flat side on the grass and saw it.
    Normally on a log, I mark out a two inch section that would cut out the heart. With crutches, I just try to align all the centers and cut. A ripping chain or skip chain aides in this, but is not an anti-kickback so you have to have heightened spidey seances when cutting. Actually anytime with a chainsaw, you do.
     
  4. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    Steve I have a ripping chain I use if I'm doing a whole lot of ripping.
    Like cutting platter blanks.
    If I remember correctly the teeth are sharpened 20 left 20 right, 0 as a chipper.
    Makes a smoother surface and seems to follow the line better than a standard chain.

    I have heard they can be more prone to kick back.

    I try to respect the all saws at all times.

    Al
     
  5. Steve Worcester

    Steve Worcester Admin Emeritus

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    The kick back is because of the lower rakers and the skip chain. They cut and clear so well, you have to stop sometimes and clear the shavings out of the chain cover. I love them but for some reason even with less cutters they cost more. Must be increased liability insurance.
     

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