Dipping for a finish...

Discussion in 'Newbie' started by Jamie Straw, Mar 8, 2016.

  1. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    Way back when, one of you posted about finishing small objects (e.g., wine stoppers) by dipping them in finish and letting them hang, wicking up the finish-drip with a paper towel. I have looked and looked, can't find that post. Will the honorable party please step forward and refresh my memory? TIA!
     
  2. Grant Wilkinson

    Grant Wilkinson

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    I'm not the honourable party, but if you are looking for dipping techniques, you may want to go to penturners.org. They have a finishing forum and you can search it without being a member. I've finished pens by dipping them, and there are instructions on penturners of various methods.
     
  3. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I believe that Kelly Dunn dips bowls using a Ron Kent recipe. I don't think that he does bottle stoppers.
     
  4. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    Thanks, Grant, I'll check it out!
     
  5. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    Geez, I'd love to be able to dip bowls (was thinking more about stoppers here). I just tried dipping using a couple of drawer knobs I was getting ready to install, it worked pretty well. Not sure if it's better to use poly or lacquer for this, more experimenting I guess. Thanks.

    PS: I just spent some time reading about Kent's recipe and techniques. I'll try the soap thing on some green wood, sounds cool. But the dipping is a little to long and drawn out for moi. Tried to visit Dunn's web site, but got a Norton alert and bailed.
     
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2016
  6. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Unless you have a special reason such as working with freshly cut green Norfolk Island Pine or other wood that needs extra care to stabilize, I wouldn't bother with the dish detergent thing. I think that using dish detergent to stabilize wood is a close relative of doing the polyethylene glycol treatment or soaking in Pentacryl ... all of which are for stabilizing freshly-cut green wood. If you are making bottle stoppers then use seasoned dry wood and forget all that other mess. When I first started turning I bought a bottle of Pentacryl and soaked a small rough turned bowl in it. The result was a drab looking piece of wood that looked like it had been soaked in used motor oil. I also have two five-pound "wheels" of polyethylene glycol. I also got those shortly after I started turning. Fortunately, I came to my senses before ruining more wood with these witches brew concoctions. The bad news is that it is like a white elephant: too expensive to throw away and probably a hazardous waste anyway and nobody dumb enough to take it from me.
     
  7. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    I'm tempted to try the detergent approach with some green applewood, wouldn't bother with anything else (Madrone=Boil). Stoppers are definitely turned from dry wood, nothing else makes sense to me. Have not felt temptation to try the Pentacryl or PEG -- and your description of wood-soaked-in-motor-oil certainly doesn't make it more tempting!:p
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2016
  8. Steve Doerr

    Steve Doerr

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    Jamie, I'm a dipper, so I think I can help. I have a 5 gal bucket that I have a blend of equal parts of BLO, Danish Oil and Miniwax Wipe On Poly (oil). After I finish sanding my turnings I'll dip them in the oil blend, let them drip and then take a paper towel and wipe off any excess. Depending on the wood, I may dip it twice or even let it sit in the oil for a day. After I have wiped off the excess I then set it aside for 3 or 4 days until it is completely dry and then Beall buff it.

    For pens and bottle stoppers I use CA to finish them. I like the CA finish because it is very durable and will withstand the constant hand contact.

    Good luck and let me know if you have any other questions.
    Steve

    PS--The 5 gal buck is only about 1/2 full. I keep a lid on it so that it doesn't dry out. It's one of the plastic lidded buckets that you can get at Lowes or Home Depot.
     
  9. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    Wow, a little bit of everything, eh? Thanks! I've been making various bottle stoppers and just experimenting with finishes on them, I'll give that one a try. I've only done one with BLO and CA, don't think I did the CA quite right, wasn't as glossy as expected. Read some more (and watch videos)....try it again.:) CA isn't something I'll use a lot, I'm too sensitive to it, but for some things it'll be just the ticket methinks.
     
  10. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Since Watco Danish Oil is linseed oil, Stoddard Solvent, naphtha, and polyurethane varnish that part of the mixture could probably be eliminated and made up by increased amounts of the other two ingredients. Of course, that would require some experimentation since they don't give exact percentages of ingredients.
     
