Nova DVR?

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by Scott Regenbogen, Jun 27, 2009.

  1. Scott Regenbogen

    Scott Regenbogen

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    Hey,
    Does anyone have any experience with this macihne? By the time you add the bed extension and the base it winds up about $1000 less than the PM3520. This is however a 110v single phase machine which means no rewiring, etc. Just wondering if this is a heavey duty enough machine to turn pieces that are at it's capacity - approx. 16" dia.
     
  2. john lucas

    john lucas

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    It is a pretty nice machine. I would have to look at the Jet 1642 as well. The jet has a sliding headstock which is nice if you do bowls and hollow turning. You do need the room in your shop to do that however.
    The Nova has a rotating head. This is good and bad. When rotated you can turn larger work but sometimes the tool rest won't reach or is in an odd position. The proprietary motor works fine but if you keep the lathe for many years I worry about having to replace a motor that might not be available. The motor and controller on the Jet can both be replaced with aftermarket pieces.
    I'm sure you will get a lot more opinions. Both of those lathes are good machines. Neither of them has the mass of the Powermatic which is why it's worth the extra grand.
     
  3. Frank F

    Frank F

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    I briefly looked at the Nova DVR when I bought my lathe. I was impressed by the motor technology and that it used 110 Volts. But, I couldn't get passed that in order to change speeds, you have to hold down a button until you reach the desired speed or select from 5 user programmed speeds. I prefer a knob that you turn.

    This is just my opinion. I know other turners who love theirs and have no problem with speed changes. I suggest you try one.

    Frank
     
  4. Bernie Weishapl

    Bernie Weishapl

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    I have the DVR and love it. I bought the bed extension and the outboard turning rig. I have turned a 19" bowl and several platters. I core 16" bowl blanks with no problem. I am not a production turner so the speed setting is no problem besides you have 5 pre-set speeds and I have them set to what I use most of the time for turning different pieces. I bought mine due to the fact that when we bought the house the shop was wired for 110 V. The cost to rewire would have added another $1000 to the PM so that was a added expense.
     
  5. Alan Trout

    Alan Trout

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    Scott,

    I love mine. It has good capacity, nice footprint, super smooth, nice accessories, and the ability to make your own stand anyway that you want. I have mine wired for 220V and has excellent power.

    Here is a pic of mine. I have the swing away bed segment so I have about 45" between centers when needed. I fabricated the stand out of steel and have the support arm added to the bed segment to give support when the extra length is needed. With the support in place the segment is as stiff as the rest of the lathe but can be swung out of the way when you don't need it. It is also a great place to park the tailstock when you need to get it out of the way. All up weight with lathe, stand, and ballast is right at 830lbs. It is as or more stable than any PM3520 or Jet 1642 that I have turned on. Its a great machine and fits my needs very well.

    Of course if you decide to do your own stand there is a bit of work involved but it can be a fun project that gives great rewards.

    Good Luck

    Alan
     

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  6. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    I prefer the sliding headstock to the pivoting one. Just more convenient for me. I prefer the variable speed to the 5 preset speeds. I have probably used every conceivable speed variation on my lathe, including the 3 speed ranges (pulleys). I prefer the 220 to the 110, especially if you are going to run bigger pieces. Getting an extra circuit isn't that big of a deal, especially if you have a friend who knows electricity. The Nova is a fine lathe, I just think the others have more features. Of course, you have to pay for them.
    robo hippy
     
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  7. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    I too suggest taking a look at the jet 1642.

    I have turned on both machines.
    I would choose the Jet over the DVR.

    I really dislike the controls on the DVR.
    for off the DVR has a small raised area in the touch pad.
    The jet has a big red button easy to find in a panic
    the up/down speed control is quite slow in response
    The jet has a dial that is much more responsive.

    The DVR I used for demos had plenty of power and handled 14" bowls well.

    Happy turning,
    Al
     
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  8. MichaelMouse

    MichaelMouse

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    No question at all that it is a worthy lathe. It turns at capacity over the bed easily, and if you want to do larger you can swing the head and take advantage of the long banjo and rest. I have its little brother, the one with the 8 preset speeds, and use three. If I had the DVR or the 16-24 I would use reverse and turn at 3:00 rather than 9:00 on the oversize.

