Nova G3 Worm Screw

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by Lamar Wright, Sep 7, 2017.

  1. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

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    Hello turners, I'm using my Nova chuck's worm screw to mount my bowl blanks (green and kiln dried wood) nothing over 6" OSD. My problem is unscrewing the bowl from the worm screw when turning the bowl around to work the inside of the bowl. The bowl is so tight on the screw I have a hard time trying to take it off. I do use one drill size smaller that the worm screw to mount the bowl. I do tighten the bowl all the way on the screw to where the bowl face is touching the jaws on the chuck. I don't use a spacer on the worm screw. Should I ? Also should I try using paraffin wax on the worm screw? I just don't won't the bowl blank flying off. I guess my question is how do you mount the blank to the worm screw to where it is not chore to take off. Several times I've had to loosen the worm screw from the chuck and put the bowl in a vice and use a wrench to unscrew the worm screw. I don't like to do that. Has anyone had this problem? I am really enjoying turning bowls and getting a lot of practice...... Thanks and Happy turning.
     
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  2. charlie knighton

    charlie knighton

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    to not waste as much wood.....wood screw should go into the inside of bowl....turn outside and tendon on bottom....unless u are turning inside and outside from screw chuck without reversing.....how many rpm are u turning @.....might slow it down except for finishing cuts......
     
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  3. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    I use a 10mm bit with the oneway worm screw when I use one.
    ( mostly I start between centers using a spur drive)

    I don't use a spacer. Smaller bowls can be harder to unscrew than larger ones.
    Also be sure to soften the rim edge so it is not sharp. This is where you grab to unscrew.

    I with the lathe at real low speed I let the bowl thread into screw letting go before it is totally tight.
    I stop the lathe, lock the spindle, tigthen the bowl on the screw fairly hard so the wood is tight against the tops of the jaws.

    After turning the outside and the tenon, I lock the spindle and unscrew the bowl.
    This can take a bit of effort.

    You can make a strap wrench like ones use to open jars or remove oil filters.
     
  4. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    It doesn't need be so tight ... use a larger size drill. This will vary with wood species. Very hard wood may require going up in hole size a couple steps more than in medium wood. If it's hard to screw on, it will always be harder to unscrew. Wax on the screw is OK, but don't use it as a substitute for drilling a hole that is reasonable. The face should be flattened before drilling the hole so that the chuck jaws will contact the wood all the way around. I don't see any reason to need a spacer unless the bowl is shallow. If you aren't using tailstock support, you should. With a firm, but not excessively tight screw in the wood combined with tailstock support there should be no reason that sound wood will come off while turning. If you are at the point where you are still getting catches then slow the speed down and work on technique, paying attention to tool presentation and sharpness ... often a catch happens when a tool is dull and excessive force is used to make the tool continue cutting. Pay attention to how much force you are applying and if it is more than a few ounces, the tool is dull.

    When you feel confident enough to mount the blank between centers for initial shaping of the outside and creating a tenon I suspect that you may find yourself using the woodworm screw less and less.
     
  5. Steve Nix

    Steve Nix

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    Try putting a little wax on the worm screw before attaching to your blank, make it a lot easier.
     
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  6. Bill Blasic

    Bill Blasic

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    Now for me that is a good thing. I start all my bowls with the Nova screw and it holds very well. It bothers me not to have to take the screw out of the chuck to take it off as I have to take the screw out of the chuck anyway to mount the bowl for the second side. A pair of water pump pliers makes it easy to remove the screw from the wood quickly. I know the pros say the Oneway screw is very good but I have tried most and the Nova is by far the best for me (besides that the first time I used a Oneway screw it snapped, that piece went into the fire place as I wasn't going to mess around trying to get the broken screw out).
     
  7. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

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    I see that I'm not alone on this issue. Thank you all so much for your replies and what Al said about a strap wrench was another idea that I had though of. With your ideas I'll be able to sort this out for a more easier way to remove the worm screw. Happy turning!
     
  8. Bernie Hrytzak

    Bernie Hrytzak

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    When I couldn't remove the blank from the screw, I used to "unchuck" the screw and try to mount the blank tenon in a large vise on my bench and then use a large crescent wrench on the screw to back it out., this worked but was clumsy and time consuming. One day, realized since I already have the tenon, why not chuck it up on the lathe, lock the spindle, and use the crescent wrench to back out the screw. Works like a charm.
     
