faceshields

Discussion in 'Woodturning Health & Safety' started by gran, Oct 22, 2006.

  1. Bernie Weishapl

    Bernie Weishapl

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    Gil and Gran wait till you get trifocals. Actually I got trifocals for working on a computer all the time (which is 19" to 24" away and progresive lens) and find that they work rather well for wood turning.
     
  2. bonsaipeter

    bonsaipeter

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    Face Shields

    A sales rep. for safty equipment gave me a UVEX Bionic full face shield. I like it a lot and use it. It is light weight on the head and yet very sturdily made and should protect you well from most flying debris. Visibility is very good and it is comfortable. I would strongly recommend it.

    Peter Toch
     
  3. pfduffy

    pfduffy

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    Face protection

    The ultimate protector is a welders mask! You can see thu the little window quite well and be completely unafraid. Years ago, when I knew nothing of turning, I had the priveledge of using my welders mask and it saved me many an injury. Try it for fun and pleasure, and relaxation! Phil
     
  4. Joe Fisher

    Joe Fisher

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    Further remember that when a piece launches, a tool is usually involved. It can lever the piece in almost any direction, especially a small to medium sized peice, like if you're parting into a piece between centers - you leave a small tenon and finish with a saw, right? Then you accidentally go a little deeper than you meant to, the piece binds on the parting tool and the two halves go off in different directions, one at your forehead.

    Just saying that no matter where you stand, a faceshield is still a required piece of equipment :) I know you weren't implying otherwise in your post, I just want to make sure it doesn't get interpreted that way.

    -Joe
     
  5. Frank Alvarez

    Frank Alvarez

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    No one has mentioned the use of the metal cages that come with several of the lathes. I have a clear plastic enclosure under the cage( made from a big pretzel bottle, so I can see thru it) that is attached to my vacuum system so it collects the chips and dust as well as protects my fragile parts from flying chunks. I also wear goggles with this set up. It seems to work pretty well and seems safe. Comments?
     
  6. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    The Jackson shield seems to have a major problem in that it does not cover the forehead. Also, in case of an impact there is no structural attachment to the head to absorb the energy -- only the elastic strap and the shield around the eyes.

    Bill
     
  7. Mark Mandell

    Mark Mandell

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    I wear a face shield whan anything is spinning on the lathe; even while sanding.

    :D
     
  8. dkulze

    dkulze

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    Had that conversation with someone yesterday. When sanding, there's always the possibility that a catch, a slip, or simple persnickityness of the piece of wood will result in a blowup. Be smart. Keep the shield on till the lathe's stopped.

    Dietrich
     
  9. Mark Wollschlager

    Mark Wollschlager

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    I use a face shield or my triton helmet most of the time.
    Its a good thing.

    I saw this maskhttp://www.garrettwade.com/jump.jsp?itemType=PRODUCT&itemID=107272
    in the new Garrett wade catalog.
    Don't know if it is a really good idea or a compromise of a good idea.
    A face shield with a wire mesh body and a plastic insert at eye level.
    It might help with the voice muffling mask syndrome during demos.

    Mark.
     
  10. dkulze

    dkulze

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    All I can picture is the lower edge of the eye shield cutting into my nose as it directs the chunk of wood downward to break my front teeth.

    Dietrich
     
  11. bowlman

    bowlman

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    Face Shields

    I am gladdened by this thread in that I have advocated face protection ever since AAW was formed. I own and regularly use the Racal (now 3M) Airstream ... hardhat, hard face shield and clean air run by battery. The only time I don't use it is when I am turning dripping wet wood ... then I use a substantial face shield sine I don't have the dust to worry about.

    I have also been heartened by hearing that many of the "big guns" have begun insisting that everyone wear face shields.

    Besides, when I wear a face shield it serves 2 purposes ... it protects my face and protects anyone who is watching me by shielding their eyes from my ugly mug! :cool2:
     
  12. blackhorse

    blackhorse

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    How can I tell if the shield is polycarbonate? There is no wrting on my face shield.

    Is the Trend shield polycarbonate?

    BH
     
  13. underdog

    underdog

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    I gots a question about a Triton

    I purchased a (slightly) used Triton from a buddy over on another site. It was in good condition except for a few marks I'll eventually buff out of the faceshield.

    The ONLY thing I do not like about it is the fact that the air supply is anemic. If you compare specs with the Trend and other respirators, the airflow from the Triton comes out way on the bottom of the scale.

    My question:

    Is there a way to increase the airflow on the Triton?

    I find myself fogging the shield much more often in this colder weather now. I have resorted to propping the shield fractionally open with some Romex wire just to keep the flow going. But that tends to let wood shavings and sawdust in....
     
  14. dkulze

    dkulze

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    Blackhorse,

    If the shield is preshaped and moderately thick, it is likely polycarbonite. Moderately thick means approx 1mm or more, though the 1mm ones are kinda flimsy.

    Dietrich
     
  15. Mark Wollschlager

    Mark Wollschlager

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    Did you get the airflow tester with it, a clear plastic tube with a white ball in it. If so, check the air flow. That checks the blower and filters.
    It may be the filter cartridge needs replacement.
    I have also read that where the hose joins the helmet in the back might be kinked, decreasing the airflow.

    Mark.
     
  16. Jake Debski

    Jake Debski

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    If the filters are clean and the airflow tester shows airflow to be OK check the helmet. The exaust end, at the front of the helmet, may have gotten squeezed down somewhat. I've had that problem with mine and had to reopen the port. The newer Tritons have improved hoses from fan pack to helmet so if yours is older you should also check for a crushed or kinked hose.
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2006
  17. gran

    gran

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    I decided to risk ordering on of Jacksons "the Shield"

    It leaves a lot uncovered.
     

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    Last edited: Nov 3, 2006

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