    Still not sure what infinitely variable speed does for you. Everybody says they speed the work up until it shakes the lathe - WHY - then slow it down until it stops shaking. If that seems important, I guess you should get one with the capability. Betting you'll just set up appropriate speeds for your circumstances and use them to cut wood rather than play with dials.

    As to the slide to end versus rotate, I am again baffled. I stand up straight, and am able to cut without lean into the center of rotation. Beyond that it's rising, so why use it? I do know that I only have to keep a 2' x 2' "box" for the turner to stand in, and can put a bench up against the tail end rather than reserve space there or haul some iron behemoth around. Big difference in a small shop.

    Only negatives I've heard that could be proven, rather than prejudice, is that like all electronics it hates dirt and heat. Keep it clean inside and out.

    Or save some money and get the 8-speed 1624.
     
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  9. David Wilkins

    David Wilkins

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    I have a DVR xp with outrigger and the deluxe cast legs. It has full power right down to 100 rpm, and with 5 favorite speeds being easily reprogramable it it a snap to bump speeds to where you want them. I still have mine connected to 110v, it has as much power as a oneway 1640 I have worked on.
    I did find I had to adjust to the controls, the push button speed changes were different than the reeves drive I had previously. I find it very convenient now. You were wondering about size? I've turned 22" bowls, and a multi axis platter that is about 20" and I'm honestly looking forward to doing more like it.
    I have two things I would improve about my lathe. The first is I should get a bed extension, that is clearly my own fault. The second is a remote set of controls. Something tells me I'm not alone in this, maybe they are working on it.
     
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  10. n7bsn

    n7bsn

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    David
    Remote is something that others have done. I know there was a "how I did it" over on the old MSN Teknatool Group. Since MSN shut it down... It appears to be gone, as I just glanced at the Yahoo Group (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/teknatool/ ) didn't see it

    At one time, Teknatool had an announcement over at their page, that they were working on one, but that was a couple/three years ago, and I haven't been able to find it lately.
     
  11. john lucas

    john lucas

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    I haven't done it but I'm pretty sure you could hook the Powermatic remote up to the Jet. All they've done is wire it in series with the on off switch. It takes about 5 minutes to install it on the powermatic.
     
  12. Matt Owen

    Matt Owen

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    I've had my DVR XP for a little over 4 years, and knowing what I know about it today, I would make the same purchase. The preset speeds are a nice feature once you get in the habit of changing speeds with them, which took me about two or three turning sessions. As far as power, I couldn't tell a difference between it and the Powermatic 3520B that I've turned on. Also, I've got the "sheet metal" stand with about 250 Lbs. of sand, and it is just as stable as the Powermatic. The one that I've turned on, though, did not have any weight added to it.

    For outboard turning, I made my own outrigger for about $30.

    I find the swiveling head feature to be wonderful. It only takes me a minute to align the tailstock and headstock when I'm finished. If you're really fussy about those things, you can get the double ended morse taper, but I've found the point-to-point method works well for alignment.

    If your motor ever dies, that may be a big issue as a replacement (if available) will probably be expensive. However, I hate changing pulleys, and love the direct drive the XP offers.

    Just my two cents.

    Matt
     
  13. Mark Warden

    Mark Warden

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  14. Jim Silva

    Jim Silva

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    I bolded a part of this post that I found potentially confusing. The DVR has 5 preset speeds (that can also be set to whatever you prefer) AND variable speed through it's touchpad from 100 - 3500rpm. I think people see the word PRESET and presume that's all it has. Just hoping to provide a little additional clarity. :)


