Few questions on turning first bowl

Discussion in 'Newbie' started by Fadi Zeidan, Jul 6, 2016.

  1. Fadi Zeidan

    Fadi Zeidan

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    hello all,

    I took one day class where we turned one bowl blank and applied friction finish on it. That got me hooked and wanting to do it as a hobby on weekends.

    I purchased Delta 46-460 midi lathe, couple of chucks, and Harrison Specialties carbide tools since I haven't learned how to use gouges yet.

    First bowl I attempted to turn failed because I roughed the outside and left it overnight in the garage. I learned my lesson.

    Now...

    I went back and watched many videos and read everything I could read on the subject.... I am not at a point where I will be getting logs and milling them, so I'm buying blanks off of eBay to turn. We will see how that goes.

    My plan is to:

    1. Rough out a 6x3 walnut bowl using the 10% rule and spray it in water every now and then since I am still slow at turning
    2. Place it in paper bag and set it aside to dry
    3. Come back to it and finish it after it dries and apply a finish

    Sounds simplistic, but I have few questions if someone can answer any of them, or correct my approach...

    1. The drying time is taking the fun out of seeing my first bowl complete... As a hobby, I won't see the results for months which is disappointing. Any recommendations? I thought about doing the DNA bath method, or buying kiln dried blanks too but not sure what would you guys recommend
    2. For drying, do I leave the bag in the garage, covered patio, or a closet inside the house? I live in San Antonio, TX and it is around 100 degrees outside right now, 74sh inside depending how cold the wife is
    3. I've seen videos where people applied anchor sealer befor bagging their work, is that the way to go?
    4. I've seen people apply sanding sealer then waxing their bowls right away, no twice turning. I assume that is for dry turned blanks?
    5. Any other advice?
    Thanks :)
     
  2. Douglas Ladendorf

    Douglas Ladendorf

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    If you want to see results right away buy dry wood. Air dried is a bit nicer to turn. If twice turning I just throw it in a paper bag and leave it on the floor by the lathe.

    Best thing you can do getting started is to find a turning club in your area and join. Turners are generous folks, especially when it comes to helping someone learn.
     
  3. Steve Worcester

    Steve Worcester Admin Emeritus

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    Use mesquite. It will dry at a 1:1 ratio tangentially and radial as long as there is no sap wood. One of the only ones to do that.
    But while you are in a hurry to get something as a result, I would say get as much wet blanks as possible, turn a bunch or wet bowls to 10% thickness, then turn a bunch more. Then some more. You can cover them in anchor seal and put them out of direct draft and sunlight and most will be ok. But those that will crack are usually
    • Species prone - like fruit woods
    • Have inclusions or branch lets or the heart, knots, etc
    • Are oak
    And when you get your gouge skills down, then you'll have a bunch of dry bowls you can re-turn and give out as gifts.

    And btw, wet walnut, oak and mesquite are going to rust a lathe overnight if you don't do a good job of wiping it down before retiring for the night.
     
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  4. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    From what I've heard and experienced, the details as to using bags during the drying process vary from one climate to another. With all due respect to Douglas, I've never heard of putting the green bowl in a bag and just leaving it there -- perhaps he lives in a climate where that works. Most people I've talked to who do bags, change them periodically. Here in the Great Northwest/Puget Sound, bag drying is most likely to create a moldy mess. In an arid climate, probably works fine. Places in between, a process in between.:) Something Steve mentioned is very important -- using Anchorseal or one of the store-branded sealers. My bowl mentor usually just seals the end grain on his bowls and the rims, and I've been doing the same -- so far so good, and uses less than sealing the whole thing. I do, however, seal the whole thing if it's a bowl I'm worried about, e.g., fruitwood with inclusions and branchlets and knots such as the cherry I brought home last weekend. After you've turned and dated the bowl, weight it every few weeks (a digital scale is about $20 at Amazon) and keep track. When it stays stable, it's ready to 2nd-turn.

    It is hard to wait for a bowl to dry, so like Steve said, turn a bunch of 'em! Fill in some of the time with dry bowl blanks (a moisture meter is a necessity, IMHO, to make sure they're really dry). Try some spindle stuff too! All of this turning will advance and solidify your skills.
     
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  5. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    Geez, mine started rusting before I got the 2nd bowl off Monday -- cherry. Just a dusty reddish look, but well on its way. Used some brass wool and WD40 before closing up shop. Even after wiping it down, the WD40 must have left some protection because things didn't go downhill so fast on the next bowl, which was much bigger. Do you think silicone spray would protect the steel?
     
  6. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    Drying bowls in paper bags. I Keep the bagged bowls in a room with RH 50% in place that has some air circulation but not in front of a fan or vent. The bags get damp for 5 days or so. I move the bowl to dry bags every day. Reusing the bags from the day before. Left in damp bags the bowl will get mold. Once the bags are not damp to the touch I put the bagged bowl on a shelf for 4-5 months. Then take it out of the be and dry it for another couple months. You can weigh it every month and when The weight is the same it is dry.
    We have humidity in Florida so outside doesn't work.

    A couple of things to consider.
    1. Contact the. Alamo Woodturners. They are a local chapter of AAW.
    http://www.woodturner.org/members/?id=23094257

    2. You might consider doing a green wood turning. A bowl made with an even 1/4" wall thickness can be dried in a paper bag for 2-3 days, then on a shelf for a day, then sanded and finished.

