Mcnaughton Center saver users

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by chrisdaniels, May 2, 2016.

  1. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    The background view ain't too shabby either. :)
     
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  2. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    The prices for the McNaughton coring system are far better at Lee Valley than they are at Craft Supplies. For example the Lee Valley price for the standard size set is $359 and includes three curved blades, a straight blade, handle, gate, and tool post. The price at CSUSA is $393.95 ... and, surprisingly that doesn't include the straight blade at that price. You can, however, buy it separately for an additional $72.50.
     
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  3. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval

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    Wow! That was probably a good scare for you! The McNaughton definitely has a learning curve, when once you understand it, its by far the best coring system out there...
     
  4. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    But it is still a lot less work on a core and you do get multiple bowls.
    A cleaner surface would be nice!
     
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  5. john lucas

    john lucas

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    Zach Call Mike Hunter and see if he is still retipping them with some carbide cutters. I have one and like it a lot but I don't do enough coring to be an expert on this. It cuts cleaner and easier than the tips that came with the McNaughton. Still the most important thing is to keep the cutter at or above center all the way to the middle.
     
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  6. Zach LaPerriere

    Zach LaPerriere

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    Thanks a lot, John! I'll try calling Mike. I made note of the cutting above center—a great tip and I appreciate you repeating it in case I'd missed it. And who knows...senility has gotten the better of me more than once! :D

    I noticed Emiliano's quote about making your own knives from a while back. The Oneway website says of their knives (which are of course different) say: "The support fingers for knife sets #1 & #2 are constructed using 60,000 lb tensile carbon steel, whereas the support fingers for knife sets #3 & #4 are made from 100,000 lb chrome nickel steel."
     
  7. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    That's very interesting. Are they the same type of tips that have the raised edge like the carbide cutters on his hollowing tools?
     
  8. Steve Nix

    Steve Nix

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    I've got funnel makin down pat.. also improving on the real thing. One thing I've learned over the past two years is don't practice on your good wood. Practice makes , not perfect, but better.
     
  9. JeffSmith

    JeffSmith

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    I found the simplist system for setting the height is to back the turret away from your blank and extend the blade out all the way, aiming at the center of the blank. set your height so the blade tip is slightly above center. Cut a piece of pvc pipe and put it on the turret stem - you shouldn't neet to move it from that height ever.
    To set the angle, I do as Al said and place the blade on top of the blank with the tip at the center line of the blank, and right at the point you want to cut to (the bottom of your bowl). This assumes you're able to get up high enough to look directly down on the blank and blade. Keeping the point where it is, line up the blade where you want to enter the blank. pinch the blade at the point where it crosses the front edge of the blank with two fingers and draw the blade out, allowing the handle to swing to the right until the tip is between your fingers. Look at the handles angle to the bed, sight along it the find something its aimed at. Duplicate that angle with the blade in the turret.
    Hope that sounds as simple and quick as it is in practice. It works very well for me.
    With really nice wood, I always start with the largest core first, cutting a recess in the face so I can chuck it up and turn a tenon. chuck up that core and do it all again. I generally only aim for three bowls or four blanks from the setup. Trying for nested sets with 6 or 7 finished pieces is well beyond my skill set, but getting 3 or 4 decent sized bowls from a nice piece of wood rather than turning it all into shavings is my goal most of the time.
     
  10. Steve Nix

    Steve Nix

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    Great descriptive technique Jeff. Thanks for all the inputs,
     
  11. john lucas

    john lucas

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    Bill The type of cutter Mike put on my tool is an elongated diamond and has a slight cup behind the cutting edge. I believe it is a standard metal cutting carbide tip because I have some similar for my metal lathe. It is not the polished cupped circular cutters that he normally sells.
     
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  12. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Thanks, John. I might call him, but it might be an expensive proposition to put carbide cutters on all of the blades that I have. Maybe if I could get a diamond wheel for my Tormek I would be able to sharpen them.
     
  13. Zach LaPerriere

    Zach LaPerriere

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    Thanks, John. Does it look anything like this? This is from the Magnus Core Tool, and it throws clean shavings, even in the softest of spalted woods.

    Screen Shot 2017-08-24 at 12.46.16 PM.png
     
  14. Bill Weaver

    Bill Weaver

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    I have had one for several years now. It is the most scary tool I have ever tried to use. Can't master it no mater what I do. I think I'm going to find a one way system.
     
  15. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval

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    DOnt give up! Its not that hard to use. See if you can watch a friend do it....
     
  16. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Andy Cole from Hawaii demonstrated the McNaughton system on making a nested set of natural edge bowls at SWAT this past weekend. I attended his session twice because I found him to be very informative and entertaining ... not to mention that he handed out dark chocolate covered macadamia nuts to the audience. He also discussed the evolution of the system. I believe that he said that the large blades were originally about 7.5 mm thick and now they are about 5.5 mm thick. Also, the curvature of the blades have changed. He said that he prefers the older blades which are more stable, but changes the profile from the original straight across to a V shape like the newer Mark 8 design. Andy also used the straight blade to plunge in a couple inches when designing the size and shape of each of the nested bowls. I liked that idea so I will be ordering a straight blade.
     
  17. Zach LaPerriere

    Zach LaPerriere

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    That's a great tip, Bill, on plunging straight in. I've been doing that with my Magnus Tool, and I like that it can be done free hand with so little effort before putting the McNaughton in place.
     
  18. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval

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    He was our first demonstrator at our club. A great guy. I had given up on the system, thanks to him I’m coring now...
     
  19. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    The straight blades need the gate so that they won't twist once it's in the wood. There are other systems like the Johannes Michaelsen tool that have an arm brace and a side lever.

    Mike Mahoney doesn't use the straight blade for coring, but Andy said that Mike attended one of his coring demos and was favorably impressed by using the straight blade to start the cuts. I bought my sets from Craft supplies so they didn't include the straight blades. I plan on buying a large straight blade (Craft Supplies call it the Jumbo blade). It does make sense that a straight blade would be much better for starting a natural edge cut.
     
  20. Clifton C

    Clifton C

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    Bill, it's so fun when things go "click". Your description of the use of the straight blade was it...As some folks say, worth the price of admission. Then I went to Andy's web site and watched his video...Ties it all together. Now just waiting for the wood fairy...

    Ps. I really like the wood knob extension on his oneway handles...
    c
     

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