hole in tool handle

Discussion in 'Woodturning Health & Safety' started by Rod Smith, Nov 26, 2013.

  1. Rod Smith

    Rod Smith

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2009
    Messages:
    10
    I have a half inch square carbide tool that I am making a handle for. I know I can rout or cut on a table saw two halves of the handle and then glue them together and turn. I would like to use a whole piece but I don't have a 5/8ths bit that will go the 7 inches deep that I need. I was planning on using a forstner bit and I have an extension but it's diameter is more than 5/8 th of an inch. What are my options to get the job done?
     
  2. JeffB

    JeffB

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2008
    Messages:
    8
    Handle Hole

    Why do you need a hole 7" deep? Most any tool handle I've ever made, some for square carbide tool shafts, has only needed a hole 2-2.5" deep. Installing a metal ferrule on the end of the tool handle around the hole (with at least 1/4-3/8" of wood around the hole) will help keep it from splitting for most uses. A short length of copper pipe works fine as a ferrule.

    I'd also round off the square shaft (on a grinder) where it is going into the handle (and then you only need a 1/2" hole for 1/2" square stock), size the hole diameter so the shaft slides in smoothly with a little pressure, but not loose, then use epoxy when gluing the shaft into the handle. Filing a groove or two in the round portion of the shaft going into the handle will help keep it from turning in the hole after the epoxy sets, but not really necessary.

    I think rounding the shaft where it goes into the handle will provide a stronger tool overall as more of the tool shaft will be directly supported by the wood around it instead of just being held by the epoxy. Has always worked for me and haven't split a handle yet even with some pretty nasty catches. Good Luck and have fun!
     
  3. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2004
    Messages:
    4,311
    Location:
    Lakeland, Florida
    Home Page:
    Rod,

    Ditto on rounding the shaft,.
    My gouges which have round shafts, I fit into holes 2 -2 1/2 deep. If I have a tight fit I just seat the tool by tapping the handle. If the tool twists I use a drop or two of thick CA to hold it in place. The CA will break when I want to put a new tool in the handle. I have made handles for tangled tools. These I drill a hole to fit the tang about an inch from the tool. With a ferrule in place I seat these tools by tapping the handle against the floor. The tool will wedge into the hole 1/2 to 3/4 inch. I will use a few drops of thick CA if the handle ever gets loose. Al
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2013
  4. Rod Smith

    Rod Smith

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2009
    Messages:
    10
    The shaft I have is 16 inches long. I wanted at least 9 inches sticking out. If I only put 2 1/2 to 3 inches in the handle will that be strong enough? I like the idea of rounding the handle.
     
  5. Dale Miner

    Dale Miner

    Joined:
    May 13, 2007
    Messages:
    201
    Alternative to rounding the shaft

    amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Dindustrial&field-keywords=square+hole+sleeve

    In addition to eliminating the need to round the shaft, the sidewall of the sleeve is thick enough to allow for drilling and tapping for a pair of smaller set screws. Driiling and tapping would permit sliding the tool in or out to suit the task at hand.

    The wood would need to be somewhat larger at the business end and need a larger ferrule.
     
  6. JeffB

    JeffB

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2008
    Messages:
    8
    Hole Depth

    The main stress on the tool is at the cutting end and where it sits on the tool rest. I have many tools with shafts 9" long or more that are only seated 2-1/2" into the handle. Use a good strong hardwood like cherry or oak or maple and avoid using softer woods like pine, spruce or fir and you'll be fine. The ferrule is important though and leave enough wood for some thickness between the tool shaft and the ferrule.
     
  7. john lucas

    john lucas

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2004
    Messages:
    5,830
    Location:
    Cookeville TN USA
    Drill a hole equal to the square side dimensions. This will be too small for the corners of the square shaft to go into. The heat the very tip of the rear of the tool that will be inserted. Heat just the tip close to red hot. Let it cool just until the red is gone and then drive it in the handle. It will burn the sides as it goes in creating a perfect fit. You don't even need to glue it.
    If the tool is carbon steel instead of HSS put a pair of vice grips on the shank slightly above the maximum depth it will go into the wood. This will act as a heat sink and prevent the heat from traveling up the tool, although I've never had a problem with heat that would damage the temper traveling that far.
     
  8. john lucas

    john lucas

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2004
    Messages:
    5,830
    Location:
    Cookeville TN USA
    I just re read your message. Do you have any other bits that go that deep but aren't quite as large. They will work but you may have to leave the tip more red hot so it will burn the hole better. Run cold water on the blade after inserting it and it will cool the steel to keep from burning the wood further than needed after you insert the tool.
     

Share This Page