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Cutting blanks from logs/wood prep.

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by Colin Nelson, Dec 15, 2017.

  1. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    Basically the electric Husqvarna ran a long time on one charge. The fellow did say that it was hard to break old habits and took his gas saw with him. The best part was you didn't have to pull a rope, carry a gas can or mix gas, plus the noise factor. It seems that for cutting wood that a gas saw would do, the electric would be adequate. Keep in mind this would be for light work for clearing pathways, tree limbs, etc. for deer hunting situations. Probably the same for a gas saw. For what I would use it for around the lot, it would be good. But...........I have a chainsaw that was free. All it needed was a new fuel line and priming line.
     
  2. Richard Coers

    Richard Coers

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    Most of the time I start with splitting wedges. Doesn't work well on crotch pieces, but perfect for round log sections.
     
  3. Mike Brazeau

    Mike Brazeau

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    There is a basic guide on the Wood Magazine site that probably originated in the days when Phil Brennion, who was an AAW President years ago, was their woodturning editor. ( to best of my aging memory). It shows a very simple holder that does not take up a lot of storage space. You do have to get down to ground level though. I don't have trouble getting down, however the getting up can be an issue. https://www.woodmagazine.com/materials-guide/lumber/from-trees-to-turning-blanks
     
  4. Owen Lowe

    Owen Lowe

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    And not stinking like 2-stroke oily exhaust after use!
    An added plus: you can use it inside your garage or home shop at 2 a.m. without surprise visits from the authorities and/or ambulance guys carting you off from CO poisoning! :p
     
  5. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    Let me mention that I have a gas saw and a HF electric saw. Got the HF first and then a friend gave me the gas saw if I could get it running.
     
  6. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    Saw an ad for Husqvarna in the magazine I mentioned- it's 40 volts. The battery also fits other power tools as well.
     
  7. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    Some of those gas powered chainsaws can throw you a fit when you run into a problem.
    Some machines like to vapor-lock when they get hot.
    Old fuel can gum up the fuel filter and cause you fits.
    A plugged orifice in the carburetor can cause you fits.
    A bad gasket on the carburetor can cause you fits.
    A bad diaphragm in the carburetor can cause you fits.
    A fouled spark plug can cause you fits.
    A crack in the fuel supply line in the tank can cause you fits.
    The throttle and choke controls if not adjusted properly can cause you fits.
    You either learn your machine inside and out or you drop it off for your yearly maintenance.
     
  8. john lucas

    john lucas

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    My Husquvarna saw is considerably lighter than the Stihl. I used both the other day when at a friends house. His did cut faster. I thin it runs at a higher rpm. Mine however does the job quite nicely is lighter and was almost half the cost. When I had to get a new saw I looked really hard at the Stihl because i always wanted one. However my older Husky which I still use is 26 years old and with that in mind I just couldn't talk myself into spending the extra money.
     
  9. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    John, was his blade sharp? I used a McCulloch to cut up a walnut tree. Wish I had the wood now! Anyway, I was not aware that chains took different files. Bought a file and took forever to cut through a small log. Now I'm older and smarter. Well, anyway older.
     
  10. Gerald Lawrence

    Gerald Lawrence

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    Try a Sthil Mike
     
  11. Gerald Lawrence

    Gerald Lawrence

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    John my stihl 028 lasted 36 years and burned up last year. I do not think the new one will last that long or at least i won't. The new one is lighter and requires two pulls to start.
     
  12. Dean Center

    Dean Center

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    Gerald,
    My condolences on the loss of your beloved 028.
     
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  13. Fadi Zeidan

    Fadi Zeidan

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    I’m considering an electric chainsaw. My gas chainsaw is extremely noisy for the neighbors.
     
  14. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    About 2 years ago I got a stihl 261 with an 18”bar to go with my 24” bar stihl 440 magnum.
    Saws with smaller bars generally rev higher than those with longer bars.
    In any event the smaller saw cuts faster and is a lot lighter.

    Also have an ancient poulan 16” electric.

    Electric is a plus if you want to Cut blanks when a gas saw would be unneighborly.
    INDOORS??? remember the electric will shoot bar oil many feet off the end of the bar.
    I never point the running saw toward any place I don’t want oil spray.
     
  15. Dean Center

    Dean Center

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    You mean ALL of the oil isn't on my pants?

    (Safety disclaimer: I always wear my chaps. And hearing protection, and glasses, and face shield, and helmet. So the oil is on my chaps.)
     
  16. Dean Center

    Dean Center

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    In the past, I used an electric chainsaw and was impressed with its effectiveness. One thing I learned when shopping for the saw is that some of the electrics have a plastic cog driving the chain and a few have a metal cog. Without taking the cover off, you really can't tell. It seems to me that this cog is likely to be under a lot of stress during operation and therefore likely to wear out if plastic instead of metal. Just something to think about if you decide you want an electric.

    Another area of difference in electric saws is the presence or absence of overload protection. This proved the undoing of my saw. If the chain is dull, the wood hard, or the bar binds, you can overload the motor and quickly kill the saw. Another thing to think about while shopping.
     
  17. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    Trained termites or a beaver will get the job done, too.
     
  18. John Turpin

    John Turpin

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    A holiday visit to family in West Texas netted me some pecan. About a thousand pounds of pecan. It was all my small pickup could do to get it back up to Oklahoma. My trusty old Husqvarna turned it into about ten good 18" blanks. #2 son helped me get the (extremely heavy green) slabs out of the truck, helped saw it up and then get wax on the end grain. A pretty nice haul I think.

    hauling pecan.jpg pecan2.jpg
     
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  19. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    John, I have a supply of rough cut pecan. I have cut pen blanks from some of the thicker boards. They look nice in their natural color. I did try to color one with a Sharpie and then wipe with a coffee filter and DNA. Came out a grey/black color. Actually looked decent- something different.
     
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  20. John Turpin

    John Turpin

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    I local sawyer called last week and offered me a good deal on a 6" slab of Cottonwood. This species has a pretty bad reputation with turners, but I went ahead and asked for it. It's supposed to start warming up on Wednesday, so I'll head up there and pick it up. I'm curious to see what it's like. I'll be on the lookout for issues like ring shake.
     

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