Drying Maple

Discussion in 'Tutorials and Tips' started by glenkey, Jan 15, 2011.

  1. Dean Center

    Dean Center

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    Bozeman, MT
    Where does one go to sign up for this study? I want to be a good citizen and advance science. :cool2:
    Dean Center
     
  2. MichaelMouse

    MichaelMouse

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    May 16, 2005
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    All the information required for an intelligent approach to drying our shapes is available in the work cited. We just have to have the intelligence to use it. Since you can't copyright a government work, I have included a visual aid from the work below. Those of us who deal with green lumber recognize immediately the affect of annual ring orientation on direction, and species on distance without reference to the guide. Those who have not yet made the connection between rings and shrink might want to go look about their roughs and compare pattern to direction. Or take it to the Borg and look at those construction grade pieces which were kilned to ~20% once and dry down indoors.

    As to boiling and other mythical methods to accelerate curing of green wood, rest assured if there was time to be saved it would be a standard method in industry, where time is money and the apparatus to employ the method can be amortized. Exotic timbers of high value involve some pretty sophisticated or complicated methods of drying, none of which involve complete immersion. Cherry and walnut are routinely steamed in an attempt to equalize color, but the rest of the schedule is not abbreviated. Quick reading of the literature cited reveals that the structure of wood features ventilated cells which do not rupture, and a cellulose/hemicellulose construction that adsorbs and holds water to itself by hydrogen bonding. Boiling does not affect the number of available sites. While elevated temperature may allow the lignin ties that bind to relax a bit, relieving some growth stress, comparison to the visual aid reveals that the basic structure still moves things in the same direction as if it were not boiled.

    SWMBO, when asked how her husband is, is wont to reply "compared to what?" Same with accelerated methods of drying. Too many people cling to the year per inch fiction used for air drying planks in unheated New England barns, and use it a the point of comparison to their method. Once again, the scientists have figured the rate of loss from end grain, and it's 10-15 times the rate of loss from face grain. Means one thing in a ten foot board, something entirely different in a shape that puts every place within an inch of open air through endgrain.
     

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