Need New Lathe

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by Steven Nicholson, Jun 29, 2017.

  1. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    So very true.

    You more or less rule out all lathes with sliding headstocks if you don't like the motor placement on the handwheel side of the headstock. I have a Robust AB and like John Lucas with his Powermatic, I typically park the headstock somewhere around the middle of the bed unless turning a long spindle.
     
  2. odie

    odie

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    Question for John and Bill.....

    Does the sliding headstock alter lathe vibrations according to placement?

    -----odie-----
     
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  3. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Short answer is no.

    A piece of wood that is mounted so that it is out of balance will be out of balance by the same amount regardless of where the headstock is parked. Large lathes such as Robust and Powermatic are structurally stiff enough that they are basically rigid bodies that don't twist or flex while the spinning piece of wood is trying to shake itself loose from the spindle. If the floor isn't flat and one of the four feet is just floating then it might cause the lathe to shake. Assuming that all four feet are firmly on the floor, I doubt that you would notice any change due to headstock position. A really nice feature of the Robust is that the legs can be adjusted to level the lathe as well a "settling" adjustment to give it a more solid connection to the floor.

    Even if a lathe could be made rock solid, wood is relatively flexible and if you jab it with a sharp steel poker, the wood will react by vibrating, fluttering, singing, or howling. This could induce sympathetic acoustic vibration in the lathe especially if it is lightweight.
     
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  4. john lucas

    john lucas

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    I'm not sure about the motor problem either. All motors are suspended by the mounting end whether they are housed inside or hanging off the side or back, so stability is not an issue. Keeping the motor cooler is a good reason to hang it outside. Hanging a motor below is ideal but that only works on lathes that have a fixed headstock, no swivel or sliding.
     
  5. Brian McInturff

    Brian McInturff

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    Bill, still not sure where you got that price since he doesn't have prices listed on his website. Unless you emailed Rod. He very well may still honor the sale price too. If someone is looking for one then all they have to do is contact Rod. The Stubby is a lathe that can fit some people's circumstances. I rank it right there with the Oneway and Robust lathes albeit in a much smaller footprint.
     
  6. Steven Nicholson

    Steven Nicholson

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    Thanks for the info, I was wondering about that approach.
     
  7. Steven Nicholson

    Steven Nicholson

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    Has to do with the way my shop is setup. I think I should rearrange.
     
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  8. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I was starting to reply in another thread and somehow a fragment of my post wound up here. I was trying to find where I thought that I saw the price of the S1000 mentioned, but couldn't find it. I thought that I saw that it was $7600 AUS, but I might have that confused with something else. The Stubby site does state that the 3HP motor option is an additional $800. Trying to figure out the US import tariffs is impossible. It's dependent upon the country of origin, if some parts come from different countries then that is also factored in. Also cost, weight, quantity, and category of material are all part of the equation. The tariff can be as high as 20%, but generally it is much lower. Australia by contrast has the simplest system in the world. The combined total of duty plus tax amounts to about 15% of the cost regardless of the country of origin, no quantity discount, and no good buddy discounts.
     
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  9. Leonard Niemi

    Leonard Niemi

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    I went with a larger clone of the 3520b which is the Grizzly G0766. $1750 delivered. Very happy with mine.
     
  10. John Nicholson

    John Nicholson

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    You would never go wrong with a 25" Robust as I have one and love it.
     
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  11. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Ditto!. There's nothing to not like about the Robust AB.
     
  12. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    Need to speak for yourself. :)
    I enjoy turning on the AB. I think the AB is a terrific machine.

    However 6 things I like a better on the Oneway are:
    Banjo on the oneway is better all around.
    3 pulleys give a finer control of speeds than 2
    Out board turning capablilty
    Control pedestal at eye level
    Spindle lock placement and ease of use
    Index wheel and lock are easier to use.

    Not a biggy but Onway's Extra weight and extra length of the bed come in handy once in a while

    Things I like better on the AB
    The AB changes height in minutes. Takes at least a 1/2 hour to change height on the Oneway
    Like the AB switch on the spindle lock
    Handwheel on tailstock is smoother

    :)
    There are fewer things not to like on the Oneway 2436. :)

    AB is a fine machine just won't be the best for lots of folks.
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2017
  13. odie

    odie

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    Unless the Oneway has changed specifications lately, their lathes are still not offered in 1/1/4" x 8tpi spindle threads.......and have neither sliding, or swivel headstock. The spindle threads would be a killer right there, and my next lathe would have to have a movable headstock.

