lacquer for outdoors?

Discussion in 'Newbie' started by Jake Truxal, Dec 5, 2009.

  1. Jake Truxal

    Jake Truxal

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    can standard spray lacquer be used for exterior projects ?
     
  2. Dennis Ford

    Dennis Ford

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    Regular lacquer won't last long outdoors.
     
  3. MichaelMouse

    MichaelMouse

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    Of course there are sprays used for automotive finishes that will survive a lot of UV. Problem with wood is the uptake/loss of moisture and the movement that follows. Lacquer isn't as a flexible finish as oil or latex-based exterior stuff. Don't be like Thetis and forget to dip the heel, lest your piece be easily vulnerable to moisture.
     
  4. Steve Worcester

    Steve Worcester Admin Emeritus

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    Marine spar would work better, but even it will break down outdoors. Depends alot on sunlight exposure time.
     
  5. Joe Greiner

    Joe Greiner

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    Ditto spar varnish. But expect to sand and recoat at approx. 2-year interval.

    This has been exposed for about 4 years, and it's ready for treatment, but sanding will be a PITA.

    Construction details at http://mysite.verizon.net/vze8eg0u/kwameweb/

    BTW, "Kwame" is a previous moniker, and simply means "born on Saturday." I'm not African, AFAIK, but I like to keep people guessing.
     

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  6. Jake Truxal

    Jake Truxal

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    very cool Joe, I've been wanting to do something to spruce up our mailbox post. SPRUCE UP - that's woodworker humor :D:;)
     
  7. john lucas

    john lucas

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    A friend of mine who made outdoor sun dials swore by automotive lacquers. I questioned him about wood movement and he said they were designed to handle the movement of the metal on cars from the heat of summer to cold of winter. He passed away a few years ago so I can't ask him about what he actually used.
    From all I've read UV is the biggest problem. I played with several finished when I made heavy duty canoe racks for my truck topper. I tried epoxy, spar varnish and Polyeurethane. These were more or less amateur finishes purchased from Lowes or my local marine store. None of them lasted for more than a year. Of course this was stored outdoors in directs sun for the whole year.
    They need to be redone and I've been thinking about trying lacquer but it will be spring before I take the time to do it.
     
  8. Steve Worcester

    Steve Worcester Admin Emeritus

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    Automotive urethanes would work, but since they are so toxic, I didn't talk about them. They have great UV resistance and can handle the movement of the wood. BUT you really need to have forced air full face hoods and a space suit, since they are heavy with isocyanates.
     
  9. Gary Chapman

    Gary Chapman

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    outdoor finish

    I have a painting business and I can tell you with confidence that 40 years of painting tells me the only scceptale finish outside is acrylic paint. I have painted doors and I have put marine varnish on them and the only one that holds up over time is acrylic paint.
    Oil paints will eventually crack because wood moves and oil doesn't. Same for varnish but acrylic will give with the wood movement.
     
  10. allen jay

    allen jay

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    varnish

    go to jamestown distributing dot com and check out the eppifanes varnish. i used it on an exterior door and man did it look great. not cheap stuff but am hoping it lasts. fine woodworking did product testing on it and it got rave reviews. one thing that wasnt mentioned was the fact that this stuff can be sprayed much easier than it brushes but requires some addatives
    there arnt any wood laquers that will with stand the elements and very few poly urethanes that will either especially the water based stuff.
    just one mans opinion
    take it with however many grains of salt you wish
     

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