How do you keep your beds clean?

Discussion in 'Tutorials and Tips' started by Mark Warden, Dec 3, 2009.

  1. john lucas

    john lucas

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    Jim When I left basic training and got to Keesler AFB our barracks chief sent me out for a yard of flight line. I filled his bunk with concrete and ashpalt. He didn't try that again.
     
  2. ssinner

    ssinner

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    Easy solution - get a Robust. The ways are stainless steel. Problem solved.

    SS
     
  3. Thomas Daluisio

    Thomas Daluisio

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    WD-40 has water in the ingredients , i use Starrets M-16 on a rag. car wax works well for a time too
     
  4. Dave Peebles

    Dave Peebles

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    Hi Thomas,

    Not according to the FAQ on the web site. Question number two says this..

    What does WD-40 contain?
    While the ingredients in WD-40 are secret, we can tell you what WD-40 does NOT contain. WD-40 does not contain silicone, kerosene, water, wax, graphite, chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), or any known cancer-causing agents.

    http://www.wd40.com/faqs/#a92

    I have been using it for years on my lathe bed.

    Best wishes,

    Dave
     
  5. odie

    odie

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    I have used many things in the past, including paste wax, and a coating of WD-40, and I haven't seen anything that doesn't work to prevent rust and corrosion.

    I have a can of the PG2000 penetrating lubricant that I used for a couple years......it works, too.....but, expensive stuff.

    click:
    http://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/s...Pro_Gold_Lubricant___pro_gold_lubricant?Args=

    For the past couple years, I've gone back to what I was using a couple decades ago! I have a lidded container with a rag saturated in plain old motor oil. Use it after roughing wet bowl blanks, and every couple of months, or so. If you leave the bedways wet, dust will stick to it. This is the common complaint, but if you use it correctly, it'll prevent rust and will not be a dust magnet. Wipe it on with the wet oil rag right over any existing rust and black corrosion, and take a clean rag or paper towel to rub it off, leaving a very thin coating, almost left dry......very simple, quick, cheap and effective!

    As with many ways I do things, I suspect there will be those who disagree with my methods.......and, this is why I didn't respond earlier. Right now, I'm in one of those moods where I can care less if anyone agrees with me, or not. The oil saturated rag works, just do it right!.......and, that's all I need to know! :D

    ooc
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2009
  6. -e-

    -e-

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    As a production turner who is on the lathe almost every day, for years I've been using WD40 to cleanup, HOWEVER I have to be cautious of using anything that might lubricate the banjo and tailstock. I've experienced slipping after cleaning (which is incredibly dangerous) and have to crank down much harder to secure the components, which is not good for the components.

    Therefore, the lathe is kept "DRY", not pretty -- with the objective to eliminate pitting of the metal without making the surface slippery. In the early years, I used wax but that was a BIG mistake because it accumulated under the banjo/tailstock as a huge hardened cakey mess.

    Simple Green works well too, wiping it dry.

    However, if you're putting your lathe into storage or not using it for months, then using a metal protect-ant with a plastic sheet covering works, just be sure to remove it when you're back in production.
     
  7. Nate Hawkes

    Nate Hawkes

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    Well, I'm not a production turner, but have turned a couple hundred bowls on my PM since the spring; I haven't turned much wet wood for a couple months; (school). I keep a spray bottle of WD-40 next to the lathe. An oil spray bottle is about $5, and a gallon of WD-40 about $15, IIRC. Far cheaper and more enviro friendly than the aerosol cans. My brother in law's father suggested using lathe bed way oil in 50/50 ratio with the wd-40, or a little less than half. He said he had no problems with tailstock slippage, and much better water protection. I haven't tried it, only because I haven't needed anything from the supply catalog lately, but I will on my next order. Thanks to a couple of John Jordan's articles and suggestions, I keep a file, steel wool, and a block of paraffin wax next to the lathe, which has improved my finish cut quality tremendously! I find that daily prep and cleanup are paramount to lathe maintenance, as well as my personal sense of organization in the shop; don't quote me if you visit. :D
     
  8. N7BLW

    N7BLW

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    Topcote works very well to prevent rust from forming on cast iron surfaces.

    That black film is a form of oxide (some antique tool collectors call it 'patina', especially if they're the seller) and will not cause the more familiar red 'rust' to form any more readily than if it weren't present.
     
  9. odie

    odie

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    Nate......

    We use way oil on machinery where I work.

    My understanding of way oil is it's engineered for the specific purpose of maintaining lubrication between sliding surfaces of machinery parts under a state of high compression.

    This probably isn't the best choice for wood lathe, because what we want is for banjos and tailstocks to stay put! :D

    ooc
     
  10. David Somers

    David Somers

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    Morning Odie,

    By way of vindication.....the machinists I know in Hilo, HI all use the same method you are using. Old oil, wiped on very thinly, to maintain their metal surfaces and traveling ways. And they are in a humid, salt air, tropical environment. The only time I had real trouble with this was if I was working with a tannic wood.....and the fix for that obviously was a quick clean and lube right away, as everyone has already mentioned. Volcanic fog was an issue though and seemed to cause corrosion almost overnight. Sulphur Dioxide was the main component. Regular fog didn't cause problems.

    Up at 4,000 feet in Volcano I was able to keep the lathe rust free with Boshield for about 2 weeks an application. Never did try the oil trick. The only time I had real trouble with this was if I was working with a tannic wood.....and the fix for that obviously was a quick clean and lube right away, as everyone has already mentioned. Volcanic fog was an issue though and seemed to cause corrosion almost overnight. Sulphur Dioxide is the main component of Vog. Regular fog didn't cause problems. Now that I am in Seattle rust happens very slowly, even though I am right near the water. Go figure.

    Dave
     
  11. odie

    odie

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    Howdy David.......

    I'm a few blocks away in Montana! Rust never seems to be particular problem anyway, but vigilance is advised......same as you!

    Yes.....plain ol' motor oil on a rag kept in an old peanut jar. Just a quick swipe on the bed rails once in awhile, and every time after roughing wet bowls......followed by a dry rag, or paper towel wipe down. A little blackening or discoloration doesn't bother me a bit! I'm not one to care about keeping everything new looking.....but, I hate rust! :mad:.....and, this method is working like a charm!

    We don't have any volcanoes over here that I know of.....but, you still got that Mt. St. Helens over in your neighborhood!

    ooc
     
  12. Don Geiger

    Don Geiger

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    Keeping bed clean and rust free

    Ballistol works for me.
     
  13. Mark Warden

    Mark Warden

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    Thanks again for all the replies.
     

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