Help with first lathe...

Discussion in 'Newbie' started by David Tackett, Jul 29, 2013.

  1. David Tackett

    David Tackett

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    I am torn between buying the Delta 46-460 or the Jet 1221vs. I was just on the Home Depot site and they state the Delta has been discontinued. Does anyone know if this is accurate? Also, any recommendations on lathes in this price point would be appreciated. Under $1000.

    Thanks
    David
     
  2. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    I would give a slight edge to the jet. It has more features and I like the control position a little better.

    Both machines will be a fine lathe for
    Pens, ornaments, boxes, and small bowls up to about 10" etc.
    An 11 3/4" bowl can be turned but it gets to be tedious as the bowlnwon't turn over the tool rest banjo and you get into work arounds.

    The best buy is good used lathe but they get bought quickly..

    Between the two I would look for the cheapest.

    Have fun,
    Al
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2013
  3. David Tackett

    David Tackett

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    Thanks for the info. I would like a full size lathe, but I just can't find one in my price range that people recommend as a good lathe. I have tried to go the used route, but I just can't find any for sale in my area. I have tried CL, classified ads, etc...

    David
     
  4. MichaelMouse

    MichaelMouse

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    Don't let this bother you. It's not a problem if you turn the outside of a bowl toward the headstock. You can put the whole banjo in where you've made space. Not sure why Al considers it a problem.

    First I'd heard of a discontinuation on the Delta. Maybe just Home Depot is dropping the line. It's FWW editors' choice, and seems to have good bottom end rpm for its size and more than enough HP.

    On/Off switches can be wired into the motor or to a remote where the whole thing plugs in. Also not a problem if you want one you can put wherever you want.
     
  5. David Tackett

    David Tackett

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    Some guys on another site, told me Delta was purchased by another company and that there was some discussion on revising their tool offerings. Their concern with this acquisition was availability of repair parts. They recommended the Jet because of this, but I think I like the Delta better.

    Would you go with the stand on either of these models or would you just bolt it to a good heavy work bench?
     
  6. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    That is really old news. Delta was spun off from B&D over a year ago. They had a parts supply problem for the last several months, but now have a new system set up and things seem to be back in order.

    Their 46-460 is one of their best selling tools so the HD person was either talking about them dropping it from their inventory or else didn't know what he was talking about. I have used other turner's 46-460 in several all-day classes and found it to be a really nice machine. It is very well built and runs very smoothly and quiet. If I didn't already have three lathes, I might get one for myself.
     
  7. MichaelMouse

    MichaelMouse

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    Sounds like a latrine rumor second class, as we used to call them. Might want to question the time frame, as Bill suggests.

    I wouldn't get a stand if I had tools to build one. Building one allows you to make good use of the space underneath that's wasted on a stand. Cabinet out of heavy sheetgoods with a double top is what I'm using for my 3000. Just mount the lathe all the way up front, so you won't have to lean, and extend the legs about 4-6" at an angle to counter over-the-top thrust. Think of trapezoid ends, with the rear at 90 degrees, the front at perhaps 10 off. All the mass required to hold the lathe stable is supplied by the cabinet. Put your heavy stored items on the bottom to keep the CG low.

    Elevate your lathe ends above the table on 3/4 or a pair of 3/4 blocks so you can clean out underneath and give that motor some clearance.

    http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d160/GoodOnesGone/P3140057.jpg My baby in its pre-door days. Doing again, I wouldn't set it back from the front of the top, just extend the top past the drawers a bit so a casually closed one wouldn't collect shavings.
     
  8. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    The reason:
    I like to balance the grain on my bowls.
    When the bowl is shifted I like to true rim.
    I occasionally turn a thin bowl
    When I do this I true the outside of the bowl after it is in the chuck and then hollow it.
    I also turn a lot of hollow forms hollowed through the face grain.
    On these I turn from both side toward the high spot somewhere in the middle and shift them to balance the grain.

    So all these forms under 10" diameter no problem.
    At about 10 1/2. I would have to take the pieces off the lathe to turn on the other side or buy a second banjo.

    If you are willing to accept the grain pattern you cut with the saw then the clearance over the banjo is not an issue for bowls with walls over a 1/2 thick as the difference from out of round is not noticeable. Make the wall an 1/8" thick and you are out of round a 1/16 at the rim big difference.


    Al
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2013
  9. MichaelMouse

    MichaelMouse

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    Have a steady? The key to even-thickness rims is to use it as a matter of course. Especially with thin stuff.

    Not sure what balancing of the grain means beyond centering the annuals on the bottom, which is done before mounting on the pin chuck. Make the center of the oval the center of the bottom. Seldom a surprise thereafter.

    When I had to turn around the headstock to do something like your hollow form bottom, which I hate to do, I found unscrewing the chuck and putting the banjo behind took care of my needs. Gotta love the long banjo and rest on the 3000. Beyond that, there's the extension I bought because the old 46-204 wouldn't let me get outside and true a 6" diameter workpiece. Dumb design on that one.

    Call 'em "workarounds" if you want, but they make the height over even a short banjo with a short rest into a non-problem.
     
