How did you get started in wood turning?

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by PapaDoc, Apr 27, 2004.

  1. PapaDoc

    PapaDoc

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    One of the first threads of the old forum was this question: How did you get started in woodturning?
    It was a very popular thread, yielding some good narratives about life changes and transitions. I am doing a series in the AAW magazine about this topic and hope to vary between well-known turners as well as average guys like me.
    While I am downloading all the input on the old site, would you care to enter your own story as to how you came to invest this much energy and money into this wonderful endeavor known as wood turning?
    Thanks,
    David Galloway
    GAW
     
  2. Jeff Jilg

    Jeff Jilg

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    Well, I'm not a well known turner, but would classify as an average guy...except for my nerdy tendencies :)

    I had an old Fine Woodworking article from an Israeli turner who did router fluting. That article was always just plain fascinating to me. How did he dream up that fixture? How did he figure out how to set it up and do the 4 or 5 turnings they showed in the article? I always wanted to try and emulate some of the stuff I saw in that article - it really just stuck with me. If there was ever some time, I wanted to do it. I always seemed to be too busy (long hours at big computer companies).

    We also happened to be in Brisbane, Australia around 1995 at the botanical garden there. And they coincidently had a woodturning exhibition at the same location. It was free and we walked thru it for about an hour looking at the instant gallery. I always remembered that show and thought "Wow - those folks created some cool stuff, someday I'd like to try it".

    So I bought a used lathe about 8 years ago. Didn't know anything about it. Good intensions. But the lathe sat unused with some collected wood in the garage until 2.5 years ago. It was a Harbor Freight installed on a stand.

    I turned my first piece out of spalted sycamore. It was a 13" salad bowl with a glossy finish. That went out as a wedding present for the brother in law. Well, everyone who saw it was just wowed and it spurred a lot of discussions at the post wedding reception at their house. One item in my favor was the wood was just gorgeous. But I also spent a lot of time on that bowl. It was a piece that anyone would want. And the net reward was all the kudos. I'm sure drug addictions start the same way.

    I turned about 15 more pieces on that lathe. Most were big, and most of them turned outboard. The lathe was just not up to par. The motor was just about fried from all the catches and stalls. And I had started the other addiction - collecting wood. After a lot of analysis I bought a PM 3520a. Then I started turning more and more. Last year I had a lot of free time and turned over 400 pieces. Most are still roughouts. The garage is now a turning studio.

    Another thing that added to the addiction was that friends and relatives really like to see the studio, the gadgets, and all the turned items. The entire hobby spawns a lot of discussions. My lunch buddies always want to see or hear about the latest turning. Sometimes I take a finished piece when I meet a buddy for lunch. It's a craft that the layman can understand and the expert can talk about. That's not always the case and I think that's why it leads to easy discourse, and it's fun to do.
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2004
  3. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    David,
    I'm a local turner having fun.

    I became fascinated with the wood lathe in high school but I wasn’t allowed to use it because I only took 1st year shop and you had to be in 2nd year to use it. In 1975 I bought a cheap delta 12†and a cheap set of tools and started turning. I got Dale Nish’s book and used that as my teacher.
    In 1987 hung up my softball glove, decided that I had built my last furniture, and started turning as much as I could. I gave turnings to friends and as hostess gifts. Then the people would call me and ask me if they could pay me to make a piece like I gave so and so. Several offices where I worked began giving my bowls as wedding gifts.

    The biggest change for me began around 1990 when my wife bought me an AAW membership using a form Craft Supplies included with an order. Because of that Frank Amigo called me up and invited me to a meeting of new woodturning group, the Chesapeake Woodturners. I did my first show in a booth I shared with Frank and two other turners. I took classes that Frank arranged for club members with Liam O’neil, David Ellsworth, Michael Peterson, Christian Burchard, and Johannes Michelsen at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts. Then Frank asked me to teach woodturning at Maryland Hall for the creative arts. Now I run the woodturning program at Maryland Hall with Joe Dickey and I arrange classes for club members with Lyle Jamieson, Trent Bosch, Al Stirt, and Cindy Drozda.
    Sherry, my wife, started turning around 1996 and we’re having ball.
     
  4. Whit

    Whit

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    David, I too am not a famous turner, just a guy having a lot of fun.

