Double sided tape in turning?

Discussion in 'Newbie' started by Jesse Tutterrow, Aug 30, 2017.

  1. Jesse Tutterrow

    Jesse Tutterrow

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    In "flat" woodworking, I have used double sided tape to hold pieces together or attach templates so that I can make duplicate parts. Many times the tape will fail during use which caused parts to be damaged.

    This morning I was watching a Rex & Kip DVD where they attach a piece of wood to a metal faceplate for turning. Given the failure rate I have for double sided tape I was wondering about use in turning? The last thing I want is a disk of wood to come unattached and go flying. Is there a special type of double sided tape that woodturners use?
     
  2. Paul Lajoie

    Paul Lajoie

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    Jesse look for "turners tape" at woodcraft. Normal double sided won't hold up like turners tape will.
     
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  3. Bernie Hrytzak

    Bernie Hrytzak

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    I use Lee Valley turner's tape with great success.
     
  4. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I use Ace hardware carpet tape. I think that they have discontinued it, but I still have a supply on hand that should last for a few years. This stuff holds very well, but an essential requirement is that both surfaces must be perfectly flat especially at the perimeter ... it's OKif the center is slightly concave. There are all kinds of double sided tape. The carpet tape that I use is extremely thin and sticks like duct tape. Never use the foam type double sided tape.
     
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  5. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    I use it on occasion. There are many different tapes.
    Be sure to us a woodturning tape. As mentioned above plus craft supplies.

    The "p" in psa stands for presure. To get a good hold you need some clamp time.

    The tailstock makes a nice clamp. I also try to find a place to leave an edge of the tape to get a release.
    In general the issue with double sided tape in woodturning is getting your piece free without breaking it.
    Since I got a vacuum chuck I seldom use double sided.
     
  6. Mark Wollschlager

    Mark Wollschlager

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    I use a carpet tape from Lowes. Very thin more of a mesh. Use the tailstock for pressure when setting the tape.
    Knock out the point or put a flat piece between the point and the work piece so you don't dent the piece too much..
    More importantly, I use it only with small pieces of fairly flat material. Pocket mirrors, pendants, etc.
    The pressure of the tool will be towards the headstock, with a minimum of 'spindle work' that puts pressure at right angles to the tape.
    I very rarely have failures, most of the time I have to be extra careful prying the work off of the tape. Oval skews are good for this ;).
     
  7. AlanZ

    AlanZ

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    You might find a video I made a while back useful

     
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  8. egsiegel

    egsiegel

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    great video as always Alan
     
  9. Clifton C

    Clifton C

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    When I first started using D/S tape, I used way too much, I guess I just didn't trust it, but then, it was no fun trying to pry the pieces apart. Key techniques, dry wood, dead flat joints and pressure, not a ton, but moderate pressure so the tape has a chance to get a grip. You can use a putty knife to help separate but I made some wedges about 3 inches long tapering from knife edge to 1/8 at the thick end. Slipped in the joint side by side with only finger pressure, first on one then the other, they move in a fraction at a time and at a certain point the tape says "ok, I give" and you feel the tape give up and the pieces come apart...no stress...
    I've used D/S tape for template routering and know to be aware of how flat the piece is, how dusty the piece is, how many times the tape can reuse before applying a new piece, how close to the line the initial piece was cut so as not to have to hog off too much wood. These are some things relatable to woodturning. It's definitely more fun to work your way up from small to large, instead of the other way around. A ruined flat piece doesn't usually fly as far as a spinning one does...
    One final tip...Don't trim your fingernails if you are about to do a demonstration using double stick tape...
     
  10. Bernie Hrytzak

    Bernie Hrytzak

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    On small delicate turnings , I have used a micro-wave to soften the glue for easier separation. Depending on the size, a few seconds shou;d do it. But, you need to experiment with your own micro-wave.
     
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  11. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    What are the pros and cons between double sided tape and using hot glue?
     
  12. Bernie Hrytzak

    Bernie Hrytzak

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    Hot melt glue might be stronger for larger pieces, however it is harder to remove unless it is in a sacrificial area. You can design the temporary joint such that the glue is turned off just prior to full separation of the joint. The glue also fills imperfections in the wood so a flat surface is not madatory. The tape requires flat surface contact.The double sided tape is easier to remove but it leaves residue which can be wiped off by rag dipped in varsol.
    Tape might not stick to some surfaces as well as glue, for instance end grain.
     
  13. john lucas

    john lucas

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    Bernie did a great description of the pros and cons. One trick I found with hot glue is to glue the edges. I find that holds better than putting glue on the face of a wasteblock and then sticking the two together. A combination of the two is really strong. I do many of my platters with double stick tape (the turners variety) I also find it fantastic for smaller things like jewelry and pendants. I find that if you apply the tape, put the parts together and then apply pressure for 15 seconds or so you get a much stronger bond. To break the bond I either push a thin knife through the joint if it doesn't matter if I get some scratches, or I use my wire burning tool like a Garret and sort of saw through the tape or hot glue. I find an E guitar string with wooden handles works great for this.
     
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  14. odie

    odie

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    My input to this thread is minimal, but I can state positively that the premium cloth backed D/S tape does work well for small bowls. If you have the time, and are using a waste block, Titebond glue is a better way to go. I don't think I've used D/S tape this century to hold a small bowl......but, I do use it EVERY time I glue a waste block to a block of wood. I apply a couple very tiny (about the size of a pea) to the waste block, then cover the entire surface with Titebond. After applying the Titebond, I pry the little paper backing from the D/S tape, exposing it. I then clamp. The purpose of the little pieces of D/S tape is to keep the mating surfaces from drifting while I clamp.......works like a charm!

    Other than that, the D/S tape has become a great shop helper, and I mostly use a few pieces between joints just prior to drilling screw holes. It keeps the two surfaces together well enough to drill and finish up with the screws......works great there! :D

    -----odie-----
     
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  15. egsiegel

    egsiegel

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    Spray hot melt glue with Denatured Alcohol...it softens it and makes it much easier to release the piece.
    Helps with tape too.
     
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