Few questions on turning first bowl

Discussion in 'Newbie' started by Fadi Zeidan, Jul 6, 2016.

  1. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I have a FREE can of WD-40 Silicone Lubricant for the first person to come by to pick it up. It's barely used ... and it will stay that way as long as I have it.

    BTW, Jamie, do you find that it is hard to hold onto the can of CRC silicone dry lube? The can is so slick that I am constantly dropping it.
     
  2. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    Can't say I've noticed a problem, Bill. Hmmm....an acetone cleaning? Or a shelf-liner cozy would work.:D
     
  3. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Well, I managed to get the dry lube on my hands one day, then handled the can. Ever since that, the can is constantly slipping out of my hand.
     
  4. john lucas

    john lucas

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    Lots of info here. Most of us just use off the shelf WD-40 lube our lathe beds and tool rests. If your going to turn Oak and leave it in the chuck put a good wax on the chuck before you start. It will rust it if left overnight.
    If you rough turn bowls on a regular basis when 6 months comes around you will always have a dry bowl sitting on the shelf waiting to be turned, To get buy the first 6 months I suggest roughing out a bowl, put it up to dry and then turn a thin green wood bowl like Al suggested. Of if you have a table saw just glue up some wood to the proper thickness or get into segmented turning.
    Everyone has to find what works for them in their environment. I find I can rough turn a bowl, put it in a paper sack and never worry about it, here in Tennessee stored in my shop. I moved and my rough turned bowls will now be stored in a very humid shed. I'm going to have to relearn what I can and can't do.
     
  5. stu senator

    stu senator

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    I find that a dry lube TEFLON SPRAY works and does not have the drawback of silicon spray.

    I get it in the box store, but it may be difficult to find in all the stores. I think that the last one i got was from Lowe's.

    Stu
     
  6. Gerald Lawrence

    Gerald Lawrence

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    Bill I am just old school and to me there is only one WD40. I try not to go into stores much. This is as confusing as when the makers of Mylanta started calling several other (renamed) products Mylanta also.
    I think it is all a sales gimmick ........you buy one and get home and what do you get........you have to go back to get the other one.
     
  7. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Sounds like my pharmacist. He says laudanum and quinine are all you need. I think that those were the only two medications that Doc Adams prescribed for Festus Haggen for whatever malady he was suffering from in the TV western series, Gunsmoke. :D
     
  8. Fadi Zeidan

    Fadi Zeidan

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    Thanks all for all the help :) I was able to rough out 3 bowls. I'm using DNA bathing on the roughed out bowls and it is going great, no cracking/checking, wood is warping as expected, weight is stabilizing. I also did one to finish without drying just to see a finished product, it warped a bit so far but no cracks. I am making some mistakes, but it is fun process.

    I have couple of questions though:

    1. I had my first "chuck stuck on lathe" experience. I struggled to get it off and almost gave up when it finally came loose. What do you guys do to prevent this from happening?
    2. I wanted to try spalted wood, tried Maple and Hackberry but stopped right away and bagged them till I figure out what is wrong. I cannot get smooth cuts on the end-grains, I am having pretty bad tear outs. I am using fresh inserts on carbide tools, even small/slow cuts is causing bad results. Should I use wood hardener on spalted wood? I'm switching to other types for now, but it is an interesting challenge for me.
     
  9. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    I tighten the Chuck on the spindle with a medium force. Then it unscrews with a medium force.
    If the speed up of the lathe tightened the Chuck the last little bit it can be a devil to get off.
    A 1x4 clamped in the jaws gives extra leverage when needed. A little WD40 on the threads helps too.

    Punky wood is best cut. Spalt is the early stages of rot. The wood fibers are deteriorating or punky and the fibers tend to pull and break off instead of cut. They pull out more with a scraper.

    Need to stiffen the fibers so they support the cut or scrape.
    Water will swell the fibers and often allow cutting.
    A wash coat of shellac or lacquer stiffens the fibers more than water
    CA will glue the fibers in place. Also will discolor the woos but if the CA is everywhere you won't notice it.

    Have fun.
     
  10. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I've never had that happen to me. What lathe and what chuck? Did you have any bad catches?When you put the chuck on the spindle did you spin it on with a forceful twist? I've heard that some people use a board clamped in the chuck jaws and with the spindle locked they strike the board near the end with a hammer.

