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One way easy core base for a 25" swing lathe

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by Breck Whitworth, Nov 16, 2017.

  1. Breck Whitworth

    Breck Whitworth

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    I am the extremely happy owner of a Robust American Beauty 3 hp lathe. It was my plan to get a one way bowl coring system to use on it, but when I started researching the base needed, I find I am ignorant about whether one way makes a base to fit a 25" swing? I see where they sell a 24" base and then a 26" base. Since they say you need the correct base for the swing of your lathe, will the 24" base work? Any one with experience using this bowl coring system on a robust 25" swing lathe please let me know what I need to do to use this system.
     
    odie and Lamar Wright like this.
  2. Tom Albrecht

    Tom Albrecht

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    Congratulations on the new AB. I am sure you'll love it.

    I have the 24" Oneway coring system bought for my Oneway 24" lathe when I owned it. I now own the 25" AB like yours. I am successfully using my 24" system with new Robust by simply adding a 1/2" round bar to the height adjustment system. The basic cutter height is adjusted by using the supplied round bar stock in the tool post and the tool rest post. Then it is finely adjusted with a lock nut and bolt on the bottom of each post.

    Have you called Oneway and asked them? Surprisingly, they are not averse to answering questions about making their products work on a Robust.

    Unfortunately, the only set-up video that Oneway has available is very dated and of poor video quality.
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2017
  3. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    I can't help with your question, but congratulations on the new lathe. I don't know about the newer Robust AB lathes, but my six year old model that has a slightly different headstock design and the swing is 25½". If the swing on your lathe is the same,it's possible that the 26" coring system might work without modification. Before calling Oneway, measure the actual swing because it might not be exactly 25".
     
  4. john lucas

    john lucas

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    Tom has probably answered your question but it seems to me the best thing to do is call Oneway. They are the experts.
     
  5. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

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    Hi Breck, don't know about the bowl coring system but congratulations on your new AB.
     
  6. William Rogers

    William Rogers

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    I bet you are happy with the AB. Congrats. Best I can do is the tool rest.
     
  7. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    That's a start. :)

    I started with a tool rest and two or three years later I had the rest ... of the lathe.
     
  8. JeffSmith

    JeffSmith

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    I did the same thing, Bill. But mines 6 years old and has the new headstock for the 3 hp motor. Swing is the same at 25-1/2”. I think I got one of the first ones with the new motor/headstock...I ‘d guess the 26” would work, but a call to Oneway should confirm.
     
  9. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    When I bought my lathe, Brent told me that they were about to make a design change to accommodate larger frame size higher efficiency motors. So mine is near the tail end of the design with the larger handwheel.
     
  10. Breck Whitworth

    Breck Whitworth

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    Bill I was so used to my pm3520B the only thing I didn't find better on my AB was the (I assume is the new smaller hand wheel) you were talking about. It is not easy to spin like the one on the pm. I fixed the problem, if I can even call it a problem by to attaching a strip of adhesive 150 grit sand paper to the wheel. It works so well now I forget it ever was not easy to spin. I have the 3 hp motor on my beast.
     
  11. Breck Whitworth

    Breck Whitworth

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    About the one way base for bowl coring, I finally called Brent and asked him about it and he told me to call one way and order one especially made for my AB. He said a few other AB owners have told him that was what they had done, and it works well.
     
  12. Tom Albrecht

    Tom Albrecht

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    Wait a minute... What does a "larger frame size higher efficiency motor" have to do with a "larger handwheel"?
     
  13. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Plenty. On the newer design the motor was moved closer to the centerline so that the increased weight wouldn't be cantilevered out as far. Obviously, the large handwheel size wasn't going to work so that is the reason for making it smaller. I have noticed that a number of newer model lathes also have smaller handwheels. The advantage of moving the motor closer to the centerline is that the headstock center of mass will be over the bed. The change in frame size according to Brent IIRC had to do with the phase in of increased energy efficiency regulations.
     
  14. Tom Albrecht

    Tom Albrecht

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    Aha, I thought you guys were talking about the handwheel on the tailstock. Brent continually makes improvements, right after I bought mine he modified the headstock handwheel with engraved indexing numbers (an easy change over), then there was the improved ruler on the tailstock spindle.
     
  15. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    This larger frame size higher efficiency motor standard is really going to be a PITA for older
    existing equipment. Most equipment is engineered with space and material used in an efficient
    manor not allowing for a lot of extra space to work with. The newer motors are physically larger
    and also have a higher cubic inch junction box required for wire fill requirements. Replacing a motor
    that goes bad with an off the shelf replacement will be a nightmare for older equipment going forward.
    On industrial equipment we have been running into this problem for several years now, having to redesign
    existing equipment to accept newer designed motors for replacements.
     
  16. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    Does this make the under the pulley design easier to work with?
     
  17. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Are you asking whether this impacts fixed headstock lathes where the motor is below the bed? I think the answer doesn't depend on where the motor is located as much as how the motor is mounted and the clearance around the motor. If we're talking about replacing an existing motor with one of a larger frame size (the frame size is given on the nameplate) then possible problems include differences in shaft diameter and length, mounting configuration differences (mounting foot size and position or different C-face size), and the differences in overall physical dimensions. We also have to take into account motor movement with the belt in different pulley positions and clearance around the motor for adequate cooling. A motor that is mounted in the open will run cooler than one that is in an enclosure ... a very large enclosure is better than a tiny one.

    I don't know if energy efficiency requirements affects imported machines. I would guess that that there are different requirements for industrial, commercial, and consumer equipment.
     
  18. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    :) is this an argument for turning out doors. :)
     
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  19. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    :D :D :D
     
  20. Breck Whitworth

    Breck Whitworth

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    OK I called one way and they said I can use the 24" base like a few people have already told me it would work. All I need to do is make a minor adjustment. Now I have another question what depth of cores does the one way bowl coring system create, They list the diameters of each knife set but no mention of depth is given and the lady that communicated with me didn't know, go figure. I realize this type system creates a standard shaped core give or take a minor amount of play but I just want to know what depth core will I get from the 16-1/2" knife set on say a 18-1/2 diameter wet block of wood. I know the woodcut creates a 3-1/2" deep core on a 12-1/2 to 13" Diameter
     

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