    How about the price, Bill?.......I really do like the AB, but the price is not do-able for many turners. I still am not able to even think about upgrading my old Woodfast lathe, but when that time comes, the AB is definitely on my dream list. At this point, the new Powermatic 3520c is very appealing, but even there, it isn't within my financial prospects. I suppose it's possible if I wanted either of these lathes badly enough......but, I still am having trouble believing the quality of my turnings could be improved with the upgrade. Someday though.......it'll probably happen! ;)



    -----odie-----
     
  14. Ely Walton

    Ely Walton

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    Anyone have experience with the new Laguna 2436? Add the 20 inch extension with tailstock riser and it looks like it would be very nice...

    73 Ely
     
  15. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    For most folks the switch to M33 3.5 and #3MT is not a big deal.
    Involves buying a chuck insert... many folks have made the switch from 1x8 to a larger size.
    I made the switch from 1x8 (ancient delta) to 1.25x 8 (20" woodfast) to M33x3.5 (Oneway 2436)

    You have a large accumulation of faceplates and chucks that will be more of an issue.

    The big advantage of the oneway is using the outboard for hollowing bowls and hollow forms.
    It can be more convenient than sliding the headstock for many operations less so for some others.

    Robust is available with M33 x 3.5 and a #3 taper.
     
  16. odie

    odie

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    Hi Al......:D

    True, for some turners, it wouldn't be that much of a problem. In my case, it would require all new faceplates, or deal with a spindle adapter that would push the weight further from the spindle bearings. There are about a dozen Precision Machine screw center faceplates, and I am a dedicated faceplate turner, except for roughing. My Stronghold chucks are adaptable with new inserts, as you say. No question the Oneway lathes are first class lathes......just wouldn't work for me. :(

    -----odie
     
  17. charlie knighton

    charlie knighton

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    #3 taper got to be less vibration......after my first upgrade I concluded that technique with your tools is as important as which lathe makes the wood go round.....I think we all lust for "the lathe"....but that is part of kicking the tires in the vendor room.......enjoy the new possiblities.....
     
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  18. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    Folks who have $5k to spend should buy a $3k lathe and spend $2k on a couple of classes.
    skills will increase turning success and enjoyment more than a new lathe.

    We all know you can do great work on a crappy lathe
    And crappy work on a great lathe.
     
  19. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I haven't had the opportunity to use a Oneway and compare them, but the banjo on my lathe glides effortlessly. I keep the banjo bottom surface clean and wax it as well as the lathe bed. I like the wedge lock on the tool post. It's very easy to loosen and tweak the tool rest height without the need to overcome stiction. Being able to reverse the locking lever is a nice feature. The banjo locking lever can also be moved either left or right.

    My Robust AB has three pulley steps. I do 99.99% of my turning in the low speed range. I noticed that the newer models now have a two step pulley. I haven't looked into the specs to see what the two ranges are, but depending on what the ranges are, it might make more sense to only have two ranges. I wouldn't automatically assume that the two ranges are equal. Since I hardly do any belt shifting I I really can't say which configuration I would prefer.

    Well I can do outboard turning by sliding the headstock to the tailstock end as long as I don't need tailstock support. Can you put the tailstock on the outboard side of your Oneway? I have the optional outboard tool rest so theoretically I could turn anything that clears the floor.:D

    I prefer the controls at hand level since I can't operate them with my eyes. Maybe that swinging arm is nice, but to me it seems like an obstacle. I think that I would prefer the control box with a magnet so I can stick it where I want it.

    Spindle lock is below the handwheel... Moves up and down ... couldn't be any easier. And, as you said, the Robust has an electrical interlock.

    I haven't used it much, but I like the indexing on my lathe. It uses a screw so it isn't as fast as a spring loaded plunger, but I'm not so fast either so we're a good match. I haven't seen how the newer model with the small handwheel works.

    I'm on a diet and trying to lose some avoirdupois.

    I think that, generally speaking, people like the lathe they have more than the one they don't have. The Oneway is a great lathe, but it wasn't my choice.
     
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  20. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval

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    Learn something every day! I had no idea about this...
     

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