    Al
     
  7. Gerald Lawrence

    Gerald Lawrence

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    Good advise so far and remember almost everyone dries bowls differently. I place fresh chips in bag and around the bowl in a paper bag. As Jamie said weigh the bowl and periodically reweigh. Usually after 2 weeks or thereabouts I dump the chips. My shop has AC so that may be a part of why this works for me, set to 90 degrees when closed. Note you will want to open the bag daily and may need to change bags if it is wet. Once the weight lose slows to less than 10 Grams a day (for an average 10 inch bowl) remove from the bag and continue to weight regularly. When the weight stays the same for 3-4 days it is time to return. This may not be totally dry ,however it is enough to do the finishing.

    I would say the garage in the south is not the best place. Maybe in a shady place with air circulation.
     
  8. Fadi Zeidan

    Fadi Zeidan

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    Thank you guys, I really appreciate the answers. I do plan on attending Alamo woodturners meetings, I'm looking up their schedule.

    My garage gets very hot around this time, so I will see if I can store them in the guest room in a corner. I honestly have no idea what the humidity is like indoors. I will need to see if I can figure it out.

    Also, thanks for the tip on the type of wood and rusting out. I will lookup lathe maintenance, I did not know some woods could do that :)

    I ordered two 6x3 walnuts, 8x3 Hichory, 8x3 sycamore, 6x5 spalted maple, and 11x3 spalted hackberry to try.

    I'm going to turn two walnut bowls since they are smaller and might finish them faster then let one dry naturally and the other in DNA bath and see what happens. I'll try the 1/4" thickness once I know I can get the walls consistent,maybe right after that.

    Still trying to figure out the finish, ready about sanding sealers, waxing, and minwax antique finishes.

    Hockenbery, I read your slide on turning, great info, you need to write more you have great way of communicating.

    Any recommendations on reading or watching material?
     
  9. Steve Worcester

    Steve Worcester Admin Emeritus

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    No silicone in the shop ever*.
    I don't use any silicone products, even for casting molds, because silicone will foul up most any finish. And it becomes very difficult to fix.

    Bowling alley wax, T9 Boeshield work , paste wax all work well. Generally, like drying wet bowls, there are 100 opinions on the subject.

    * my shop. Have seen armor all foul a finish several homes away and shooting high gloss expensive clears out of clean air, with clean hoses, and purified air, you have to make sure from front to back that the entire process is less foul able
     
  10. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    I use it on the pulley shaft of my lathe -- it's the only thing that doesn't foul things up such that the Reeves pulleys stop moving. It's a dry silicone, and I doubt it can escape out of the hood or through the spindle.:) I have some Glidecoat that I got to protect my steel router table top. Hated the way it went on though, perhaps I should try T9. I think, though, if I'm on a green-bowl-turning kick (one after the other) putting some dry-silicone on would be OK. It seems to have lots of solvent in it, evaporates, then I wipe down. As long as the tailstock can lock down effectively -- had a problem with that Tuesday (day after WD40), darn near killed my shoulder locking it down.
     
  11. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I like the CRC dry silicone. I have used it with discretion on some moving parts including the inner workings in chucks. I do a lot of high gloss finishing and haven't ever had any finishing problems because of the dry silicone. However, there are a lot of bad silicone lubricants around. WD-40 and Liquid Wrench silicone lubricants are both examples of the bad ones. They have a greasy feel and leave a visible residue after the VOCs have flashed off. So far, the CRC silicone is the only one that I have found that I like.

    For your lathe bed I would recommend using Johnson's Paste Wax. It works better than anything that I have tried. Rub it on, spread it thin, let it dry to a white haze, and then buff it clean with a clean cloth or paper towels.
     
  12. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    CRC - yep, that's the one.
     
  13. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    I use Balistol which lasts a bit longer than paste wax for me and is easier to a apply. I used paste wax for about 10 years until I met Don Geiger who quickly became a freind and our Balistol supplier.
    I hate the smell of Balistol so I apply it last thing before leaving the shop.
    It protects against wet wood and keeps the banjo and tailstock sliding effortlessly.
    Using it about once a week works well.
    Pump spray on. Wipe excess off with a paper towel.
     
  14. Gerald Lawrence

    Gerald Lawrence

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    Bill there is no silicone in WD-40. I have actually seen it used on wood as sanding lub.
     
  15. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Gerald, the can says WD-40 Silicone Lubricant.

    WD-40, Liquid Wrench, CRC and others all offer a wide range of products.


    [​IMG]
     
  16. Fadi Zeidan

    Fadi Zeidan

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    I believe it depend on which WD-40 you are using. The general one states:

    While the ingredients in WD-40® Multi-Use Product are secret, we can tell you what it does NOT contain. WD-40® Multi-Use Product does not contain silicone, kerosene, water, graphite, or chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs).

    http://wd40.com/faqs
     
  17. Steve Worcester

    Steve Worcester Admin Emeritus

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    WD40 has widely expanded its product line
    They went into bicycle lubes and no one can get past the WD40 name.
     
  18. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    And I thought that I made it clear in post #11 which one I was using, but apparently not. :rolleyes:

    I have a large assortment of WD-40 lubricants ranging from lubing my garage door opener to addressing the needs of squeaky wheels.
     
  19. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    BTW, they do acknowledge that they put perfume in the original WD-40. OK, they call it fragrance and not perfume, but it makes a nice after shave for macho type guys.
     
  20. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    That's a relatively new product, and is not at all like the original WD40 product that we've known for decades. BTW, I tried it on the shaft of my lathe, and it was not a good idea. Nor was the WD-40 white lithium grease. The CRC Heavy Duty Silicone turned out to be the ticket.
     

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