Narrowing down sanding-kit choices

Discussion in 'Newbie' started by Jamie Straw, Sep 12, 2015.

  1. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    Wha'??

    OK, had no idea sanding wet wood was part of the process! This is funny, could you enlighten me plz?
     
  2. Dwight R Rutherford

    Dwight R Rutherford

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    Hand sanding and power sanding have been commented on, I'm curious why inertia sanders haven't been discussed as another way to sand turnings. I am aware of some professionals that use them. What are your opinions of this method?
     
  3. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I have the Sorby inertia sander, but I haven't used it in years. It has a plain bearing that isn't protected from dust so it didn't take too long before there was a lot of wear that caused it to not spin as smoothly. I have seen the inertia sander designed by the sanding Glove and it looks to be very well engineered including sealed ball bearings. I spoke to a few individuals at SWAT who owned them and they seemed to be very pleased with them although they seemed to be exceedingly expensive for something without a motor. The trouble that I had with mine (Sorby) was that I felt restricted on how they needed to be oriented to maintain control of speed as well as getting a desired sanding action.

    Like Odie, I have a genuine Made in USA Sioux angle drill that I got at around the turn of the century.
     
  4. john lucas

    john lucas

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    I tried inertia sanders but just didn't like them. I think part of the problem is that on problem areas I often sand with the wood stationary. That of course won't work with Inertia sanders. I also found that they don't work very well on platters and my hand mirrors when sanding near the center. That's of course because the surface speed of the center of the wood isn't very great and simply doesn't rotate the disc well. Give me power or hand sanding any day. When hand sanding it's much easier to sand with the grain to get rid of those odd grit lines left from the prervious grits. You can also sand cross grain to help show what's happening when you change grits so you know you've removed all the sanding lines from the previous grits. Most of my projects are small so hand sanding is very viable. ON larger turnings it's simply much faster with power sanding although I still use all the tricks like using different areas of the disc so that it sands in different directions to help see where you've sanded and if you've removed all the previous sanding lines.
     
  5. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    I don't often sand wet wood. I mostly finish turn wet wood let it dry and sand off the lathe.

    Sanding a natural edge bowl from a crotch or a hollow from a burls or crotch figure while it is wet will give a nice rippled texture when dry.
    Once dry the sanding needs to cut the tops of the ripple offs.

    I do them both ways
    Al
     
  6. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    Just a term I use for Velcro disc holder, perhaps incorrectly.
    strictly speaking a mandrel has to go through something like the drum sander or stacked scotch brite discs
     
  7. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    Thanks, John, I need to put together an affordable beginner's kit for smallish bowls (max 8" diameter, several smaller than that). My Neiko sander arrived yesterday, but I'm away from the lathe most of next week. Would like to order from him Wednesday the 23rd so stuff will be here shortly after I come back. (Leaving hubby behind, taking a trip to the SoCal desert to see siblings).

    That sander is much heavier than I expected from the pictures, but balanced fairly well. Noisy, noisy though!
     
  8. Dean Center

    Dean Center

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    If you tell any of the vendors mentioned in this thread what you want to accomplish, I bet they'd put together a starter kit for you, even if they don't list one on their site. (If you're not going bigger than 10 or 12 inch bowls, a 2" set will be all you'll need, for example)
     
  9. Hy Tran

    Hy Tran

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    I have a bunch of baggies of blue discs from Vince's and a homemade inertia sander (using the magnetic ball bushing from Eddie Castelin and a Napa auto parts store Velcro sanding disc holder). I also have both handheld cordless and corded drills, but I find the weight unwieldy. So far, I haven't turned anything bigger than 12" diameter, so I find the inertia sander, combined with a bit of elbow grease works just fine.

    At the Pittsburgh symposium just a few months ago, I bought another disc holder pad from both Vince's and from Ken Rizza (Woodturners Wonders), and several feet of Abranet in assorted grits from Steve's (turningwood.com). The intention is to use the abranet with elbow grease (not to be confused with turner's elbow; please don't ask me how I know about turner's elbow--almost always the right elbow).

    I don't get an endorsement compensation, but I am happy with all these products, and the gentlemen who sell them.

