I need suggestions for wood storage

Discussion in 'Tutorials and Tips' started by Shawn Pachlhofer, Oct 12, 2013.

  1. Shawn Pachlhofer

    Shawn Pachlhofer

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    In real life, I'm a civil engineer - working mostly in land development and municipal projects.

    early this year I was fortunate enough to be able to harvest a large sycamore from one of my job sites.

    fortune has smiled on me again and I have a large number of trees that I am able to remove and keep, but they must be cut down in the next 2 weeks or less.

    I've already removed 2 large trees from this particular site, and estimate 10-12 more that I could remove and stockpile somewhere - the problem I face is - what is the best way to preserve the wood until I can get to it?

    The current project I'm dealing with has a 6 acre detention pond adjacent to a large creek, I've taken a white ash, cedar elm, hophornbeam and holly from the site. I still have several elms, hickorys, sweet gum, black gum and a large oak with a big burl on it to remove. These trees are old - the white ash was counted with 110 rings. I'd hate for them to be cut and just sold to the logger - and I have consent of the owner and general contractor to remove what I want.

    my shop runneth over, and my wife is starting to gripe that the "rest" of the family needs to be able to use the garage as well.

    suggestions?
     
  2. Steve Worcester

    Steve Worcester Admin Emeritus

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    At some point you will get to the same point as me, a 12x12 shed full of blocks, a shop with stuff waiting to be turned and bedrooms filled with more blanks.

    Sounds like you need to have a chain saw party and invite the local clubs to enjoy in the wood gorge.

    Once dry, it is dry forever but there is only so much time to turn, even if full time.

    Trade wood for anchorseal, cutting services, turning tutelage, whatever. You will make a lot of friends and fill up your sheds and firewood pile.
     
  3. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    Shawn,

    If it we me, I'd contact one of the local woodturning blank dealers and come to some arrangement. Maybe 20 blanks a year for 3-5 years. Or whatever seems fair in trade.

    I store wood in half log sections ripped through the pith about 3 feet long.
    Something I can move by myself. Wood like this will usually last up to six months outside without serious cracks although the color tends to deteriorate within a cople weeks. For example sweet gum turned at four months is going to look like crap compared to bowls turned within the first week. I seal the ends with sealtite. I store these outside in the shade of a live oak.

    If you have he space and equipment storing the whole logs works well too
    At some point they will get huge radial cracks but that is likely 8 months or longer. I have cut walnut logs laying on the ground for five years and the heartwood was great. Sapwood was gone.

    I often cut 1x1, 2x2, 3x3 4x4 three feet long from the half logs I cannot turn.
    Seal the ends an let dry under a roof for 2 years and then use them for ornaments, pens, boxes, tool, handles, gavels, kids classes.....
    I bought a couple of roll around steel wire shelves that can hold a lot of weight from SAMs club about $70 if I remember correctly.

    In all these methods i cut off the ends until there are no end checks. Usually 2" off the ends of the 1/2 logs, 4" off a whole log, the spindles i cut 1/4" slices until I cannot snap them by hand easily. I try to work all the blanks from my 3 foot log section at the same time.

    Share it without local turning club.

    With that much wood and a full time job it would be unusual if you could turn a 1/5 of it before you end up burning it except for the turning squares which will pretty much last forever.

    Al
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2013
  4. odie

    odie

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    Shawn.......

    Since storage space, and time seem to be the major factors, you might want to just look over what's available and harvest the most promising blocks, and seal them for long term storage.

    I have many prepared and sealed bowl blocks stored indoors, and in plastic storage containers. These plastic storage containers are readily available, and provide a barrier to the elements.....and are stackable. You can get a lot of blocks stored in a very compact space that way.

    It's my usual practice to rough bowls ASAP with a MC of 14%, or higher. Since the wood you'll be harvesting is all likely higher than that, it isn't possible to get to all of them any time soon, so storage in sealed wet blocks is the only option until you can get to them. Anything above around 16-18% MC is subject to mildew, so you should monitor for that possibility.

    Once bowl blocks are roughed and seasoned, they too, can be stored in the plastic stackable storage containers.

    ooc
     

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    Last edited: Oct 13, 2013
  5. Steve Worcester

    Steve Worcester Admin Emeritus

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    I started cutting blanks into shapes for what I was doing at that time. Turns out when they were dry, they weren't as useful for what I was doing now.
    I too use the roll around steel shelves from Sam's, big fan and have 4 of them full right now. Anymore, it has to be a unique find for me to partake, since my cup is over floweth. But I share when those in need are , umm, in need.

    Cut it, wax it, store it, turn it. What you can't store in basements, attics, sheds and bedrooms, give or sell it. You wouldn't be the first guy to buy a Woodmiser and create a market in your area.
     
  6. Breck Whitworth

    Breck Whitworth

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    my experience

    Shawn, with that much wood you might consider checking in your area for someone with a bandsaw mill who will cut your wood (on halves) into slabs of whatever thickness you want. The few times I have been able to get a large load of wood slabbed when it was green lasted to be turned at a much higher percentage (quality wise) after an extended period. If sticked between the slabs they will even dry better. smaller footprint for storage if stackable. Also easier to cut to size later as needed for whatever project you want. Otherwise store them in log form because they will last longer that way.
     
  7. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    Yea, what Breck said, try to find a portable saw mill and get some lumber. Thing with logs is that they start to do what every thing else does when it dies, they start to rot. Add to that bugs home in on the downed wood for a buffet. It is easier to store boards, and maybe a better market for it.

    Want to trade for some of your hop horn beam????? One I do not have in my stash.

    robo hippy
     
  8. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    Yea, what Breck said, try to find a portable saw mill and get some lumber. Thing with logs is that they start to do what every thing else does when it dies, they start to rot. Add to that bugs home in on the downed wood for a buffet. It is easier to store boards, and maybe a better market for it.

    Want to trade for some of your hop horn beam????? One I do not have in my stash.

    PM me.

    robo hippy
     

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