faceshields

Discussion in 'Woodturning Health & Safety' started by gran, Oct 22, 2006.

  1. gran

    gran

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2005
    Messages:
    116
    Location:
    Dothan, Alabama
  2. Brodie Brickey

    Brodie Brickey

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2004
    Messages:
    128
    Location:
    Long Beach, CA
    Home Page:
    Face Shield Choices

    I haven't used either of those masks. I originally bought a regular hard hat and attachable face shield for my wood turning. It won't handle a 50 lb big block of wood coming at me, but everything else will be fine. With a block that size, I should really know what I'm doing, have the tail stock up to support and all the other things. The shield will keep my face from being torn up, but it won't keep me from breaking bones.

    I've recently purchased a chainsaw hat/shield/ear muff combination (Stihl $42.00) in my area. It handles the noise from the dust collector, the sander and those other noises. I would recommend going this route until you're ready to pony up the big bucks for a Trend airshield or something similar which will also filter out small dust particles. You can also use it with your chainsaw, or take the shield off and where it when you're operating your other machinery.

    The only alternative option I've seen that might work better, is the hockey mask with a clear shield on it. They do sell them but you're talking about $85 or so by the time you count face shield and helmet. You also have the issue of fogging, but you have that with everything except a Trend or similar mask that pumps air onto your face.

    Brodie
     
  3. dkulze

    dkulze

    Joined:
    May 29, 2004
    Messages:
    995
    Location:
    billerica, ma
    I could not bring up a picture on either but can offer quick advice. What you want is a basic faceshield available at any decent hardware store that has a hard polycarbonate shield. The ones with thin, flexable sheilds won't work for woodturning. They protect fine for chips and dust but, when that chunk of wood cuts loose unexpectadly, you want solid plastic between you and it.

    Example: Two weeks ago, while demonstrating at the local state fair, a nice piece of hard maple with a small bark inclusion came apart on me. Turns out the small bark inclusion expanded immediately below the surface and completely split the block of wood except for about 1/4 inch all around, so as to not be visible at any point but that one. I had only gotten as far as roughing it round when I cut away sufficient wood for it to come apart. I'm estimating that about 2lbs of wood came off at 800 rpm. Hit me square in the faceshield, deformed the headstrap until the edge of the shield hit my forehead leaving a shallow cut, and flinging it completely off my head. Rang my bell a bit and scared the crap out of me but didn't hurt me.

    Soft faceshield would have likely ended with a broken nose and good possibility of broken orbital/cheek/skull, not to mention possibility of blinding myself or getting a concussion.

    Doesn't take fancy or expensive to save you, just solid. You're better off with a $15 solid faceshield from Home Despot than a $400 filter/shield combination with a thin face.

    Dietrich
     
  4. Steve Worcester

    Steve Worcester Admin Emeritus

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2004
    Messages:
    2,629
    Location:
    Plano, Texas
    Home Page:
    None of them will save you from the 50lb block, but they might blur the line between life and death.
     
  5. TurningDog

    TurningDog

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2006
    Messages:
    197
    here here on the difference between lifeand death. Use your tailstock and a near zero starting point when turning anything that big. And if you don't have a near zero starting point you have no business turning anything that big in the first place.

    It is good to be back from post surgery vacation.
     
  6. gran

    gran

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2005
    Messages:
    116
    Location:
    Dothan, Alabama
    I currently have a faceshield but it tends to distort things a bit. i was hoping that a different style would be better. I'm not trying to turn the 50 lbs chunks but still I would like to keep my nose pointing in the same direction it is now :D
     
  7. PapaDoc

    PapaDoc

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2004
    Messages:
    124
    Location:
    Atlanta, Georgia
    More and more experienced turners are urging, pleading with folks to use full face protection. Dave Lancaster, Al Stirt, Bill Grumbine....all light years in front of me in skill and all recommending....demanding use of full face shields in their classes.
    I think I get it.
     
  8. TurningDog

    TurningDog

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2006
    Messages:
    197
    Full face protection isn't all that expensive either. a good OSHA aproved polycarbonate shield with replaceable shield can be had at HF for about $13 or 1/2 that on sale. This is the same one that sells at loews and Ace hardware for over $25
     
  9. gran

    gran

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2005
    Messages:
    116
    Location:
    Dothan, Alabama
    I use them when I turn and a good bit at work but... All the ones I've used have a lot of distortion when I look through them. Is there a better one for that?
     
  10. TurningDog

    TurningDog

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2006
    Messages:
    197
    are you wearing glasses underneath? I have prescription safety glasses I wear and don't have any perceptible distortion. Faceshield distortion is often a sign you need glasses or don't have the right script for them.
     