    Up until about 5 or 6 years ago I was "flat" woodworker and made some fairly nice stuff. Then on a whim I bought an old Rockwell (Delta) 12 inch lathe on an eBay auction. I hadn't a clue what to do with it but I bought Richard Raffins basic book. I tried turning a few things without any noticable success and a fair amount of fear and uncertainty. Very soon the lathe got shoved off in the corner of the shop and I went back to flat work.

    Then 2 summers ago my wife noticed an introductory woodturning class offered through our local community college and announced she was going to take it. Would like to, also? Yeah, I guess so, said I.

    The class was a 2 day class of 3 people (we each had our own lathe to work on) in Lyle Jamieson's studio. We didn't know, of course, that Lyle IS one of those famous turners.

    The class was a revelation. We learned how to turn a decent bowl easily and safely. Success without fear. What a concept.

    After Lyle's class we came home and pulled the lathe out of the corner and started turning things. We almost immediately discovered that part of the fear had been caused by the lathe - not very heavy or stable (even after I added about 300 pounds of sand to the stand) and its slowest speed was 990 RPM. Trying to rough out even a modest sized bowl was, to say the least, exciting. No, downright scary.

    The weekend after the class I attended my first meeting of the local AAW chapter, Northwest Michigan Woodturners here in Traverse City, MI. Lyle is the chapter president. I met a bunch of really great people there who offered help and encouragement and joined us up on the spot. That was in October of 2002.

    We kept trying to work with the old Rockwell with moderate success, all considered. At the next meeting one of the guys had a catalog page showing the Nova DVR 3000. It looked really good to me but no-one there had ever seen, let alone used one. That meeting was in one of our members shop and he had a straight Nova 3000 which was used for a demo. I got a chance to try it briefly. To shorten the story, when I got home and got on the Internet, found Technatool's website, read everything I could about the DVR, and found that Woodcraft, their dealer for it had a shop in Canton, MI, near Detroit. I gave them a call. They had two in stock and would be open the next day (Sunday). Bright and early the next day I drove the 250 miles to Canton and brought it home. A couple days later I finished building a heavy 2 x 10 and plywood stand with 350 pounds of sand. That's the last flat work I've done.

    What an incredible difference. Control! I was off and running, turning nearly every day. The fireplace woodpile was decimated and we started finding other wood to rescue. My wife was so intimidated by the Rockwell that she stopped turning. By the time she tried the DVR she had lost all confidence and stopped turning.

    I had given away a bunch of bowls and such for wedding, birthday, etc. presents and, like Jeff, got a whole lot praise. Last summer my sister saw a notice of an Arts and Crafts Fair being held in a small town near here. A juried show of about 35 or so booths. After some prodding I applied and was accepted. For me it was a huge success. I sold just under $900 worth. I took 41 pieces to sell and came home with 9. A number of people, including the fair directors told me I was badly underpriced but how would one know? I have pretty much figured out why the 9 didn't sell as well.

    This summer I'm juried into 3 fairs and waiting to hear about 2 others.

    Oh, by the way, my wife retook Lyle's class last January and is turning some really nice things. She'll have some of her work in the the fairs, as well.

    I've gone on far too long, I know, but this is all still so new and exciting for me. And to think I can get paid for having a ball. Wow!

    Whit
     
  5. arbud

    arbud

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    An accident

    I'm a "neophyte" (2.5yrs) wood turner; I began turning in Nov. of 2001.

    How did that happen? I was "retired" on 14 Sept., 2001. I had nothing to do but sit around the house and look for another job. To kill time my wife and I went to one of those traveling tool shows in late Oct. There was a wood lathe with a set of carbon steel tools for $59.99. I bought it, set it up in the shop, and started turning wood.

    I had no experience, no training, I'd never turned a piece of wood before and
    had no idea of how to attack a spinning piece of wood. I had at it and something relatively nice showed up--I was addicted! I spent many hours a day in the shop making things. My wife thinks that wood turning kept me as close to sane as possible.

    Problem: We had no money other than Soc. Sec., so how am I going to support my "habit?" I put a few pieces to auction at a wood worker's auction site. The pieces actually sold--habit money!

    I now turn whatsoever a cheap lathe will let me turn. I have to be a bit inventive at times... I'd love to have a 3520 or a DVR, perhaps if I win the lotto...

    There you have it, David, accidental therapy for the unemployed.
     
