Metric System

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by Bob Chapman, Jul 14, 2014.

  1. Zach LaPerriere

    Zach LaPerriere

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    Apparently our ancestors had the same frustration...this is from Alaska's most famous comic, Tundra:

    Tundra.jpg
     
  2. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    :D :D :D
     
  3. Glenn Lefley

    Glenn Lefley

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    Here in canada you Always buy two of everything. One metric ,one imperial. And then you put them in the same box labeled say "allen keys" , then curse and swear and go through every one when you need to fix something. Not that I would do something like that:rolleyes:.
    Had to change out my chuck yesterday :mad:.
     
  4. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval

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    I grew up with metric, as I stand earlier. I can do what you are saying you can do with the metric, but not the us! lol Main thing, obviously both work...
     
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  5. Zach LaPerriere

    Zach LaPerriere

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    Absolutely, Emiliano. I think it benefits us to work in both metric and imperial—stretches our brain in a way that's uncomfortable at first, just like speaking a foreign language.

    When I was 17 I left home and lived in New Zealand for a year where suddenly I had to eat with a fork in my left hand and communicate in metric to anyone under 40. In my early 20s I worked as a carpenter for a while in Canada in both metric and standard. Metric will never be my first choice for most things, but I'm glad I developed the brain "muscles" to do it. We become better people by trying new things, especially as we get older.

    Maybe I'll head out to the shop, put my lathe in reverse and turn on the other side for a while... :D
     
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  6. Fred Belknap

    Fred Belknap

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    Be sure to lock down your chuck set screws, they are allen wrenches 3/16", 6mm,. Keep digging till you find the right one or close to it.
     
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  7. john lucas

    john lucas

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    Running a photographic Darkroom for 20 years I was constantly working with metric and imperial. Somethings came one way, and other came others so I just dealt with it. In my own shop I use metric when it's easier and inches when they are easier. I was hard to find a metric folding rule.
     
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  8. Ely Walton

    Ely Walton

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    I also remember the halfway "conversion" decades ago. From an impact viewpoint, I had to buy metric sockets, wrenches, etc. So now when fixing something, and the socket doesn't quite fit, I have to dig through a bigger pile to pick out the appropriate size... And nuts, bolts and screws are totally out of control... The only bright side is that I recently bought one of those inexpensive digital calipers that reads fractional inches, decimal inches or metric units at the push of a button... Now that is useful!

    The nice thing about standards is that there are so many to choose from!

    Ely
     
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  9. Zach LaPerriere

    Zach LaPerriere

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    Absolutely! My General Lathe has metric threads with standard heads...or was that the other way around? I can never remember.
     
  10. john lucas

    john lucas

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    Zach I saw Graeme Priddle start a demo one time. He had the lathe in reverse and put the bowl gouge underneath the tool rest and turned on the bottom side of the turning. Everyone started laughing of course and he said "what's so funny, don't you all turn this way.
     
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  11. egsiegel

    egsiegel

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    All of it.
     
  12. Grant Wilkinson

    Grant Wilkinson

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    As a woodworker - well sort of - in Canada, my irritation is that Canada only partly adopted metric. We buy plywood in 4 x 8 sheets. We buy 2 x 4's. Even Oneway, a canadian made lathe, measures swing in inches.

    But, we buy gas in litres, lunch meat in grams and measure temperature in celsius. Then, just to really mix things up, we don't care how many miles per gallon we get out of our cars. Instead, we care about how many litres of gas per 100 kilometers we burn.
     
  13. Leo Van Der Loo

    Leo Van Der Loo

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    Grant, you know politicians will always keep on fixing things, even when it isn’t broken, until it is :rolleyes:

    The chicken farmers dropped the ball I’m sure, as they had the chance to sell eggs in ten-packs instead of the dozen pack for the same prize ;).

    Oh and calling a 2x4 a five by ten, should work fine as these numbers don’t really give the real dimensions anyway :D

    122x244 makes for a standard sheet of plywood, cm we mean, all the rest of the world is using the metric system and the same material, maybe we don’t even know that the material is already metric what we buy, 10 mm thick plywood or twelve, we call it ⅜ or ½” !! :confused:
     
  14. Leo Van Der Loo

    Leo Van Der Loo

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    Zach that there is a Neanderthal, and you know what happened to them :p
     
  15. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    One theory discussed in my anthropology class was that Cro-Magnon Man ate them all. Yuk! :-(
     
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  16. Arkriver

    Arkriver

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    When I worked for the US Forest Service, we used chains as unit measure quite a bit. Ten square chains equals one acre. If I remember correctly a chain is 66.6 ft. How knots fit the measuring systems I am not sure. Allyn
     
  17. Zach LaPerriere

    Zach LaPerriere

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    Funny about the Neanderthals! I've heard current theories that suggest our ancestors interbred with them. If true, probably all the modern Neanderthal nuckleheads like myself show a preference for the imperial system. :)

    A knot does makes sense. Boat and ship people use knots all the time for navigation. A nautical mile is 1/60th of a degree of latitude. The divisions on nautical charts are in 60ths. So as an example, my neighbors just sailed to the 80th degree of latitude, way north of Alaska. Because there are 90 degrees of latitude, I can quickly know that they came within 600 nautical miles of the North Pole. That's a measurement at least I can understand, because all navigation by boat around here is in knots. You can just add about 10% to get statute miles.

    Because latitude is still used as a division of 90 from the equator (180 between poles), kilometers don't have an easy equivalent with lattitude. It's a bit like hours and minutes...they make intuitive sense if you're accustomed to them.
     
  18. stu senator

    stu senator

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    A Knot is a nautical mile per hour, or 6,076.1 ft feet per hour. or 1 knot= 1.15078 mph

    Stu
     
  19. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    According to National Geographic, the Neanderthal are alive and well among those of us who are of European or Asian descent as they interbred with Homo sapiens. If you have red hair, you might be more Neanderthal than average.
     
  20. RichColvin

    RichColvin

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    And now they're politicians!
     

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