How do you keep your beds clean?

Discussion in 'Tutorials and Tips' started by Mark Warden, Dec 3, 2009.

  1. Mark Warden

    Mark Warden

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    I recently bought a new lathe and I waxed the bed but when I turned a couple Walnut bowls the bed turned black.Any tips on cleaning it up I tried wet sanding with WD40 but not happy with the results. Thanks for any and all input.
     
  2. Gary Slater

    Gary Slater

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    your answer

    Boeshield Rust Free and Boeshield T9 Rust and Corrosion Protection. I use it on my lathes and table saw. I think others have posted here about it before, that is how I found it. Works well.
     
  3. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    I never worried about it when I had my PM (8 years). I always turned green wood, and there was water everywhere. Even if I had buffed it out with steel wool, I would have worn through. Just buff lightly, and just make sure you don't get rusting. Blackening isn't a problem.

    robo hippy
     
  4. Steve Russell

    Steve Russell

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    I use Lathe Drapes...

    Hello Mark,

    I use a set of lathe drapes to keep my bedways clean and rust free. Here is a link to an article I wrote that gives you more detail:

    http://www.woodturningvideosplus.com/lathe-drapes.html

    Take care and best wishes to you and yours!
     
  5. Robert Manning

    Robert Manning member

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    David Ellsworth piles wet shavings on the bedways to develop a layer of rust so the tailstock doesn't slip 'n' slide when it is tightened.
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2009
  6. MichaelMouse

    MichaelMouse

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    I'm betting that those who finish on the lathe make a bigger mess than simple corrosion, which doesn't hurt anything, and with a quick wipe with oil or wax, slides fine. Cosmetics, really. Don't think I'd put cloths anywhere near where they might be snagged by a spinning work. Get impatient on cure time with CA, and you'll have to slide a scraper to get the nubs off the metal.

    My tablesaw is in line with the throw zone, so I use a tablecloth there, or cardboards, as I use behind the lathe when I think of it. I'd cardboard under, if you think it's a problem. I use dark under light woods and light under dark woods to highlight when cutting or sanding pieces with interrupted edges, and with a magnet, they stay put.
     
  7. john lucas

    john lucas

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    I spray wd-40 on mine before turning any wet wood. Then I wipe it down after I finish. After 6 years and a lot of turning my bed still looks good.
     
  8. Mark Warden

    Mark Warden

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    I'm still trying to get comfortable working with wet wood (flat work syndrome I guess) I've seen too many older machines with pitting on the cast surfaces and don't want to have that problem in the future.Now for my ignorant ? won't that blackened area be more prone to rust? My shop is not climate controlled and gets very humid in the summer months.
     
  9. John Jordan

    John Jordan

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    Not since he got good lathes. :) All modern lathes will lock nicely with lubrication, polished, or waxed beds. It was the General lathes that didn't lock

    As for the original question, WD 40 is hard to beat if you're turning green wood. Just use some scotchbrite or fine paper with the WD-40. I'm not aware of anything that will last a day when turning woods with high tannic acid content, such as walnut.

    John
     
  10. John Jordan

    John Jordan

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    I answered on another posts, but: It won't pit if you clean it off after you finish turning. Just rub it with scotchbrite and WD40. The black looks worse than it is-a reaction to the tannic acid in the wood. Other woods have little or no tannic acid and don't look so bad immediately.

    I've turned literally thousands of pieces over the last twenty-five years and have been through gallons of WD40 I expect.:) Ask anyone who knows me the condition of my lathe and equipment. I spray the toolrest and polish it with a little sandpaper, and spray the bed each time before I start turning. I also remove the toolrest base and spray the cam etc. every couple of uses. It makes a BIG difference.

    There is really no equivalent to waxing your saw table-not if you're working green wood.

    In my demos the first thing I do is stress lathe maintenance, starting with this process. It makes you a better turner with no learning curve and minimal cost. :)

    John
     
  11. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I use Johnson's Paste Wax on the cast iron tables of all of my woodworking machinery. It is fairly durable and long lasting and tends to repel dust and dirt as well as water unlike some of the oily or greasy treatments available. The biggest advantage of Johnson's paste wax is than it reduces friction considerably so that the tool rest, tailstock, and headstock (if applicable) slide much more easily than no treatment or some of the other treatments which may increase friction.

    I have been a big fan of Boeshield T-9 ever since I became an aircraft owner in the 1970's. However, I have been less than impressed with using it to coat any cast iron surfaces in my shop.
     
  12. MichaelMouse

    MichaelMouse

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    Oddly, the engineering world will tell you that cast iron pits less, and with less harm to the integrity of the material than steel. Consider those hundred-year-old plus water and trash pipes buried all over the country. They're cast iron for that very reason.

    Condensation happens when the temperature of the material is below the dewpoint. So unless your machine and walls are sweating, you have no worries about lack of climate control.
     
  13. Richard Baker

    Richard Baker RIP

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    After reading the title of this thread I wanted to write "Don't let the dogs sleep in them.", but I manfully resisted that temptation.

    Bill, I still like T-9 on non-working or semi-working surfaces like the drill press column and RAS column. Frequently clean the lathe bed and bottom surfaces of the banjo with WD-40 and paper towels.
     
  14. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Richard, it is great for low speed moving parts like the acme screws on clamps or the jackscrews on my planer cutter head assembly. On my airplane, it was used on bellcranks, pulleys, and control surface hinges.

    It was also a useful substitute when I was out of propwash. :D (it was more fun to send a helper over to the FBO to pick up some propwash, though).
     
  15. Bernie Weishapl

    Bernie Weishapl

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    Whenever I turn walnut I do like John. I asked him about it a couple of years ago. I use scotchbrite and WD40 then wax with Johnson paste wax.
     
  16. odie

    odie

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    I remember that joke! .....it's been a few years!

    We used to send the newbies out for kiniffel pins, too! Ever heard of that one?

    :D

    ooc
     
  17. Clifton C

    Clifton C

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    Odie
    If I remember correctly, Kniffle pins were cleaned in a bucket of steam (prop wash being in short supply). A short piece of water line was tied to on so as not to burn your fingers.
    Now that we are supposed to be “kinder and gentler†even snipe hunting is politically incorrect…
    cc
     
  18. MichaelMouse

    MichaelMouse

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    Is that a PETA thing?

    I can still remember the call from the guffawing guys at base supply wanting to know who had sent our jeep down to pick up a fallopian tube for a Collins R390 receiver.
     
  19. odie

    odie

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    Clifton......

    HA! :D

    Yeah......those are the ones!

    They always seemed to be in short supply......and, those that got burned couldn't wait to play the trick on the next unsuspecting guy! I guess it's a "tag, you're it" sort of thing.......you couldn't get rid of this cootie until you passed it along to someone else! ;)

    Yeah.......The guys didn't waste any time to give me my initiation! :eek:

    .....sort of rites of passage, I guess! :D

    ooc
     
  20. Jim Killen

    Jim Killen

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    I worked on a rifle range, and as each new batch of recruits arrived, we'd pick a dummy and sends him for 25' of firing line, or a bucket of steam, or, best of all, the brass magnet. The rules were, if he came to you, you had to send him to someone of higher rank, trying to get as high as possible up the chain of command. I think the record was a Colonel, who didn't find it amusing..............no sense of humor!
     

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