  6. Bill Hunt

    Bill Hunt

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    Got tired of doing flat work

    I'm new at this, less than a year, but it's great! My wife and I worked the craft shows in Tx, LA, MS, etc for too long. I built , she painted, We sold. Then we started building furniture which was painted. then added Faux Finishing and Murals. After I retired in early 2000, at the insistence of the company I had spent almost 30 years with, We moved back to the farm in MS. Really started building larger and larger pieces, Armories, Entertainment Centers, Chests of drawers, etc.
    Finally got tired of trying to make other people happy, Oh, I want one exactly like that, EXCEPT....... I want it a littlelarger/smaller/wider/taller/shorter/differentcolor... What do you mean the price won't be the same?

    Closed both the retail and the woodworking shop, sold a bunch of machines, moved back to the farm again and bought a Jet Mini and decided to turn bowls for my enjoyment. The surprising thing is that everybody likes them. Have not sold any yet but I am giving them to people who appreciate them.

    Picking up my 3520 this Friday and if I decide I want to I may begin to try to sell some bowls.

    Bottom line is that burn out led to a different direction that is really working for me.

    My wife is going to try her hand at turning pens on the Jet Mini.

    Bill Hunt , (The only turner in Wayne County MS.)
     
  7. Chris Wright

    Chris Wright

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    A tale of 3 lathes (in 2 years)

    I started turning in January of 2002. Well, if you could call it turning. It started in November of 2001 when my mom asked what I wanted for Christmas. I was looking for a new hobby/art form and had just decided that woodcarving took way too long. I started to think back on the other things I had tried or seen and remembered my dad making spindles fly off of his Shopsmith Mark 5 when I was 10 or 12. He never really made anything, I think he just wanted to be able to say he had tried every configuration of the machine.

    So, I told my mom that I had seen a lathe at HF on sale for $79 and a set of 8 tools for it for $10. What a bargain we thought, and cheap enough that if it didn't stick, it wasn't much of a loss. I picked up a basic turning book, read it from cover to cover and turned a VERY basic, crude looking goblet with a stem about 1/2" in diameter. I was hooked. I spent another $50 and bought the Delta mini tool set and started turning bowls up to 5" in diameter with the 1/4" spindle gouge. If only I had known then...

    Later in January, I contacted the local club (AVWA) and got an invite to the meeting. By April I had worked out a deal to obtain a Garrett Wade 16" shortbed lathe. Also in April, I got the chance to attend a Stuart Batty demonstration and also to spend the day in the club president's shop, learning one-on-one. Those were great things as I progressed quickly after that and in June of 2003, I demonstrated for General Lathes at the AWFS Fair in Anaheim, CA. I started selling and parlayed my earnings into a PM 3520 just 1 1/2 months ago. Also in this last month, I was accepted into my first 2 galleries, one of which has already sold a piece.
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2004
  8. Karl Ziegler

    Karl Ziegler

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    How I got started

    When I was a kid, my dad had an old Craftsmans metal lathe. Since I had just gotten to use a wood lathe in shop class, I set it up, and started using it.

    After nearly a 30 year hiatus I purchase a Jet Mini this past Fall. I still had the old carbin tipped Craftsman tools my dad bought me when I was twelve, but I also picked up a set of high speed tools also.

    One day I might get a bigger lathe like a Jet 1442, but right now I am content making small boxes and bowls, candle sticks and Salt and Pepper mills. I have even sold some of them.

    I am getting a Jet band saw soon. I am havng a blast, and it really is theraputic. :)
     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2004
  9. Joe Herrmann

    Joe Herrmann

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    How I got started in woodturning

    I turned my first bowl in high school shop class; it was made from oak and looked like a dog dish. I still have that thick-bottomed bowl someplace and run across it now and again--it reminds me of how I started.

    Shop was an important part of my high school life and it was only natural that I went off to college, became a woodshop teacher and taught woodworking and turning to the kids as best I could. About that time, Fine Woodworking magazine made its appearance and I (along with many of my students) made several of the segmented bowls that graced the front cover of that premiere issue. All the bowls were scraped and it took about 8 hours to sand the bowls (by hand with folded up pieces of abrasive paper) to what I thought was an acceptable level. I knew that a flawless finish made up for a multitude of sins.

    I muddled along for several years and eventually took a 5-day course with Dale Nish at Craft Supplies in Utah. There I learned that if you shear cut with a bowl gouge instead of attacking the wood with a scraper, it didn’t take 8 hours to sand the bowls! It was the best course I had ever taken, including those in undergrad and graduate school. It was a “life changing†experience.

