First Bowl

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by Lamar Wright, Aug 30, 2017.

  1. odie

    odie

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    Hello Lamar......I am envious! I love turning nice pieces of maple. Living where I do, the sources of green hardwood is pretty darn slim.......so, I've always been limited to wood that I can buy. Much of it is KD, but I still get quite a bit of harvested and waxed green wood. The shipping expense is high, too. :( Although it would be great for a learning experience, I've always avoided plain grained woods.....wanted only the best high figure wood......and, commercial sources know they are extra desirable....so, there too......the price goes up! :(

    One thing that has held true for me, is the 1/10 rule is not always the best advice. As long as you have quite a few pieces of roughed bowls in progress to be seasoned.......a little thicker is better. The overall warping is less, and there is less cracking/checking. If you can, it's better to not be in a hurry to get it on your lathe.....here, time is your friend, friend! :)

    Looking to hear from you, and others, about your learning experiences. I've found new turners are not yet completely overwhelmed with the usual accepted advice, and come up with some pretty amazing perceptions and concepts! :D

    Good day to you and all........

    -----odie-----
     
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  2. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    Turning green wood will provide plenty of turning time which will develop tool skills, however
    turning dry wood will also help in developing the other turning, sanding and finishing skills.
    Turning small segmented items allows a person to cut and glue dry wood, turn and finish
    completed items in a day or two. I also like to turn a variety of items to learn different skills
    and techniques to keep things interesting. Dry wood will provide the opportunity to turn and
    finish an item the same day, whereas a room of green turned bowls has a long waiting time
    to see any of your hard work turned into a finished item. You can also turn jigs and tools that
    you will need for your bowl finishing tasks from dry wood. Plenty of things to turn while you
    are waiting for your green bowls to dry.
     
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  3. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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  4. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

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    Hi Odie, thanks for the kind words my friend. Just got through sawing some fresh maple bowl blanks. Good advice Odie, I also believe time is my friend when it comes to green wood. And yes, I agree that thicker is better when it comes to roughing a bowl so it allows for less cracking/checking and warping. I sure will be posting my progress Odie as I enjoy getting advice from you and others in this wonderful hobby/work. By the way I saw your photo album on your Military time and enjoyed it very much. As one Viet Nam vet to another "Welcome Home My Friend". I was at Can Tho in the delta from 68-69. I was with the 191st Helicopter Co. Door gunner/crew chief on a Huey. If you were here I'd give you all the green Maple wood you could take! Happy Turning.
     
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  5. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    Only a little bit thicker. The wood must be able to move as it dries.
    If it cannot move as bowl it cracks.

    The 10% rule works pretty well as a rough measure. It does not have to be exact.
    A 7" bowl would be 3/4 inch thick. An inch should be fine. You probably get away with 1.5-2" thick wall in a 7" bowl probably get cracking if you go 3" thick in a 15" bowl
    The bottom of the bowl can be a 1/3 thinner than the rim.

    Small bowls are especially good for practicing on. You can turn them faster and they are more forgiving in the drying because the movement distance of the wood is less than on large pieces. Everything about small bowls is easier than large ones- turning, drying, getting a curve, length of time to dry.

    Also there is the drying time. Thicker takes longer.
    The 10% rule is meant to give you a round bowl inside the warped one.
    Typical 10" bowl warps to 10" x 9.5" you have a bowl with a 1/2" wall thickness.
     
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  6. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

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    Hi Mike, all of your tips that you quoted, I totally agree. I have a lot to do, while my wood is drying, that's for sure! I have turned several gigs that will be very helpful in my wood turning. As I turn things I am always thinking how a jig would help my process. I really enjoy learning new skills and being able to turn different things. All those years of turning pens was the same every day. Now, I have opened up a whole new world by turning different things and I must say it is exciting. I thank all of you that help me and others like me that are advancing our skills as woodturners to a higher level. Mike, I'll be posting projects along the way for advice from everyone. Thanks and Happy turning.
     
  7. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

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    Hi Al, so actually I could have taken a little more wood off the bottom of my bowl? I left the bowl probably an 1 1/2 " thick at the bottom.

    I do plan on practicing on small bowls. Al, I really value you and all others knowledge and tips. Someday as I learn more about turning, I hope that I can help others. Happy turning.
     
  8. odie

    odie

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    Well by golly.....imagine that! :) I very seldom have met anyone who was also a door gunner on a huey.....we seem to be a very small subset of those who served! Welcome back to you, too, Lamar. I know what it was like to do that job, and can relate. If I hadn't been 19, 20 years old during that year, and had a little more life experiences......I probably would have been a nervous wreck! :D

    -----odie-----
     
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  9. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

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    Me to Odie!! lol.
     
