June Show-'n-Tell

Discussion in 'Newbie' started by Jamie Straw, Jun 28, 2016.

  1. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    June meeting is tomorrow, and this is a bowl month for moi. Definitely not ready for the gallery yet, but I'll post these pics so y'all don't think I make things up about Madrone and Chestnut and having trouble with sanding.:D This is definitely a "Warts and All" display, as I had all kinds of problems with the two larger bowls, and more than a couple with the little apple bowl. Please ignore the sawdust that infiltrated -- must have been on my shirt and jumped off.:rolleyes:
    Bowls_ 1_Edx.jpg Bowls_2Edx.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2016
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  2. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    I trust you are taking them to the club show and tell.
    You will see warts that no one else will....

    Al
     
  3. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    Yep, that is the meeting I was referring to:
    It's really hard, at my skill level, to put stuff out on the table. But I've done so 4 times now! I'm expecting 4 Stars just for sticking with it on the Madrone and chestnut bowls.:p:D
     
  4. Owen Lowe

    Owen Lowe

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    I think those are darned nice looking bowls, Jamie. I especially like the iron-stained (?) chestnut. I’ve found that a number of folks like a bowl with an unusual story.
     
  5. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    Ahhh, thank you! Yes, the chestnut is iron-stained, and it's quite striking. I have enough of that wood to make one other bowl, and enough unstained chestnut to make 5 or 6. Am definitely going to practice on the unstained stuff, want to get much better for the second stained one.
     
  6. Douglas Ladendorf

    Douglas Ladendorf

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    Nice Jamie. That is a more than respectable offering for show and tell. I know how intimidating it can be to put your work out for far more experienced turners.
     
  7. Jon Klobofski

    Jon Klobofski

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    Very nice Jamie! I too understand how intimidating showing your work can be. I frustrated my wife, because I can find flaws in everything I make.
     
  8. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    The green and black of the chestnut is especially nice.
     
  9. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    A shout out to John Lucas for not picking on my photography.:p The chestnut in person isn't so green. I've checked out Keith Burns' photography tutorial, and when I get closer to wanting to sell things, I'll set up a cube and some good lights (and come asking questions here!). Bowls were well-received at the meeting last night, but I was chastised for not signing them. A few months ago, I tried putting initials on the bottom of an early bowl with an engraver (have a selection of tips for it, courtesy of my husband's carving interests). The result was quite ugly and embarrassing. What to do?
     
  10. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    They say that we all go through the same stages of learning. I'm not so sure about my early stage. I never had any qualms about showing my stuff, although in retrospect I didn't realize how bad those efforts were. I mean, I really did some UGLY things to wood. Thankfully, my club has always been very encouraging to beginners and I gradually started seeing by example that sanding scratches, dig-ins, tear-out, and tool chatter couldn't be passed off as signs of creativity. Your bowls are light years ahead of my early efforts.
     
  11. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    @Jamie Straw
    Ditto what Bill said. You have a good eye.
    Keep in mind each bowl you do will be better than the last because you care about the turning.

    Al
     
  12. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    Wow, Bill, can't tell you how you've boosted my spirits! Thanks!
     
  13. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    Thanks so much, Al. As someone who's extremely spatially challenged, confidence about shapes doesn't come naturally. I'm wearing out Raffan's Art of Turned Bowls. :D Often, though, a spirit moves me in a certain direction, and it works! so there's hope.:cool:
     
  14. john lucas

    john lucas

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    Well I'm late to this. I don't fuss about photography unless it's really bad or you plan to use the photos for entry into shows. Your photos are clear and sharp that puts you ahead of at least half the photos posted. You don't need a light tent or cube or whatever they are calling them now. I shoot most of my work with one light shining through a panel made of PVC and white nylon, or a 2x3 foot soft box and one large white reflector.
    To improve your sanding slow down the wood or even stop it. Usually when you have an area that just won't sand out you can stop the lathe, sand that area by hand, and then turn the lathe back on and sand. I think what happens is the those bad areas may be just a hair below the other areas. The wood probably moves a tiny bit or perhaps the tools simply don't cut it perfectly round. When this happens and your sanding with lathe at medium or higher speeds the sandpaper simply flies over these areas. Slowing the wood down real slow often solves this problem but I've found stopping the lathe and concentrating on just those areas always solves the problem.
    Don't be afraid to show your work. I love seeing new turners work because you get to watch them grow and improve over the years. Also gives you a chance to offer advice when you see they are having problems
     
  15. Mark Hepburn

    Mark Hepburn

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    I agree with the others that these are very nice bowls, and while you will find flaws, there's a lot of good things I and others see about them..

    By the way the Chestnut is really beautiful. I like the detail on the exterior. Also, I really like the shape of the apple bowl.

    I have a Burning tool that I got at the symposium in Phoenix, but truth is I like my archival fine point marker. Cost A few bucks on Amazon, lasting a long time. And, no learning curve! :)
     
  16. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    Thanks much for the compliments and encouragement, Mark. I'm feeling much better about my work, as the frustrations fade and friends point out the good stuff. As far as signing goes, the fine-motor control in my hands is really bad these days, writing more than a couple sentences gets messy, and trying to burn or sign a bowl I've spent (seemingly) dozens of hours on...I'm thinking branding iron.:p Just have to decide what/how to sign. I've seen some really cool "signatures" -- be they initials like Odie does, or other. Will have to sit down with a glass of wine some night and figure it out.:D
     
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  17. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I would say that no matter how bad you may think that your signature might be, it is still your "real" signature and a thousand times better than some machine made signature. I have lost much of the sense of fine touch as well as proprioception due to multiple neurological conditions, but I rehearse my signature a few times on a practice piece of wood before doing the actual signing and it is my mark FWIW. About twenty years ago when I did a lot of flat woodworking, my wife gave me a custom branding iron for Christmas. I really like it, but it was really frustrating to make a decent uniform burn despite the fact that I was branding flat wood. Perish the thought of trying to brand a curved surface ... it's a lost cause. One of our club members has a laser engraving business so I had a brilliant idea that I would just give him a vector graphic of my standard woodturning signature. Well, the result was machine made perfect. After a few pieces, I decided that it was too perfect and I felt like this "too perfect signature" had all the class and personal touch of a mass produced item. If I were a production turner cranking out large numbers of pieces maybe I would see things differently, but I prefer to just hand sign things now. Sometimes I use a wood burning pen, sometimes a vibro engraver, and sometimes just an ink pen.
     
  18. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    I use a loop wire burning tip like the one on the left and have borrowed the use of a small ball like in the right. image.jpeg I write small. Use a medium heat and go slowly. I also use optivisors to see the result.
    Small inconspicuous.

    A long time ago I used to write big with a felt tip so people could read my name.
    A person judging my work into a show pointed out that my signature dominated the bottom and it detracted from the work.
    I replied " No one will be able to read it", when he told me I should make a smaller inobtrusive signature. He said, "everyone will know who you are"
     
  19. Owen Lowe

    Owen Lowe

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    Maybe after you sit down with a glass (or two) of wine you should give signing a try!

    Another thought, more constructive, is that perhaps you could have someone else write the info for you. My signature on my pieces isn’t so much a signature as modified printing of my name (+ wood species and year). It’s not like that signature is really how you would sign the endorsement on a check or your tax return.

    I stopped using ink-based signatures when I found it came off with solvent or smeared with finishes. Now I use either a Dremel engraver or fine-ball wood burner tip. I tend to favor the engraver because it’s more subtle.
     
  20. Mark Hepburn

    Mark Hepburn

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    Hey, how about an auto pen?:D
     

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