Just wondering if anyone here thinks this is a good deal........

Discussion in 'Woodturning Health & Safety' started by odie, Feb 3, 2015.

  1. odie

    odie

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  2. Gerald Lawrence

    Gerald Lawrence

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    Looks like a great price to me. I do not have Delta cannot remember brand (among the first) and not remote. I set mine up on outlet connected to lights and when lights are on it is. Don't wait till you notice dust in the air, and it is always there anyway.
     
  3. Dave Fritz

    Dave Fritz

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    Good price if the filters are in good shape and the qrade you want. I purchased an inexpensive one off ebay only to find the filters were 5 micron. The upgrade to 1 micron costs as much as the unit. Still a good deal and has served me well.

    Dave Fritz
     
  4. KurtB

    KurtB Moderator Staff Member

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    Kelly, this sounds like a good deal. I have a Jet unit, and the filters are washable and do a generally good job. Mine was about $200 a number of years ago. IMO any additional filtering in the shop is a good idea.
    Kurt
     
  5. Gary Chapman

    Gary Chapman

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    Odie,
    I have one-it's a good price. Problem- The filters fill up so fast and cost a lot. They are not washable so replacing them is expensive and if you are sanding,they will fill up. They do clean a lot of air.
     
  6. Mark Mandell

    Mark Mandell

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    I use a JDS 750 but the Delta seems to do a good job with the right filters for a friend. Good deal if the remote and time delay actually work.

    Just remember to clean/replace the filters on a regular basis.

    Keep in mind the comment about particle size. 5 micron filters will miss the really bad stuff of 1 mic and below. A unit that passes the small stuff is probably worse than nothing at all as it will tend to keep this circulation in your face.

    Don't give up your Resp-o-rator either way.
     
  7. Clifton C

    Clifton C

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    odie,
    I like mine. It helps with suspended dust, as it should, the other thing I like is in the wintertime it upsets the thermal balance much like a ceiling fan in reverse.
    So the shop heats up faster, or feels like it anyway. I suppose thats just an added benefit. The outermost filter is washable, but, I also rinse my inner filter, flowing the water reverse flow and hanging them up to dry, I have two of the inner bags and swap them out. All things considered, I think it's a good investment.
    The flip side, I've heard folks say that they stir up more dust then they filter, so, who knows...I still like mine.

    cc
     
  8. Steve Doerr

    Steve Doerr

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    Odie,
    I use a pre-filter on my Jet and it really helps save the filters that are part of the unit. I tape a 12X24 furnace filter on the front of mine and it really helps pick up the majority of the dust that is in the air. The smaller size particles pass thru and then are captured by the other two filters. Depending on how much sanding I do, I replace the pre-filter every two to four weeks. Just a thought.

    If I didn't have one and lived in the area, I would jump on it.
    Steve
     
  9. odie

    odie

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    Adding the furnace filter sounds like a great idea........^^^^^

    I just clicked on the link, and it looks like the unit has been sold......so, that's that!

    Still using the resp-o-rator.....that is a great inexpensive solution.....that is, if you don't mind scuba diving in your shop! Ha! I've gotten used to it. Not as much sanding as I did in the past, and the Airstream helmet is seldom used anymore.

    Thanks for the replies, all......

    ko
     
  10. MarkAndrews

    MarkAndrews

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    I have one and for what its worth, cleaning the filter is not a big deal. I bang it over the garbage can a few times and the pull of the intake fan improves considerably. If it gets really packed with dust I just blow it out from the back side with my air compressor. Eventually you have to replace the filter but you can get a lot of mileage out of it with repeated cleanings before you need to replace it. It REALLY cuts down on the amount of dust that ends up other places (like my kitchen/den hardwood floor).
    Mark
     
  11. Air filters mostly keep the SHOP clean...... Still need PPE

    Remember that shop air filters remove particles suspended in the air of the shop - the same thing that your lungs do without costing you for the electricity used. If you are generating enough dust to suspend it in your shop's air, you have a situation where efficient personal protection is absolutely necessary. I have a JDS 750 air filter that uses a 1 micron bag filter; I swapped-out the replaceable filter with a washable electrostatic filter which protects the bag filter, and also use an HVAC-style replaceable filter as a pre-filter (as has been described) to protect the electrostatic filter and to remove the largest particles first. I only use this air filter when I am not in the shop - if there is that much dust in the shop air to need a filter, I get out and let the filter do its job without any help from my lungs!

