Gradient Photo Paper

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by John Terefenko, Oct 18, 2009.

  1. John Terefenko

    John Terefenko

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    John thanks for the explanation and your last statement is right on the mark. I am trying to recognize the problems so I know what to look for. I know I will not take perfect photos because I do not have a good camera and photo equipment and frankly the time but at least the photo will have improved and I can be happy with it. If I were having a piece in a magazine I would need a professional shooting. This is just for fun and eventually hope to make a web site. I do appreciate the time you guys have given my posting. Thanks and have a great day. I am now going to a woodworking show and buy some new toys. Yea....
     
  2. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    JT, I apologize because I think that I am guilty of a malady of too many Photoshoppers -- the dreaded and well-documented Pixel-Peeping Syndrome of which there is no known cure. The most common symptom is enlarging an image to 500% to peep at individual pixels. I may have acquired this malady from a bird photography forum that I participate in. To show how far things can go to extremes, sometimes objectives there seem to be less about the subject and composition than it is about how minute the detail is in an image where even tiny barbules on feathers are expected to be clearly discernible.

    To get back on a more rational perspective, I think that your image turned out very well. Not only that, but the pen is beautiful. Something that might be noticeable to a critical eye, most likely will not be noticeable to the average person. It is the same story in most every endeavor. It exists in woodturning where you might have a tiny flaw in something that you turn, but nobody else is likely to see it except perhaps another woodturner. It might bug you that there is a tiny flaw, but it would not be seen by someone interested in buying the item.

    While a bit of post processing can be used to improve an image, often it is just a matter of personal preference. What kind of post processing to do is very subjective. It depends heavily on the subject and also on the software being used. Since I use Photoshop CS3, that is basically the only one that I am familiar with. I am afraid that writing a tutorial for using CS3 to post process an image would be a daunting task. For anyone who uses Photoshop CS3, there is a good tutorial book for beginners that I can highly recommend titled "Scott Kelby's 7-Point System for Adobe Photoshop CS3", by Scott Kelby. It is a tutorial that consists of about 21 lessons that requires about one hour each. Scott Kelby is a well known Photoshop Guru.

    Since you and John Lucas may not be seeing colors and tones exactly the same on your monitors, I thought that this might help explain things. There is always a bit of an issue with images posted on the web because until very recently web browsers have not been color management aware. What this means is that an image may look a certain way on your monitor, but completely different on another person's monitor. With the growing importance of digital imagery on the web, this issue is beginning to receive more attention and now Firefox and a couple other browsers can be set up to take advantage of color management in images. Along with setting up the browser to be color management aware, there are two other criteria:
    • the image must have an associated color profile. A profiles defines the color space that the image uses. Common color spaces are sRGB, AdobeRGB, Apple RGB, Color Match RGB, and ProPhotoRGB. The smallest color space is sRGB, but is sufficient for most everyday needs. The largest is ProPotoRGB and covers essentially the full range of human color vision, but as of yet there is no monitor that even comes close to being able to display the full gamut of ProPhotoRGB.
    • the monitor must also be "calibrated" to display colors correctly. Calibration can be done manually, but it is somewhat tedious. That is the way that I used to do it. I now have a wide gamut "professional" monitor (just a slick way of marketing something overpriced) with a colorimeter to perform the calibration. Only a Photoshopping fool would go to this kind of extreme.
    Also, I believe that John said that the image he posted was not one of his best -- I think that his main intent was to show the use of shadows. I think that he gave an excellent discussion of using shadows in images. They are essential and the challenge is to find the right balance where there is just enough shadow to provide the necessary depth to an image.

    By the way, the secret handshake to activate color management awareness in Firefox is: type about:config in the address box and then scroll down to gfx.color_management.enabled and set it to true (by clicking on it). You may receive a warning from Firefox that if you do something foolish, the world as we know it will come to an end.

    John, I am wondering if you are looking at the image while it has a profile associated with it before saving it for the web without a profile. The reason that I mention this is that I tend to agree with JT that there is clipping in both highlights and darks. The issue might be profile related if you were working in something other than sRGB before saving the image for the web. Because of the highlight clipping, the lightest parts of the pen are lacking some detail -- about 4,000 pixels have a red brightness value of 255.
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2010
  3. John Terefenko

    John Terefenko

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    Wow Bill you are out of my league now. I am lucky to be able to find the button to turn this box on. Also you are a photo buff so that is where you also have this great knowledge. I will continue to play around and see what happens but I am satisfied for now that I did up the photo taking abit. I learn so much from reading and looking at photos of things in these forums so the info is not falling on def eyes:) Thanks again.
     
  4. john lucas

    john lucas

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    He's out of my league also. I'm a shooter, not a computer person. Until 6 months ago I had a color printer who did all of my downloading. I did very little on the computer. I could do some really amateur work on my home computer and fortunately the editors took my photos and did great things with them.
    Due to budget cuts I'm now forced to do all the work including being a receptionist as well. I'm still doing the computer work by the numbers. I'm very slowly learning what these numbers mean but there is so incredibly much to learn. My boss is the computer guru and keeps everything operating accurately and tries to answer my questions but in many cases he might as well have been talking greek because that's what goes through my head.
     
  5. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Sorry, I did not mean to sound like some computer dork, but I guess that is what happens when one really is a recovering computer dork. :eek: ... and I hang out with other computer dorks, too. But, I no longer wear a pocket protector nor have tape on my glasses, nor wear pants with pockets all over the place, and no longer wear software advertisement t-shirts, so I am making progress towards normality.
     

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