    Jim
     
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  15. LHauch

    LHauch

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    Scott,
    The previous posts provide lots of good information, and I cannot argue with any of them. I own a DVR and I have used a friend's PM 4224.
    My 2 cents worth - What do you want to turn the most, what really sparks your interest? If you think you will be turning mostly large hollow forms, then I would recommend the PM if you have the space. If you plan on turning large natural edge bowls, again, the PM's mass helps.
    The DVR takes up much less space, but the cost is reduced mass. I have been able to turn some 19" deep HF, but it takes longer on the DVR than it takes on PM since I have to take lighter cuts during hollowing. I also turn lots of natural edge/crotch bowls, and I have to start out much slower on the DVR than I do on the PM. Again, it's a mass difference.
    I don't have a dedicated shop, the SWMBO allows me two bench areas against the walls in the garage. The DVR lets me do most everything I can do on a PM, but the PM lets me do things a little bit faster. Faster means cleaner cuts and less sanding time.

    So, decide what you want to turn, figure out how much space you want to devote to the lathe and then see if you can try them out - checkout your local AAW chapter - most clubs have members who own these lathes, and most people are willing to 'help' you make up your mind, so ask if you can come over to watch/try their lathe.

    Hope this helps,
    Cheers, :cool2:
     
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  16. robo hippy

    robo hippy

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    The DVR I turned on was the 110 volt version, and though it had a surprising amount of torque for its size, it did not compare to the PM.

    Yes, there are 5 preset speeds, and you can button up or down slowly to other speeds. I find the variable speed on the PM and my Robust to be much simpler. No two pieces of wood are the same, and you can fine tune the lathe speed to whatever you need. My first lathe had 4 pulleys, and I learned to work with it, but the variable speed was so much better. Some thing you don't really apreciate unless you use it all the time and switch back.

    I have never had a lathe with a speed readout. Learned to do without it, and have no need for it now.

    The DVR is a fine mid size lathe, just not for me.

    robo hippy
     
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  17. MichaelMouse

    MichaelMouse

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    You no doubt noticed that the PM was bolted to its stand? That's where the "mass" comes in. Bolt more to a nice rigid lathe if you feel it necessary, but it shouldn't EVER be unless you like to abuse your machine. Turn slowly so that the imbalance won't find any gap to exploit and beat your bearings to death. If there's no flex in the stand or mount, you should have no problems with tool control either.

    Fast doesn't make smooth surfaces. Good edges presented properly do. Faster is more dangerous to you and more likely to damage your machine, if that's what you're after. If you have to slow your feed rate on a high-torque motor like the DVR, you're doing neither yourself nor the machine any favors.

    I've turned on big old iron, and I'm turning on the 3000 now. The 3000 is great, but that's because I learned to turn between the time I used the big PMs and Deltas and now.
     
  18. Curtis Fuller

    Curtis Fuller

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  19. LHauch

    LHauch

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    MM,

    My main point was to think about what you want to turn, then look for the best match for the job as well as your available space. If you only want to turn pens, a PM is way overkill. :cool2:
    Once you understand what you want to do, and know any limitations you may have, the nlook/try the options out there.
    The PM, DVR, Robust and Jets (and others) are all fine machines, with Pros & Cons for each.

    I agree with your other points. Unfortunately, I have no room for a dedicated, free-standing lathe. My only option was to bolt the lathe to a 400lb. multi-purpose workbench. I have tried to add as much mass as possible to the workbench, but there are time when I can get some vibrations at low speeds (under 1000RPM) with pieces of wood that are round, thin (under .25" thick) but have different densities from side to side. When I turn on the PM, I can get to 1000 RPM with no issues. I understand the cause of the vibration there is just nothing I can do about it - I have no more room for lead, sand or anything else. (I generally use the '6000 < (dia. x RPM) < 9000' rule of thumb for nicely balanced pieces.)

    I do keep my tools sharp, and re-sharpen as soon as I either feel the cut change, or see tear-out starting to happen. I agree that sharp tools, good technique and understanding feed & speed are more important than just the rotational speed. (While I do use the 80-grit gouge once in a while, typically I can start sanding at either 180 or 220.)

    Cheers,
     
  20. Mark Warden

    Mark Warden

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    If you do get a DVR I would see how much Alan would charge to build a stand that looks like a sweet setup:cool2:
     

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