    Hy
     
  10. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    Thanks, Hy, I'm enjoying Southern California desert weather this week, but will be ordering stuff soon. I'm thrilled (not really an overstatement) about the rolled Abranet. And Vince's reputation convinces me that's the place to start for discs. If I don't fall asleep after going out to dinner with the family tonight, I'll re-visit his web site. :D I do plan to avoid turner's elbow -- have had enough orthopedic surgeries for this lifetime!:p
     
  11. Hy Tran

    Hy Tran

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    Turner's elbow doesn't respond to orthopedic surgery as far as I know. But a tetanus shot is advisable :p
     
  12. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I don't know what turner's elbow is, but I assume that you mean some sort of tendinopathy which is an inflammation from repetitive motion, excessive strain, and dare I mention weakening tendons due to ... aging. These type of injuries respond well to physical therapy, rest, and ibuprofen or naproxen although the healing process is slow ... I know from experience. Unless there is some sort of severe injury that actually breaks tendons, there wouldn't be anything that surgery could repair.

    As far as getting a tetanus shot goes, I get a booster shot every five years. I'm always getting cuts on my hands from something like splinters or checking tool edges for sharpness. :rolleyes: Gotta quit doing that.
     
  13. Hy Tran

    Hy Tran

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    Turner's elbow: Right elbow, meet tailstock.
     
  14. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Oh, THAT thing! It serves a useful purpose to let you know the height of the lathe centerline.
     
  15. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    yet another reason to remove the center point. :)
     
  16. Gerald Lawrence

    Gerald Lawrence

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    Power sander

    Not what you asked, but had to share. I had my 55 degree sander burn up the bering and was looking for a new option (with bering in something other than plastic housing) . I remembered that I have a Ridgid Job Max (battery op) and looked up options. I already had a right angle impact driver attachment. Thought on getting second battery. When looking at ebay found a corded unit much cheaper than a battery. This tool is also available in pneumatic version. Just got the electric for $22 plus shipping this week. Tried it yesterday on the outside of a bowl and it works very well. Read something in a review about speed of the tool only 550, but info on new says 0-20,000 . Trigger is easily controllable and hand does not cover any vents.

    Not Sure of the weight as the impact driver shows 2.4 pound and then hand held unit is either 2.1 or 5 , I think 2.1 is correct guess these website descriptions cannot be relied on.
    http://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-JobMax-3-Amp-Multi-Tool-Starter-Kit-R28600/202672276
     
  17. john lucas

    john lucas

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    I've been using a standard Dewalt 3/8" drill for many years. It's not a one handed affair like the angled drills but I find I have much more control using both hands with my elbows next to my body. A lot less strain on my wrists which like many of you are starting to have tendonitis and arthitis and all the other itis things. I burned through a dozen cheap Black and Deckers drills before I bought the Dewalt which at the time was $64. Best money I ever spent. It's Keyless so I can change my sanding mandrels in seconds. I went to a sanding mandrel for each grit which not only makes it very fast but I can't remember the last time I had to change the velcro.
     
  18. john lucas

    john lucas

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    Forgot to add. I keep a file card, and brass brush handy as well as a crepe sanding disc cleaner. When sanding green wood or wood that has resin the discs clog up really fast. I simply hold the disc against the file card ( a metal brush with really short bristles used to clean metal working files) and it's almost as good as new. Sometimes the brass brush works just as well and isn't quite as hard on the discs which will of course wear out eventually. I try not to over use any disc of course because you want quality sanding but I find this works really well and does save me money. I will use Abranet on green wood but it's quite a bit more expensive than Vince's blue discs.
     
  19. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    Thanks, John, I'll check out the file cards. I could use them for the pile of metal-working files we have too! Yes, Abranet is a little pricey, especially when bought in small amounts, but it lasts so much longer than regular sandpaper! I just haven't determined whether the coarse pieces leave deeper lines on the stock than the standard paper.
     
  20. Jamie Straw

    Jamie Straw

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    Wrist and hand problems

    I may go this direction if the cheapo angled drill goes belly up quickly. I have a wealth of experience with wrist tendinitis (and carpal tunnel). A couple of thoughts for everyone to keep in mind:
    • If your wrists and hands tend to ache after a turning session, ice them right away to reduce the inflammation. Inflammation tends to build on itself, so it's important not to wait. We have well water, so I can actually just run the cold water over my wrists for 3 or 4 minutes and it really helps. Longer would be better. A bag of frozen black-eyed peas or regular peas works great!
    • It's tempting to self-diagnose arthritis, especially in the wrists, hands and fingers. If anyone thinks they have arthritis, it's best to get a confirmation (or not) from a doctor (blood test, x-rays). Why? Because arthritis is helped by movement of the joints. Tendinitis can feel like arthritis, and yet is made much worse by continuing the repetitive motion that caused it in the first place.
    • Some arm and hand difficulties actually have their origins in the upper back -- how we use the muscles of the shoulder, around the shoulder blade, and the thoracic spine area. Keeping those areas strong and moving correctly is important to using the arm and hands efficiently.

    [sliding soap-box out the door.......:)]
     

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