    The wood might be too decayed to turn without tearout. What carbide tools are you using? Hunter carbide tools when used with the bevel rubbing ought to give a clean cut unless the wood is too far gone. Easy Wood tools are scrapers and probably can't give the quality of finish that you want.
     
  11. Fadi Zeidan

    Fadi Zeidan

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    I have Delta 46-460 midi lathe with Nova G3D chuck. I didn't tight in hard, but I did spin at high speed to see if speed was an issue with the spalted wood. I did get a catch though. It took some force to get it loose and was worried I may damage the lathe.

    I'm using Harrison Specialties carbide tools, they are similar to EWT. I will try shellac or lacquer to see if that helps. I'm also thinking of letting it tear out on the end grains and fill it with colored epoxy to see how it would look after I finish roughing it out but I have a concern that it may fall/fly into pieces while I hollow the inside. May have to apply the epoxy on the outside before I hollow the inside. What do you think?
     
  12. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    How soft is the wood?
    My test device is a flat bladed screw driver. If I can push it in with little force the wood is too soft to turn without stabilization. Stabilization costs a lot so it is not something to do unless the wood spectacular or has some intrinsic value.
    Spalted wood can be quite hard if you get it at the right moment.
    Once it has gotten too soft it isn't worth the effort.

    With experience you can tell if the shellac or liqueur thinner has a chance.
    Scraping will require harder wood.

    Al
     
  13. Fadi Zeidan

    Fadi Zeidan

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    I just tried pushing small screw driver in the blanks, there are definitely spots (1"x1" circles) in the end grain where the screw driver easily goes in deep with little force, most of the other areas seem to require much more force to poke into them. These are 6x5 and 8x3 blanks.

    BTW, I'm not concerned about these pieces to save them, I kind of put them aside and was going to forget about them, but I figured I am going to run into this issue sooner or later and trying to learn from it instead of delaying the issue.
     
  14. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    What you might try is saturate the soft spots with thin CA glue.
    Let It harden for 10 minutes or so. It may smoke and fume so good ventilation is needed.
    Then try turning it and if the rest is solid the CA treated areas should turn ok.
    The CA May not penetrate deeply so if you remove an 1/8" of wood add more CA.

    ALSO USE CAUTION.
    if there is a void in the wood it can fill with CA and the CA harden around the opening sealing in the liquid CA. IF you cut into the void the CA sprays out. Doesn't happen often but when it does, don't let it get in your eyes or ruin your day in other ways.
     
  15. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I don't think that the colored epoxy will look good. You might consider using a bowl gouge and shear cut the punky wood. Or do as Al suggested and use shellac or lacquer thinned so that it penetrates the wood.

    Here is a pretty good video on doing a shear cut with a bowl gouge:




    And, here is another one showing shear scraping which sometimes works when shear cutting doesn't:

     
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  16. Fadi Zeidan

    Fadi Zeidan

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    I ended up throwing away the spalted blank, it was too rotten to turn. I'm sticking with regular weed, so far been using walnut and sycamore.
     
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  17. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    Another method used for drying a bowl is to wrap the outside surface with saran wrap to keep the wood from drying on the outside.
    The bowl is then allowed to dry from the inside, this will reduce checks and cracking on the outside of the green bowl and speeds up the drying process.
    Depending on the humidity in your room you still might want to put it in a paper bag if you are in a real dry climate.
     
  18. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    Some heavily spalted woods require stabilizing the wood with a resin and then curing the resin in an oven. Large pieces can be a challenge and a vacuum chamber is the best method to apply the resin.
     
  19. Fadi Zeidan

    Fadi Zeidan

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    I've been having great success with DNA bath, two weeks and the rough turned bowls are ready. However, I'm also enjoying the roughing process, so I'm not in a hurry to turn them as I expected to be. So far only checks I got was near a pith around the rim of one bowl drying at the moment.

    I love the blend of wood and resin, but that is beyond my skill level at this point. I want to learn the process down the road. I'm leaning towards woods I know I can turn, black walnut and sycamore been great so far.
     
  20. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Since you're in Texas mesquite is another commonly available wood. Turn some green mesquite and you will become hooked on it. If you attend the SWAT symposium in Waco in late August it will be like a candy store ... tools, wood, demonstrations, and meeting other turners.
     

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