    A couple of years later, I attended the Provo Symposium and saw what “real turners†were creating and from then on was hooked. I did a demo for my turning club, the NorthCoast Woodturners (AAW’s alpha chapter) on making natural edged bowls. It was one of the techniques covered in Dale’s class. Being the first demo I had ever done for adults, I over-prepared and passed out a 12-page handout.

    Someone suggested that I submit it to a magazine. I sent it in to Fine Woodworking; they accepted and published it. That was the 2nd “life changing†experience in my professional woodworking career. I loved writing about woodworking--it was like writing term papers for money!

    I started to create so many bowls and other turnings that I needed an outlet to get rid of some of them--you can only give away so many to friends and family--so I started doing craft shows. I eventually started doing major shows on the East Coast and in Ohio and Michigan.

    It was at a show in New Jersey that I met the then editor of Creative Woodworks & Crafts magazine and, at the editor’s urging, submitted an article. I soon became a contributing editor for them doing simple turning and woodworking articles. I did close to 70 articles for them over the next several years and eventually was selected to become the editor of their new turning magazine, Woodturning Design.

    I don’t turn as much as I did, but enjoy the new experience.

    Joe Herrmann
     
  10. PapaDoc

    PapaDoc

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    These are great! There a bunch on the old site if you care to look before they are erased. Hope many of you will take the time to put down the circuitous route by which you became addicted.
    David Galloway
     
  11. jprice

    jprice

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    Like most of us, I'm just an "average guy" who got sucked into turning...hook line and sinker.

    About four or five years ago, my neighbor ,Butch, from across the street told me that he was going to attend a weekend bowl turning class with Jerry Kermode up in Northern California. I made the mistake of responding that I had always wanted to learn how to do that. (I wasn't too bad as a rough framer, but could never be called a carpenter.) Butch gave me the name and phone number and said that their might be space left. Bad mistake....

    To make a short story longer...Nancy got a nice weekend at a nice B&B and I got hooked on mighty fine wood shavings up my nose....A month later and I owned a little Delta Midi with some real cheap gouges off of E-Bay. What started out as a crude little Walnut bowl that cost us about $1,000 for the bowl and the weekend, has expanded to over more than I ever immagined. (New gouges, new chucks, face plates, strange woods, chain saw, grinder, grinding jigs, new and bogger lathe, pick up truck to haul everything in...it just seems to go on and on without end <g>)

    I may gripe about the cost and all....but the pure satisfaction of watching the bark disappear and then the wood shavings fly off of a piece to reveal such wonderful beauty is worth every penny.
     
  12. Wally Dickerman

    Wally Dickerman

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    My life in woodturning started in 1936, when I decided to turn a bowl in high school shop. My teacher didn't know any more about bowl turning than I did, but with a lot of trial and error, and the use of most of the available tools, I got it turned. With the proceeds from a summer job that year, I bought a small sears lathe and a few tools. I had become fascinated with woodturning, and nearly 70 years later, that fascination is still there.

    In what I call the "dark ages" of woodturning, there were very few turners, no clubs, no videos, very few books, certainly no turning websites, no bowl gouges or scroll chucks, and tools and lathes were all designed for spindle turning. I wanted to turn bowls, so I had to make many of my own tools. I never met another turner until 1982, when I attended a demo by Dale Nish at a local woodworkers store. There I met a number of other turners, and my turning life changed completely. Since that time I've helped in forming three turning clubs, I've taught almost 300 turners in classes, I've done demos at AAW, Provo, and at many clubs, I've sold many hundreds of my pieces and I've become sort of a senior citizen of turning. I'm now turning on my eighth lathe, an 800 pound Nichols. What a wonderful, fascinating, lifetime hobby woodturning has been!
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2004
  13. Texascop47

