Dust Collection

Discussion in 'Woodturning Health & Safety' started by MarkAndrews, Jan 24, 2017.

  1. MarkAndrews

    MarkAndrews

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    I hope it's OK to post 2 topics in a row...I know there have been several threads regarding this topic over the past couple of years. I have read them and I'm still somewhat confused. My situation is this. I have no dust collection system in place to speak of. I have what I thought was a good industrial style dust collector (see the attached picture), but I haven't installed the duct work. After reading Bill Pentz's articles on dust collectors I don't think what I have is adequate or safe.
    Honestly, I would like to do this once and do it right. I'd be willing to pay an engineer or a company to design and install a proper system. Several people have recommended Oneida, I've also seen the Felder RL series recommended, I'm hoping someone can make the case for one of those or another alternative. I live in Southern California where my neighbors practically sit on top of me, so unless the unit I purchase takes up the same footprint as a couple of trash cans, putting the DC outside is not an option. If I did put it outside, it would have to be fairly quiet or put in an enclosure that would muffle the noise. If I put the DC inside my shop (it's a 3 car garage with no cars:)) then footprint is still very important because I have limited space. The DC would need to service a PM66 tablesaw, 20in Bandsaw, Nova Lathe, chop saw and a joiner.
    I don't want to throw money away, but I also want to do this right and do it once. If I haven't provided enough information, please let me know. All suggestions and advice are appreciated.
    Thanks,
    Mark Andrews
     

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  2. Greg Joseph

    Greg Joseph

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    I installed a 5 hp Onieda Dust Gorilla about 3 years ago. I put it outside of my shop in a simple enclosure. Onieda designed the duct work and I did the installation myself. I would never put a dust collector in my shop as the noise is terrific and I do not care to inhale the dust that is not trapped by the filter.
     
  3. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    The only downside of putting it outdoors is that you will be drawing outdoor air into the shop to replace the air exhausted through the dust collector. If the shop is being heated or cooled this will run your heating/cooling cost up. Oneida has always been very highly rated in magazine reviews. If you think that noise is a problem then you could build an enclosure to help muffle the noise. I can't tell from the picture what sort of DC you have currently.
     
  4. Greg Joseph

    Greg Joseph

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    True, outside air is a concern but space in the shop is also. I built my enclosure with a wall common to my shop. When air is exchanged it comes back to the shop through an opening in the wall that is slightly larger than the intake for the collector. The opening in the wall also has a filter for the return air. I use a set of "allergy" filters to cover the opening. Even though the Onieda has a "hospital grade" filter, the wall opening filter collects an amazing amount of dust and fine particulate. So, in my opinion, an enclosure for your collector can help to reduce exposure to harmful particulate.
     
  5. Gerald Lawrence

    Gerald Lawrence

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    Mine is a great deal like what Greg described, except it is in the attic. I would suggest what ever you do get get a canister filter on it. My Grizzley had a bag on it and lots of dust went thru it so I finally got a canister filter. Not only did the canister catch almost all the dust it also increased the air flow.

    Lots of talk about the vortex design and I found an article on putting a wok in the return bag to cause a vortex and decrease the amount of dust going into the filter. That is something down the road for you depending on what you buy.
     
  6. Tom Albrecht

    Tom Albrecht

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    X 2 on the Onieda. I have the 5hp model as well. Unfortunately mine is in my basement shop which adds noise. If I had a ground floor shop I would definitely have built an enclosed shelter. Greg's return air idea above is excellent.

    CORRECTION: Mine is a 3HP Onieda. Off the 8" main run I have a 6" drop to a floor sweep and the table saw w/ separate gates, a 6" drop to the Woocraft dust hood at the lathe, a 7" drop to the dual port bandsaw with a 4" connector to the 12" disc sander.
    Ear muffs required.
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2017
  7. davehu

    davehu

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    hot springs, ar
    I've had a Delta 1.5hp for 13 years with a cannister filter. My shop (24x24) has similar machines to yours. I have pvc pipes to each tool and use PSI Lone Ranger system with switches attached to each blast gate. It turns on whenever I open a blast gate. Works great. Having said that after recently seeing a Jet 1.5hp cyclone I just sold my Delta and am upgraded to the Jet cyclone. I'll have it installed in a few days. A big draw was it's small foot print, just 37" x 22".
     
  8. Hy Tran

    Hy Tran

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    If you are by yourself in the shop, 5hp of dust collection is probably overkill. Think about layout, and perhaps moving the DC from machine to machine (remember, large diameters, short runs, smooth walled...)

    In the Oneida line, I considered the "roll-able" units (dust gorilla portable), but eventually settled on a 3hp fixed system. I only turn on the DC when I sand (or when I'm using the bandsaw; I don't have a table saw anymore). Where I am, I need to recycle shop air unless I want a horrendous heating bill, so I use earmuffs when the DC is on.

    At sea level, using "1-machine-at-a-time", a 2hp system is likely to provide sufficient flow against the various head losses etc. (I have 3hp because my shop is at 9400 ft altitude--my longest run is to the bandsaw; my lathe is a pretty short run, and sucks quite well with the Woodcraft large dust hood on a stand).

    I used the spreadsheet on Bill Pentz's site to calculate each of my runs to make sure the motor curve at 2hp would provide sufficient flow against the head loss, and up-sized the motor to 3hp for altitude.

    I really like having a floor sweep, but be careful not to shove too many chips quickly into the floor sweep. It is possible to clog a cyclone (don't ask me how I know that).

    Some folks also:
    • Recommend having a standalone air cleaner on a timer that recirculates and cleans the shop air;
    • Wearing a respirator
    • Jerry Kermode has a custom system where he runs a duct from his house into his shop that blows clean air into his face shield (kind of like the virus movies where the biologists have suits with air hoses). Voila! He's always breathing clean air. Who cares about everyone else in the shop!
     
  9. Ron Rutter

    Ron Rutter

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    Gerald. Bill Pentz cylone design has a ramp in it that directs the fines to the outside where they drop into the drop box. Very efficient. When i built the one for our seniors shop i enlarged the discharge pipe which further reduced the discharge velocity
     
  10. olaf Vogel

    olaf Vogel

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    Not to be factious, but I think that's the point of Bill's write up....
    scare you a bit, so you buy the best.

    There's a ton of great info there, and it looks like DIY, but pretty high end.

    Bill explains how to create a "perfect" system - which I doubt anyone has.
    Keep in mind, that almost any DC solution is better than none.
    :)
     
    Tom Albrecht likes this.

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