  10. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    I have a very nice steady made by John Nichols that I use on some hollow forms.

    Never found it worth the effort to deploy on bowls.
    True the outside turn the walls to thickness 1-2" at a time
    Of course these are small bowls 14" and under.

    I would recommend truing the outside before using a steady.

    Al
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2013
  11. John Nesmith

    John Nesmith

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    As the Mouse recommends, build a stand. Something like he showed, or something like this:

    [​IMG]
     
  12. Dean Center

    Dean Center

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    For most of us, deciding what lathe to buy involves finding the sweet spot among the trade offs. If the question is what new, full sized lathe can I get for under $1000, one to consider is the Nova 1624. It's a 16" lathe and refurbished from Teknatools or on sale at Woodcraft will be under $1000. The biggest trade off is lack of variable speed--you have to move belts to change speed. (I have no financial interest in Nova/teknatools and think the two other lathes are fines choices, in smaller sizes, too)
     
  13. David Tackett

    David Tackett

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    It does not have to be a new lathe, but I am having a hard time finding used ones in my region. I will check out the lathes you listed though. Thanks.
     
  14. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    David,
    Used lathes tend to sell quickly. So you need luck and patience.
    Sometimes local chapters forward lathe for sale emails.

    Starting with a 12" machine is a route taken by lots of turners.

    You also need a sharpening system,
    Bowl gouge, spindle gouge, parting tool, and maybe a skew
    Face shield, dust mask,
    A couple of classes.

    Have fun,
    Al
     
  15. Ian Thorn

    Ian Thorn

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    Just to add to what Al said about the extras you may find they add up to more than the lathe if you are not careful but his suggested are a min and don't forget the safety gear. Have fun and enjoy turning on your new lathe.

    Ian
     
  16. David Tackett

    David Tackett

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    I have everything, but the lathe tools. What is a good starter set? I keep reading people say to buy cheaper ones, because you chew them up learning to sharpen them. I have a full shop full of all kinds of tools, I am just adding a lathe.
     
  17. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    David,
    Tools depend on what you want to turn.

    I'm not a big fan of buying sets but sometimes it is the simplest way to go.

    If you are able to take a class of hook up with a mentor, get the tools you have learned to use and keep using them until oh are really good with them.

    When I teach a beginning bowl class, I want the students to have a bowl gouge(5/8 dia bar), spindle gouge 3/8 dia, and a round nosed scraper 1" or 3/4"
    8 or 10" calipers and a four jaw chuck.
    Those are all the tools needed for a bowl and once you get good with the bowl gouge the round nosed scraper is not used.
    Take a bowl class from someone else they might require a parting tool and might not require the spindle gouge.

    If you want to do pens and bottle stoppers
    You need spindle gouge or a skew or both.

    If you want to do lidded boxes and other spindles a parting tool

    I suggest checkout Packard woodturning tools and craft supplies.
    The HSS Packard label these are good quality tools at reasonable prices
    The Artisan tools from Craft supplies are similar in cost and value. Packard is closer to you faster delivery

    1/2 Bowl gouge Around $65
    3/8 Spindle gouge around $35
    3/4 Scraper Around $55

    Hope this helps a bit. Big thing is finding a mentor or a formal class.
    Al
     
  18. David Tackett

    David Tackett

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    Thanks for the info. I am hoping to get into a class soon. There is one next week at the local Woodcraft. The class is 75 dollars and is for beginners. They provide instruction, wood and tools. I live 60 miles from it, so it is not so local. However, I did find a chapter that meets there and they have a few members who live near me. I signed up for their website, but have not heard anything. They are the Bluegrass Area Wood Turners.
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2013
  19. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I bought a Sorby starter set a number of years ago. They are good, but get almost no use after the first few months mostly because they are all small.

    Regarding what you have read from others about "chewing them up from sharpening", I disagree and think that statements like that are extreme exaggeration unless somebody treats them like lawnmower blades and pays no attention to good advice found in books, videos, and elsewhere. After about nine years, the tools in my beginners set are probably within an eighth of an inch of the original lengths (and for certain within a quarter inch). Besides, think of turning tools as you would think of sandpaper as being expendables.
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2013
  20. David Tackett

    David Tackett

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    Nova 1" x 8 TPI Precision Midi Chuck Promotional Package

    Is this the chuck I need starting out?

    Ideal for mini, midi, and smaller lathes or for smaller turnings on a large lathe. The Nova Precision Midi Chuck is packed with features and uses the same accessories as the Nova, SuperNova, SuperNova2 and the Nova Titan Chucks (without the need to use an adaptor plate as required with older Compac Chucks). Fast action, only one turn to tighten makes it ideal for production turning of smaller pieces. Comes standard with 50mm jaws (automatic jaw safety stop) and includes a Woodworm screw. Ideal for bowl work up to 12" in diameter and 3" to 4" deep. Body is 3-7/16" in diameter, 2-3/8" deep and weighs 2.9 lb.


    Comes standard with 50mm jaws
    Ideal for bowl work up to 12" in diameter and 3" to 4" deep
    Body is 3-7/16" in diameter, 2-3/8" deep and weighs 2.9 lb.
     

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