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  10. odie

    odie

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    Speaking of the 1/10th rule, and the drying/seasoning process.....I just weighed all my roughed bowls that are still in the process of seasoning yesterday. Most straight grained wood will warp to an oval shape (more or less) with the grain direction running through the longest dimension.

    I keep an index file card for each block of wood, and I enter the size, supplier, species, my initial cost, where the wood was harvested, seasoning times and weights, special notations, repairs, drawings during the final turning, date sold, retail price, who bought it, and anything else pertaining to one particular bowl. This roughed bowl, #1486, Claro walnut burl, has a very uneven grain pattern, and the drying/warping is a very unpredictable thing. Here the initial diameter was 8", but the wall thickness is slightly more than 1". The initial moisture content was 36%, and the bowl was roughed and anchor-sealed. The bowl is no longer round, and is drying very unevenly......having thick and thinner spots around the circumference. It was roughed on 2/24/17, and you can see that the monthly weights are still on the way down. I will not consider it stabilized until I have at least 3 months of unchanged weights.....(or +/- 5 grams, or so) During winter months, many times I'll wait for 4 consecutive unchanged monthly weights. Currently, I have about 50 bowls in the seasoning process, so I am not pressed for time.....and, can let nature take it's course in seasoning my roughed bowls. Some will take more time than others, and I don't care......the object is to season the bowl, not finish turn it as soon as possible. There are plenty of other seasoned bowls I can finish turn in the mean time.....not to mention the kiln dried stock I have in inventory.
    IMG_3099 (2).JPG IMG_3101 (2).JPG
     
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  11. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

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    Hi Odie, I am really impressed with how you catalog and weigh each green bowl. I knew that I had to have some kind of way keeping up with my green bowls after rough turning..... I had a similar catalog system with my pens except all my wood blanks were already Kiln dried when I purchased them. The #1486 is the bowl number? I numbered and cataloged each pen I turned. I like keeping an index card on each bowl and how you entered the weigh each month. All I need now is to purchase a digital scale for weighing bowls. Do you keep a record when a bowl sales? When I sold a pen I put the date it sold and person that bought it and their information. Thanks Odie for showing us how you catalog and weigh each green turned bowl. I'll be posting green bowl #2 soon. Happy turning.
     
  12. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    "so I am not pressed for time"
    Impressed with your detailed record keeping. I'm amazed at how much weight is lost from a green blank!
    I'm wondering if I live long enough to turn some green bowls. I'm at the age where I don't buy green bananas.
     
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  13. charlie knighton

    charlie knighton

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    I once received some Bradford pear log from a Turner in the Farmville area.....I was amazed at the number of rough turned blanks he had of all types of wood.....his studio was in the basement and he stored the rough outs between the joists by wood type....he used a mesh fencing to hold them up there and air flow.....I really appreciated that wood and liked his setup
     
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  14. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    charlie, interesting but the guy we bought the house from put sheetrock on the ceiling! If it wasn't such a mess, I would take it down.
     
  15. Fred Belknap

    Fred Belknap

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    John when I make a rough out I write the weight and date on the piece. When I check it I add the new weight and date. I have compared the weight of a ready to turn rough out to it's weight when it was green and come out with about 60%. This will vary by type of wood and how dry it is when rough turned.
     
  16. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    Thanks, Fred. I wonder how it would work by putting the roughed blank in a container and using something like DampRid. I use this. It's surprising how much moisture it collects over a short period of time.
     
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  17. odie

    odie

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    John, are you suggesting DampRid will cause additional moisture to release from a roughed bowl that wouldn't have otherwise occurred? Call me a bit of a skeptic here, but I doubt DampRid will pull any water content from a roughed bowl, that wouldn't have released without it.....so, I'm not seeing the point in using it. I am wrong about so many things in life, that I acknowledge that it's entirely possible I am short sighted, and not aware of the benefits of using the DampRid.......:confused:

    The whole point, and purpose of using something like anchorseal, is to reduce the rate at which moisture is released.......therefore, in turn, also reducing the likelihood of developing cracks and excessive warping. :D

    -----odie-----
     
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  18. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    I understand what you are saying and I do agree. The only thing is the DampRid would absorb the moisture. Just a thought. Thanks for your clarification.
     
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  19. RichColvin

    RichColvin

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    Never liked landing in those helicopters : I prefer to jump out ! (Though mine were Blackhawks)

    Rich
     
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  20. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

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    Hello turners, I put my first green bowl in a paper bag to start the drying process and I was just wondering could I put a rough turned second green bowl in the same bag with the first bowl? I also have a roll of brown paper, same brown paper as the brown bag is made of and I guess that could be used also?
     
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