  9. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    Learned something today. Would like to turn some plates or shallow bowls. Thanks, charlie.
     
  10. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

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    Another great idea Bernie, thanks very much! Happy turning
     
  11. Gerald Lawrence

    Gerald Lawrence

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    As a modification of this put the screw in a vice (metal) and then can easily grasp the piece with both hands and a little more ergonomic .
     
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  12. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    Depending on the model of lathe you have locking the spindle should provide you
    with (2) hands free to grasp the rim of the bowl and unscrew the blank. If you don't
    have a locking spindle and you have a chuck that used Tommy bars to open and close
    the chuck, you can use a longer Tommy bar and place a block of wood on the lathe ways
    and brace the Tommy bar against the wood block which "locks" the spindle and provides
    you the ability to unscrew the blank from the screw. You can also follow the same process
    using the spanner wrench that fits the hex nuts on other types of chucks if you don't have
    a locking spindle. If you have a 2nd adjustable chuck you can also insert the 2nd chuck into
    the recess or onto the tenon that you turned on the wood blank, this will provide several ways
    to apply pressure onto the blank to unscrew it from the worm screw. An adjustable strap wrench
    will also work if you have one big enough to go around the wood blank.

    Drilling a larger hole is an easy solution, you just need to start at the smaller diameter and work
    your way up to the correct diameter for the hardness of the wood.
     
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  13. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

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    Another good idea Gerald!
     
  14. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

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    All good ideas Mike. I have a Delta lathe and it does have a lock. Thanks and happy turning.
     
  15. Leo Van Der Loo

    Leo Van Der Loo

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    I use a faceplate most times, but sometimes do use the Oneway woodworm screw, normally use a 11/32 drill or ⅜ if hard wood,

    The #3 jaws are used for a wider backing of the wood against the chuck, making that more stable than using a small jaw set, with a small turning the shrinking wood will get the wood pretty tight, and sometimes I have to use my pipe strap wrench, Pipe strap wrench.jpg , but larger ones are normally easy enough to unscrew.

    Couple of pictures here that show the use of a Oneway woodworm screw in a 15” blank, a very good way to hold blanks that are solid wood. they do come in both RH and LH tread and also extra long 2”.

    Cherry blank.jpg Woodworm screw.jpg cutting.jpg
     
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  16. Michael Mills

    Michael Mills

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    You don't say what size bit you are using but Nova suggest 9/32 or 7mm for soft wood and 5/16 or 8mm for hard wood. I did oil or wax the woodworm screw first.
     
  17. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

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    Hi Leo, thanks for your information and tips. Did you purchase your pipe strap wrench from one of the big box hardware stores? Happy turning!
    Hi Mike, I use a 9/32 drill bit on all wood. I got some paraffin wax today and I have plenty of oil and I will arm myself with a strap wrench for small bowls 5" or less. Hope I can find a long enough strap wrench. The wrench could probably modified to add more strap material by sewing it on for larger bowls? Thanks Mike and happy turning!
     
  18. Leo Van Der Loo

    Leo Van Der Loo

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    Lamar I’ve had my pipe strap wrench for a long time, used in my previous life :), I would try eBay, or a professional tool supply store.

    Mine has a thick woven cotton (I think) strap that will go around about an 8” pipe/bowl, and yes I could replace with a longer strap if needed
     
  19. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval

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    This thread reminded me that I have a dedicated, I think Glaser screw chuck. Once I started between centers I have never used it again. Because I almost lost my index finger with the bandsaw, I dont cut my blanks perfectly, so I have to balance them and thats impossible with the screw chuck. I'm negotiating a large order of platters. I think I will cut them in the bandsaw, carefully, then the screw chuck will come in handy, I believe for production turning is a faster option... I used to use a little bit of wax on mine, once in a while one will make you swear a little...
     
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  20. Dean Center

    Dean Center

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    I use a 5/16" bit on all woods for my Nova screw and chucks. Sometimes they won't come off, just as you have found. When this happens, I usually unchuck the screw and get it easily out with a crescent wrench.
     
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