    Some people have described these filters as "shop dust filters" which help keep the shop clean from dust settling out of the air, and although it clearly does scrub the air of suspended particles, there is some evidence that these powered filters may also help keep particles suspended in the air that would otherwise settle out. Use of this kind of filter does not remove the need for personal protection equipment - some think that because they are filtering the shop air they they don't need to use personal equipment for particle filtration, whether powered or passive PPE, etc. which is NOT the case. Your lungs will do a very efficient job of filtering your shop air long before the air passes through the box and filters (however efficient) of your powered air filter! Another myth is that this kind of air filter can replace a vacuum-based dust collection system that collects wood dust at the point source where the wood dust is generated - NOT SO!! A dust collection system is BY FAR the best way to control airborne dust.

    I think the shop air filters are a bit over-rated (and over priced) for the amount of benefit they are supposed to give. I have one, and use it when a large amount of dust is generated - but under those rare conditions, I will leave the shop and keep the air filter running for at least an hour. I use my dust collection system EVERY TIME I sand or generate air suspended wood dust (like turning dry wood, sawing or routing MDF, power carving, etc.). The air filter does reduce the amount of dust settling out of the air, which supports the idea that this is primarily a "clean shop" filter rather than a "lung protection" filter. You STILL need PPE to handle the lung protection task.

    Rob
     
  12. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Amen to everything that you said, Rob!

    But, Rob ... if the dust is so fine that you can't see it, then it can't possibly be harmful ... or, can it? I am just wanting turn a small project so what's the harm in just breathing a tiny amount of invisible dust? I'll stop and put on a cheap paper comfort mask when my hacking and headache gets so bad that my common sense tells me it's time. Tell me I'm being smart ... please ... pretty please ... OK, be that way then. Maybe I'm ignoring the fact that the most dangerous dust is the invisible sub-micron stuff that can't be seen and that the respiratory system can't filter very well and that the lungs can't expel. Perhaps the Darwin Award isn't something worth pursuing.

    I think that far too many people are lying to themselves with all sorts of excuses why common sense makes an exception for them. It isn't much different than the excuses made by smokers years ago when they were no longer allowed to stink up the buildings where I worked. It wasn't much longer after that that smoking wasn't allowed in restaurants here.
     
  13. dbonertz

    dbonertz

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    Mark,
    Doesn't banging it on a garbage can or blowing it out with compressed air defeat the purpose. Your putting a lot of the dust back into the air as you breath it. Better to vacuum it off of the filter IMHO.
     
  14. allen jay

    allen jay

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    filter blowout

    Dale i think he probably takes it outside to do the banging and blowing, probably not inside his garage. but just guessing.




     
  15. dbonertz

    dbonertz

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    Yeah I thought of that Allen then it occurred to me that unless it is a windy day and you stand up wind you still have the same end result. Lots of dust your breathing while your banging and blowing.
     
  16. Rich Aldrich

    Rich Aldrich

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    According to the research done by the group that Bill Pentz worked with, the most harmful dust is 0.5 microns to 2 microns. These particles are too small to be filtered out before they get to your lungs and too large to be carried away by the blood stream.
     
  17. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Yes, I was hoping that folks recognized that my remarks were tongue-firmly-planted-in-cheek. Very serious respiratory diseases will result from prolonged exposure to very fine dust.
     
  18. Mark Hepburn

    Mark Hepburn

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    As Bill said, amen to everything you posted. Not to hijack this thread, but I have a shop fox hanging unit with I micron filter and two of the 1746 wall mount units that are rated at .3 micron. Still, when I walk in my shop (9 x 27) I find dust settled on horizontal surfaces. I also have a grizzly cyclonic DC with 6" inlet and all my tools connected. Longest run is about 12'.

    I run the filters all the time and have started running a high speed fan along with the filters after I finish for the day. Still I find dust so whaddaya do? I also wear a trend air shield so I Gus's I sound like an OCD patient - or Monk. It's a blessing and a curse! :D

    And so what else can one do?
     
  19. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    My shop is the great outdoors. Don't have to worry about dust settling on stuff and I get a continuous supply of "fresh" air (as fresh as can be expected in a large city). Climate control is sort of out of my hands, but most of the time it is tolerable.
     
  20. Mark Hepburn

    Mark Hepburn

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    I guess if we lived in L.A. it wouldn't matter would it? I'd be more worried about smog. :D

    When I am able one day to build a shop it will have huge doors at both ends and an attic fan. And I'll get a better leaf blower too.

    I wonder when I'm watching those old episodes of New Yankee Workshop (or Rough Cut Mac too) how many times they stop production to sweep and vac. I never see any dust. Come to think of it, Woodsmith shop shows don't either. Must be nice to have 5 guys with brooms keeping you shop nice between cuts.
     

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