Jam or Vacuum chuck sealant

Discussion in 'Tutorials and Tips' started by Mark Hepburn, Jul 4, 2014.

  1. Mark Hepburn

    Mark Hepburn

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    I was wanting to make some jam chucks like those I saw in a class I took last month and gave it a try. David Ellsworth uses shelf liner and contact cement to adhere to the face of his chucks, but I had less than great results with that (as shown in the first photo).

    So I bought a can of Plasti-Dip at Lowes and gave it a try. It works really well. I mask of the outside and then just spray about 5 coats over a day or so onto the chuck. So far the results have been very good: no transfer to the work piece, and it has pretty good gripping quality. Also, it has the benefit of providing a seal for vacuum chucking.

    This may be old news but it's new to me, so in case anyone is interested... :)

    photo.jpg
     
  2. Douglas Ladendorf

    Douglas Ladendorf

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    Neat idea Mark. Did you seal the wood with shellac or anything first?

    Doug
     
  3. Mark Hepburn

    Mark Hepburn

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    Doug,

    Thanks. No sealer. In fact, I left the interior alone after turning. I was unsure about adhesion so sprayed directly on the wood.
     
  4. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    For jam chucking, I have used some textured kitchen drawer liner which is thicker and has better traction than regular liner material. I also have liner material for roll around tool chests which has great gripping and can be used for vacuum chucking because it is closed cell. There was also an AW article on vacuum chucking with a sealant made by mixing clear silicone caulk and corn starch. Mineral spirits can be used as a thinner. Acrylic paint can be added for color. The article is on page 21 of the April 2013 issue. The material is called Oogoo and is a homemade substitute for Sugru, an expensive commercial product. Unfortunately, the AW article misspelled Oogoo as Oogloo. More information can be found by Googling Oogoo. John Lucas, innovative guy that he is, has also used Oogoo as a decorating material on some turned items.
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2014
  5. Mark Hepburn

    Mark Hepburn

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    Thanks Bill, that sounds like a better solution. Thicker and more flex. And cheaper too.

    Note to self: Google oogoo, Google oogoo, Google oogoo...

    :)
     
  6. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Interesting chant.

    Google oogoo, Google oogoo, Google oogoo, Google oogoo, Google oogoo, Google oogoo, Oogle Googoo, Oogle Googoo, Oogle Googoo, Oogle Googoo, Oogle Googoo, Oogle Googoo, Oogle Googoo, Oogle Googoo, Oogle Googoo, Oogle Googoo ...
     
  7. Mark Hepburn

    Mark Hepburn

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    Somebody hep me, I been hypnotized.
     
  8. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I think that I remember saying something like that when I was a few months old. And, my parents though that it was only baby talk.
     
  9. Mark Hepburn

    Mark Hepburn

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    Little did they know you were just ahead of your time.
     
  10. hu lowery

    hu lowery

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    just a comment about the thick shelf liner

    Lowe's and I suspect most places now have the thick liner in an untextured version too.

    I do admire you folks with your sophisticated baby talk. The first thing I said got my mouth washed out with soap!

    Hu
     
  11. john lucas

    john lucas

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    I'm not sure there is a perfect vacuum chuck sealant material. If the material is too soft the bowl gets out of alignment. If it's too stiff it won't always seal when a bowl warps a little. I'll give the spray on rubber a try. Vacuum chucks are like clamps in the shop, you can't have too many.
     
  12. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    You've touched upon a great truth that I'm sure many have recognized in their quest for the perfect sealant.
     
  13. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    How true! Like many things in woodturning vacuum chucks have trade offs.

    Fun foam on a chuck made from PVC is rigid, provides a good seal on round surfaces, and a solid feel when turning.

    Thick neoprene on a chuck made from Sona tube (cardboard) is flexible, seals on near round surfaces, and has spongy feel when turning.

    Both have their uses
     

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