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Happy New Year.....good riddance 2017

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by odie, Dec 31, 2017.

  1. JeffSmith

    JeffSmith

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    Just retired from over 35 years building a decent business using mostly Adobe software. When the subscription model was introduced, I made certain to retain a perpetual license to the last suite of apps I could. Now sitting at home with plenty of computing power and hardware to do most anything I need and compatibility with the hardware I amassed before the final curtain. I’ve given up staying ‘current’ for having the ability to do anything I want.
    From what I’ve seen, the ‘upgrades’ to the software are, more often than not, of no real benefit to producing good work. The latest and greatest doesn’t really do anything we didn’t do 20 years ago, at least in my business (commercial photography, video, graphics and writing) The hardware is pretty easy to maintain, just keep on top of the hardrives for the most part. As long as I’ve got power, should be good to go, and as long asthere’s propane in the tank, I’ve got power...
     
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  2. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    I used to love OS 360 and JCL
    Even wrote some assembly code.

    Being more mature I don’t even want to copy scripts in html.
    I like having apps and programs like PowerPoint, Access, Excel, and Qgis let let me analyze, organize, and present without the bother of wiring about the character encoding used by the disc.
    Microsoft has made bridge from the iPad to the phone to the PC ALMOST SEAMLESS.
     
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  3. Mark Hepburn

    Mark Hepburn

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    Point taken. You do have to really enjoy getting under the hood a bit with Linux don’t you? I’m certainly no power user with it, but appreciate its lower system requirements, and applications are more widely available than in the past.
     
  4. Mark Hepburn

    Mark Hepburn

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    I completely agree. The adobe upgrade treadmill is an abysmal existence for all but those who must stay current. As long as it’ll run on your hardware and driver support is there, it’s hard to justify some upgrades.
     
  5. chip nasworthy

    chip nasworthy

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    Happy New Year
     
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  6. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    I still have my slide rule from college (Class of 69/71). Does that tell you anything?
     
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  7. JeffSmith

    JeffSmith

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    Happy New Year everyone...
     
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  8. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Linux is looking better to me every time that Microsoft comes out with a new OS. From a user perspective I think that XP was the ideal UI although it was admittedly becoming a dinosaur. My idea of an ideal OS is that it should be a wallflower, but it seems like Microsoft wants using a computer to be all about showcasing the bells and whistles of the OS.

    BTW, Adobe switched to subscription software several years ago. In the long run its probably cheaper than purchasing a perpetual license, but it still sticks in my craw to pay what amounts to a ransom to access my data files.. Leased software has been the standard in industry for decades for CAD software.

    Mike, compatibility testing of updates has become a daunting task with the nearly infinite combinations of hardware and software that exists on millions of computers.
     
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  9. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    It tells me that you don't have to buy batteries. :D
     
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  10. Mark Hepburn

    Mark Hepburn

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    I agree, Bill. The OS should be a background tool like our power grid; there to enable tools. It sticks in my craw too. And other than addressable memory and use of resource heaps, XP was ideal for me too.

    It may or may not be cheaper to license, but you have to deal with feature bloat, interface changes, authentication hassles and - with Adobe in particular I find - a bunch of crap running in the background all the time. I’m constantly killing processes. And sometimes I have to reauthorize my computer and so on. I’m just glad that I’m passingly familiar with gimp, photopaint and other tools.
     
  11. Mark Hepburn

    Mark Hepburn

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    It tells me you’re smart enough to use one. I never could. :(
     
  12. RichColvin

    RichColvin

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    When our Windows laptop needed replacement 6 years ago, my wife & I made the leap to an iMac. We both have iPads, so a laptop wasn't needed anyway, & the desktop Mac is great for picture editing (I use LightRoom).

    I am an IT professional and can't believe how long I fought against this move. MacOS is significantly easier to use. My wife's only problem was unlearning the hard way to do things. And after two OS upgrades, it still works, looks, and feels the same way. We didn't have to relearn how to use something that is supposed to be a tool to make life easier.

    As for the subscription model, we are headed to a world where you have three choices:
    1. Use mainstream software and pay for it whilst using it
      • LightRoom
      • Microsoft Office
    2. Move to Mac
      • OS is free, as are upgrades
      • Photos is basic stuff, but free
      • Apple Office is free, and does almost everything a home user would want
    3. Move to OpenSource :
      • Linux has two options, and both are easy to install unless the PC is too old
        • Mint has an interface that is like Windows
        • Ubuntu has an interface that is like a Mac
      • Google makes Picasa, and there are others like GIMP.
      • LibreOffice
    The thing to watch for is the move to software you don't install on your PC, but instead access run it using a web browser. This is known as Software as a Service (SaaS), and it's where our industry is going. The annual cost to use SaaS may seem high, but hosting an application n a company's site is significantly higher ! That is why companies like SalesForce.com are doing so well.