  11. Gil Jones

    Gil Jones

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2005
    Messages:
    194
    Location:
    Lake Seminole, Georgia
    My Trend seems to be rather free of distortion,
    at least in the normal line of vision.
     
  12. Mark Mandell

    Mark Mandell

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2004
    Messages:
    2,542
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Let's remember that if that blank (5 or 50 lbs) is going to launch, centrifugal force will put its line of travel at about 90* to the axis of the lathe. Now why in the world a turner would be standing there is sort of beyond me. I work from the tailstock end or from the opposite direction. I never, NEVER, stand in that Launch Zone. Yes, I've had pieces dismount. Yes, I was wearing a shield. But the shield didn't help or hurt because the piece went past me rather than through me. Interestingly, I've never had a big "chunk" (50-150 lbs) let go, I'm sure because that tailstock is always engaged until the very last. My launches have been for vacuum failure and a fractured waste block that separated leaving a piece in the chuck and my piece in several pieces on the floor.

    The flip-up lexan shield has been fine for me to keep chips and heavy shavings out of my eyes and nose. If you want to go the body armor route and pay the big bucks ($500-1,000) for ventilated hard hats to make yourself feel safer, that's probably fine as it will boost your self confidence. Just don't think they really protect you more than my $20 job if you insist on standing in the line of fire and don't use your tailstock.

    mm
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2006
  13. gran

    gran

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2005
    Messages:
    116
    Location:
    Dothan, Alabama
    I do wear glasses underneath as well. I'm still learning to deal with the curse of bifocals so that could be part of it. :cool2:
     
  14. Griesbach

    Griesbach

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2005
    Messages:
    391
    Location:
    Oshkosh, WI
    Ahh...the curse of bifocals, Gran. Are you also relearning how to go down stairs? :D
     
  15. Bill Grumbine

    Bill Grumbine

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2005
    Messages:
    419
    Location:
    Kutztown PA
    Home Page:

    I mentioned this when I was down in GA last week and where I got to meet PapaDoc (David) for the first time, although we have corresponded many times in the past. Cheap shields are fine for most things, and I like to compare the more expensive shields to insurance deductibles and the pain and suffering of reconstructive surgery, dentalwork, etc. I personally know several people who have gone through that process because they did not think it would happen to them.

    A good face shield is imperative, because there is always that chance of something going wrong, no matter how well we prepare. It is cheap compared to the cost of having your face rebuilt, not to mention the huge embarrassment of advertising for all to see that you got smacked by a piece of wood. And of course, that still does not mention the pain and suffering involved, as well as having to eat your dinner through a straw for weeks on end.

    I use an Airstream air helmet now made by 3M. It is old enough that mine was built by Racal. I paid something like $525 for it almost nine years ago. It is even more expensive now. But, that cost is amortized over those nine years, and even counting replacement parts, it is still very much worthwhile. It was not easy for me to afford then, and still not now, but I would not be without it. I don't think it is the only choice, but it is the nicest as far as I am concerned.

    Students who come to me are required to use at least a shield available at the local woodworking or big box stores. I have even gotten thank you notes from a couple who wrote several weeks or months afterward to tell me that the shield had prevented injury for them.

    I don't know anything about the ones mentioned in the OP, but some sort of shield is essential.

    Bill
     
  16. Bill Grumbine

    Bill Grumbine

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2005
    Messages:
    419
    Location:
    Kutztown PA
    Home Page:
    Does that come with breathing protection too?
     
  17. Mark Mandell

    Mark Mandell

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2004
    Messages:
    2,542
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Sort of. The breathing protection recommended by the ENT specialist I consulted for a sinus infection, namely a quantity of simple filter masks with the rubber band things, came in the same box. However, they were sold separately and batteries were not included.
     
  18. NBHowe

    NBHowe

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2006
    Messages:
    35
    Location:
    Berkley, Ma
    I use the Aircap II from Woodcrafters, it has built in air filters and a face shield. Cost around $180. Used it for about 2years now, will not turn on my lathe without it. It gives me clean air a good amount of face protection.
    Nigel
     
  19. Gil Jones

    Gil Jones

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2005
    Messages:
    194
    Location:
    Lake Seminole, Georgia
    Bifocals

    Gran, I too wear bifocals, and I have found that all I need to do is tell my eye Doc (Denny Vision in Dothan) the distance that I want the near vision to focus at (in my case I ask for 19"), and I do not have to get so close to the spinning wood to see it clearly.
     
  20. gran

    gran

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2005
    Messages:
    116
    Location:
    Dothan, Alabama
    Thanks Gil. They already have my info on file. Maybe they can make me some without another visit. I've been doing the bifocal thing for a while but some parts of it(walking etc) are still a challenge some days. :cool2:
     

Share This Page