    Texascop47

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    IN December of 2003 I was flipping thru the channels on TV and caught a program on woodturning and they were turning a rolling pin. I looked and they had several different shows coming up in the next couple days. I watched or taped the shows for viewing later. I told my wife and friends I found something I was going to do. I looked up on the internet for wood lathe and anything to do with it. I found out that Woodcraft in the Dallas area had one. I had never seen a wood lathe before. I had about 20 years ago worked on a metal lathe and had though then how nice it would be to hold the tools and be able to cut. I went to Woodcraft to look at the lathes and ask some questions. I was looking at the jet or delta 12 to 14 inch size. While there they asked where I lived which is about 60 miles away and they told me that there was a woodturner near me. They gave me his name and address. By this time the 16 inch jet was looking good. I also signed up for a beginning turners class but it would be February before I could take it. I called the number and a friendly person answered and invited me over to his shop. Well he set up a block of pine in the lathe and showed me how to make it round and then start making beads and valleys. He just let me cut this wonderful thing down. He had a powermatic 3520 boy was this a nice lathe. I asked how much a lathe like that cost and where to get one. I was hooked big time. I called the number and the next thing I knew I had a nice 3520 and bandsaw sitting in my garage. I went to woodcraft and said I need tools and they complied. I grabbed a piece of firewood and started turning. I then started reading and asking more questions on every forum I could. Well I am having fun and the wife has bowls, goublets, scoups, and I am now starting to turn some hollow vessels. I have a lot more tools and each one is a learning curve. I keep trying different things I see on the forums and books and this has helped me greatly. Also everyone I have asked has bent over backwards to help this newbee along the path. I still consider myself a beginner but when people at work and down here where I live ask to buy what I have and just name a price. I have giving most of them something maybe only a desk pencil holder or candy bowl. I guess I will have to start selling some of the bowls and vessels now or build a bigger place. I have about 23 rough bowls ready and dry to finish and 17 hollow forms ready to complete. I try to turn from 2 to 3 a week. As you can see I am ADDICTED big time but loving every minute of it.
     
  14. George Balock

    George Balock

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    I got started...

    When I saw Palmer Sharpless demonstrating at a local woodworking show. Plamer was having so much fun I decided that I wanted to give it a try. Eight years later, I'm still at it. I've gotten more involved with the turning community and I'm still learning and loving it.
    George
     
  15. woodwish

    woodwish

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    Midlife Crisis

    I have worked around wood as a hobby or job most of my life. I have been a high school teacher for 27 years, and many of those years were as a wood shop teacher. I did a lot of flat work in that great shop after hours for myself but never messed with the huge ancient lathe much. I did take a few scraps of old 4x4 posts and made them round. Never did enjoy it much and the tools I had at that time were pretty rough. I had no knowledge or time to learn how to sharpen them. Students were never allowed to use it because I really didn't know how to teach them to do anything.

    About 10 years ago we phased out all of our wood shop classes in this area so all those great tools disappeared from our school. I started teaching video productions, which I absolutely love, plus I stay much cleaner and cooler at school. I missed being able to make things so I slowly starting gathering tools and working in my garage, but never considered a lathe.

    About a year ago my wife insisted on parking her car in her garage/my shop. We decided that the smart thing to do was build a shop in the back yard. For some reason my wife and daughters bought me a Delta Mini-lathe and some tools for my birthday last June. I was hooked rapidly making anything I could turn, and spending late night hours online doing research or spending money on accessories. I also started the shop, 16' x 32', which I finally moved into just a few months ago. I am still building benches and cabinets for the shop, but I wander off to turn some wood as often as I can.

    I've joined the closest AAW chapter (50+ miles away), attended some seminars, read some books, and watched some videos. As my skills have gotten better I realize that soon I will be looking for a new bigger lathe. My big objective for attending the AAW Symposium this summer will be to look for my next lathe.

    After a long day at school, expecially on rough days, nothing relaxes me like getting away from everything else and making some wood shavings. Some men have a midlife crisis when they turn 50 and buy expensive sports cars, I just go out back and turn wood.

    Ray
     
  16. JRutten

    JRutten

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    All thumbs

    I grew up with five brothers and everyone of them could take an engine apart, put it into another car and make it work. I'ld break something just changing the oil. So you can imagine how worried I was when after asking for bids to refinish our basement with tongue and groove wall boards and having EVERY one of the contractors bid it for paneling my wife suggested we do it ourselves. The help given to us by my wife's father was invaluable. He would tell us what to do between weekend visits. I would sometimes shake my head in wonder like when he told us to put the baseboard an inch above the floor. I couldn't figure out why were doing that until the carpet layers came and asked us if we had had it professional installed because usually people forget to leave the space under the baseboard for the carpet. Our basement remodel was a complete success. After that my wife, the in-laws, and I started going to the wood show every year. On a whim I picked up on of those things that converted a drill into a lathe. I don't know what it was but the first time I put tool to wood I knew this would become my hobby. I don't spend as much time on it as I would like (my job usually averages 60-70 hours a week) but I do what I can when I can.
     