    Good luck Odie.

    Rich
     
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  13. Mark Hepburn

    Mark Hepburn

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    Hey Rich,

    I really appreciate your comments and agree that SaaS is where business is headed, it seems. Cloud apps and virtualization fashion servers, etc. are driving cost out of companies’ IT overhead. But on a personal level, even as I have encouraged our guys to actively move into cloud storage and we have had to embrace subscription app service, I’m unwilling to put my data on other people’s servers.

    Call me a Luddite. Happy new year!
     
  14. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Happy New Year, Luddite! I was already a Luddite even before Ned Ludd. :D
     
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  15. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval

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    Happy new year!!
     
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  16. john lucas

    john lucas

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    I know almost nothing about computers, never owned a slide rule and struggle with a calculator. but I will wish everyone a Happy New Year. Maybe I will actually learn something this year.
     
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  17. odie

    odie

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    That's kinda like me, John. There are very few things in life I want to know everything I can learn about it.....and that includes woodturning! My interest in computers is pretty much the same as woodturning. What I do want to know, I only want to know what I can discover by my own initiiative, and not by methods others might more traditionally learn. I know that's a bit odd, but it IS me! o_O It is the kind of thing that makes me unique, or so I like to think about myself! :) .....others would call me crazy, completely nuts..............or at least "eccentric"!;)

    Now, my brother, on the other hand, is the kind of guy who knows all about, and still uses a slide rule.....if you can believe it! He loves his computers, and owns about a dozen of them!.....tinkers with them all the time! I probably would never own a computer, if I didn't initially have a need to buy supplies for my shop...........but, I'm glad I did, because it led to other things that I couldn't live without now. If I could only have a crystal ball, and KNOW the results of attaining knowledge prior to doing it, I'd have more control over how it would effect my own destiny......and whether we realize it, or not, just about all input does effect your course in life to some degree. OK, enough philosophy.....for now! :D

    -----odie-----
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2018
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  18. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    A bit off topic but an interesting tidbit of info- My father worked for a place that did contract R&D for companies that didn't have the staff or facilities for their own R&D. One project was a radio tower to be built on a mountain top in West Virginia. An engineer figured the sway of a 700 foot tower in a 10 mph wind- the sway for each foot! All figured with a slide rule! Dad said there were guys who could work a slide rule so fast their hands were a blur.
     
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  19. olaf Vogel

    olaf Vogel

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    I used Windohs for about 25 years, since ver 3.0. And totally agree, MS rarely fixes bugs. They just find a new UI solution to confuse you and hide the bugs.
    So I switched to Mac. After overcoming the initial learning curve I'm very happy with it.

    With hardware so cheap these days, there's no reason to keep the old boxes.
    When I was a trader, the company bought us top of the line Dell towers, about $12k each, fully loaded. When the desk got shut down, I took it home, where it heated my room for 5 years. However, my MacBook Pro is almost 10x faster at a fraction of the cost.

    The problem with Windohs is that upgrade path is so bloody hard.
    Windohs other major issue is maintaining compatibility for so many different hardware configurations.
    Which is why Mac has hardware matched to software. More expensive than generic hardware, but more reliable

    I've been a Product Manager for software for 15 years and can see both sides of the issues.
    1 - maintaining support for old products is a nightmare - its 80-90% of your operational support costs
    2 - pushing users to stay current is difficult, unless you force the upgrades. However, Microsoft does a real poor job of this.

    From the software companies point of view there's no solution that will keep everyone happy.
     
  20. Ely Walton

    Ely Walton

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    My wife and I did the same about three years ago and have not looked back. As an EE and IT guy from the early 70s (yes, I still have my Pickett slide rule in the office), I found it unacceptable that Windows is still crashing, burning, requiring reboots, and that I had to still think about things like drivers and (gasp!) even use an MS-DOS prompt from time-to-time.

    So we have a MacBook Air with nearly a TB of solid-stage storage (no moving parts - light as a feather), and a nice iMac with a big high-definition display... I quit thinking about backups - the Apple Airport Time Machine handles that automatically. And just for belt-and-suspenders, everything also goes to the Apple iCloud.

    Automatic backup was real handy about a year ago when my MacBook Air was stolen in a San Francisco trademark smash-and-grab. When the replacement arrived, I just did the restore from the Apple Airport Time Machine and all was exactly as it was before leaving home to get on the plane... Easy-peasy...

    In summary, all I can say is, "So long, Windows... and thanks for all the fish!" :cool:

    Ely
     

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