  11. KellyDunn

    KellyDunn

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    Jamie, I have a couple mixes. Both have dipping tanks. Neither do i do for bottle stoppers. To my knowledge my website is clean. I pay to keep it that way. Anyone have a problem please let me know. There is not much these days even showing on my website but hope to change that soon. kellydunnwoodturner.com General email, kellydunnwoodturner@gmail.com I was doing a rattle can lacquer on my bottle stoppers. Then got an email from David Chung from Oahu that when Guilio Marcolongo was here he touted using CA as a finish. I like it. I put it on a bit of old cotton sock after the stopper is finished and slowly spin it by hand. And keep it up till it does not soak in any more.(a small amount of sock) I hold the bit of sock in one of those things doctors use to crimp vessels etc. forget the name. 1st time out of the chute holding by hand glued my fingers together. What this will do is raise grain and have a buildup of ca glue. Wait till it hits. My suggestion is to NOT use the spritzer. If you got voids in the wood and it goes white it wont come out. It only is maybe a minute or so. Then sand the stopper flush.(by hand) I then power buff the stopper and put Ren wax and buff that. Then put it on the main metal part.
    My bowl processes are in several places. I have no secrets and share freely. If you ask a question of me please know I dont check in here very often. But do answer my emails.
     
  12. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    Thanks, Kelly, I'll check out your site for sure! I tried a BLO/CA technique presented in this YouTube video (no problems with CA sticking, but I use a tight nitrile glove anyway). Stopper turned out pretty well, but not as glossy as expected. Probably need to fine-tune technique. It's such a nice quick way to finish these smaller items! There are several different approaches to the CA treatment, as I found doing a search. Re: spritzer, I assume you mean the accelerator. Nah, not really any reason to use it for this task. Medical "crimper" = hemostat I think. I have a small one.
     
  13. KellyDunn

    KellyDunn

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    Jamie, the stopper will be dull looking. A power buff and wax will take care of that. Or any item done with ca glue then sanded to get the high spots out. But you now have a plastic finish. It will buff to a great shine.
     
  14. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    Oh, I have buffed it. I still think the finish can be improved with technique (for when I want a shiny plastic surface). I'm a bit out of commission this week with a nasty cold, but will be back experimenting in a couple days.
     
  15. Steve Doerr

    Steve Doerr

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    Jamie, I use Viva paper towels to apply my CA. I use straight CA, no BLO. I have heard a lot of people try BLO with CA and many of them seem to have had difficulty with it. I put on 20 coats of thin CA for my pens, not as many on my stoppers. I find good success after putting on the CA (10 coats sand and then 10 more coats). The key to getting a good shine is once you have the desired number of coats on is to sand with 240, 320 and then 400 to get the surface good and smooth. Be careful not to sand thru the finish. Once sanded I use micro mesh to polish the finish. Buffing is not necessary after the micro mesh, but I do buff most of the time. I learned from Alan Trout to put a small fan behind your back and use it to blow the fumes away from you. It makes a big difference it working with CA.

    Good luck.
     
  16. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    Thanks, Steve. I see MM mentioned often, in many places. Do you just do one "grit" (or whatever they call it) after the CA? It's one of those systems I've just never looked into seriously, but have been curious about. I wonder what kinds of problems folks have with the BLO-followed-by-CA approach. Following what was in the video I linked, it didn't seem tricky at all. You pen guys produce the most amazing finishes (well, next to the Classic Car Guys I know).
     
  17. Steve Doerr

    Steve Doerr

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    Jamie, there are 9 "grit levels" with MM. You use all nine levels. The best is the MM that is on foam. I get mine from Wood-N-Whimsies in 3"x4" sheets and then cut them so that I get 6 out of each sheet. Like the Classic Car guys, the best results are had by wet sanding.
    The comments I have heard about BLO & CA is that it can make the finish cloudy. I don't know if that was CA put on top of BLO or if they applied them together.
    Steve
     
  18. Kelly Craig

    Kelly Craig

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    Keep in mind there is nothing special about so called Danish oil. It's nothing more than thinned poly. As such, you can replace it with just that and forego the Danish completely.

    My general rule is, if it mixes, it's fair game.




     

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