  17. Dominic Greco

    Dominic Greco

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    An enthusiastic amateur

    I had been working "in the flat" since High School. My Dad had always loved wood working and always wanted a shop of his own. I guess this rubbed off on me. In 1998 I had just set my first "real" shop up in the basement of my old house and had several furniture projects under my belt.

    But my turning addiction started with a visit from my friend Dave Smith in the Summer of 2000. He and I had been conversing via the internet (on Badger Pond) for some time. And when it came to pass that he was visiting family in the area, he decided to stop by. He gave me and my wife a very pretty big leaf maple bowl. I was hooked. :cool2:

    I officially started woodturning when my wife bought me a Jet Jwl-1236 for Christmas in 2000. I later took a class with my friend Bill Grumbine and received instruction from the late (and much missed) Phil Wall.

    About 2 years ago, I got to the point where I felt the bowls I made were good enough to sell. With some of the proceeds from this, I was able to upgrade to a Jet JWL-1642EVS and I couldn't be happier (unless someone gave me a Stubby lathe!).
     
  18. Mark Mandell

    Mark Mandell

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    After having made most of the furniture in the house, I get a Raffan book for X-mas from one of my kids with the note, "Only thing I could find that you haven't done, yet." Month later I go to a wood show and, on PURE impulse, snag the show's floor-model JET 1236 for $500. :cool:

    A day's lesson with Bill Grumbine in PA, and a couple $hundred to Jacques Coulomb for some good tools . . .

    Done :D

    [The table saw weeps so softly you can barely hear it and only when all else is dead quiet . . . ;) ]
     
  19. Chuck Ludwigsen

    Chuck Ludwigsen

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    Life takes a Turn

    Some hobbies you start at the wrong time in life and some you start at the right time. Sometimes, the turns that life takes make all the difference.

    I first got started turning in 1996 when I went to Branson, MO to visit my in-laws. My wife and I went to her cousin's one day and her fiance was in his shop turning. He had a small Delta lathe set up. He was just finishing a platter. I loved it.

    Well he wasted no time. He chucked a piece between centers and said "here, you try it.". He guided me through the process and, at the end of the day, I had a set of candle holders (one walnut and one cherry). I bought my first lathe a few months later, a 1983 Buffalo lathe with solid spindle. I took a class from Dick Absher, a local turner and middle school art teacher here in Memphis. I joined the newly formed Midsouth Woodturners Guild at the first meeting. I would stay out in the shop turning until 2 to 3 in the morning. My wife felt like she had lost me, but I was hooked.

    Or so I thought.

    About a year and a half later an illness caused me to step away from my lathe and my shop for a bit. By the time I was fully recovered, I was also trying to start a new job and dedicating alot of time out of town. Mostly in NYC. September 11, 2001 brought me home in more ways than one. After a struggle to get another job, and a long path to financial recovery, I went out to my shop to just clean it out and relieve a little stress on the lathe.

    About that same time, I discovered the Midsouth Woodturners Guild had moved to a location closer to me and also stumbled onto WoodCentral. Between those three events, the candle was re-lit.

    But this time, I have grown up more, value my time with my wife and family more, desire to "do it right" more. So I have managed to turn more pieces while maintaining a better balance with my time.

    My wife no longer feels like a wood widow. She is part of what I do and encourages me every day.

    Through the internet, I have also met the likes of Russ Fairfield, Wally Dickerman, John Lucas, Terry Daniels, Pam Rielly, Herman De Vries, and so many others that guide us gently and encouragingly through this craft.

    My hope is to someday retire from Information Technology and open a workshop where I can teach woodworking and woodturning. A place where people, who do not have the means or space to put a nice shop together, can still enjoy woodcrafting by using My Workshop.

    Happy turning...
    Chuck in Memphis, TN.
     
  20. PapaDoc

    PapaDoc

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2004
    Messages:
    124
    Location:
    Atlanta, Georgia
    This thread continues to fascinate me with the variety of starting points but a common passion. As I am continue to formulate this article, your response are very encouraging.
    Thanks to each one who has responded.
    David Galloway
     

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