Protective clothing

Discussion in 'Woodturning Health & Safety' started by Hy Tran, May 15, 2015.

  1. Hy Tran

    Hy Tran

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2012
    Messages:
    181
    Location:
    Albuquerque, NM
    In the privacy of your own shop--what do you wear?

    I wear my safety glasses and a faceshield on top. Sometimes, I wear gloves; sometimes, I wear a face mask (sanding). I almost always also put on a smock to reduce dust on my clothing. Sometimes, I wear socks and croc sandals, rather than shoes.

    Oh, yes, I also put on pants :)

    What do you folks do? Do you have issues tracking dust into the house?
     
  2. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2004
    Messages:
    4,310
    Location:
    Lakeland, Florida
    Home Page:
    My gear is similar

    prescription Safety glasses, face shield,
    Dust mask when sanding or working with dry wood, Keep a fan to move dust way or run the dust collector

    Never wear a glove. Two reasons. 1 my skin will let go of an exposed chuck jaw a glove won't.
    2 I got a bad painful burn from CA glue that wicked under a glove I was wearing about 20 years ago and haven't worn a glove since for turning

    Regarding footwear.
    I often wear sports sandals with good foot support.
    If I were to stand for a long time in crocs my back would tell me about the mistake for days.
     
  3. hu lowery

    hu lowery

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2013
    Messages:
    485
    Location:
    Roseland LA USA
    they call me the streak . . .

    They call me the streak, I'm the fastest thing on two feet!

    Brought back memories of a Ray Stevens song and a girl that wanted me to go streaking with her one time. Not me, never!

    In the shop I have to admit I wear nothing special other than a face shield. Cheap reading glasses under that. Need prescripton safety glasses. I was looking at an apron someone on video, I think Jimmy Clewes, was wearing. It was like a chest protector but dropped down a little lower. I wouldn't mind having an apron like that with a few layers of protection in it.

    Below the waist I don't wear anything resembling protection, jeans and leather lace up shoes. Been looking at a black toe nail on my big toe for months from misjudging how heavy a small piece of wet oak was I noticed might fall on my foot. It landed on my big toe, a little further back and I would have had a broken toe and felt like a real dummy! That wet oak weighed over five pounds.

    I know a lot of master turners use gloves. My old machine shop instructor at the vo-tech would get up out of his grave just to slap me upside the head if I wore gloves around any rotating equipment. If my hands can't take the punishment I need to rethink what I am doing or maybe rig a shield for protection. As often as many of us turn in front of a lathe a thousand to one odds against an accident wearing gloves aren't really good odds. How many times do we turn in a week? No gloves, no long sleeve shirts. If I am cold I turn in a vest.

    Hu
     
  4. john lucas

    john lucas

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2004
    Messages:
    5,829
    Location:
    Cookeville TN USA
    during the summer in my old shop it was simply too hot. Tank top and shorts. Usually wear my tennis shoes because sandals are too uncomfortable after a long period. Hate getting shavings in my shorts but that's the price you pay for working in hot humid Tennessee weather. I wear prescription safety glasses but 99% of what I turn is small so I seldom wear a face shield. Always have shavings in my shoes and socks and tend to track that into the house. I did buy a pair of those funny looking things that go over your socks and shoes but I always forget I have them and never wear them. Now that I'm getting married to a lady that loves a spotless house that may have to change. Heck I may have to strip naked and blow myself off with a hose before coming in the hose. I am living on a lake now, maybe I can put up one of those outdoor showers like they always have to wash yourself off before you go back inside.
    In the winter I have a cheap nylon jacket I wear over what ever warm clothing is needed. It sheds shavings really well and zips up to the neck to stop the shavings. I do have to wear gloves when I work in the winter because it's simply too cold in my shop. I wear tight fitting ones and simply remind myself constantly that I'm wearing gloves and try not to get anywhere near the spinning goods with them. I'm sure that's not the best option but it's either that or don't turn. Cold weather makes my hands hurt. I'm going to try real hard to properly insulate and heat my new shop so that isn't an issue anymore. However money is still an issue so that may not happen.
    I am trying to convince myself to start wearing a dust hood type face shield. I bought one last year but can't stand to wear it. However I'm going to try and persist and maybe i'll get used to it. I've been breathing wood dust for 30 or more years now and it can't be good for you. I have always used a dust collector and often a fan at my back to try and keep the dust at bay.
     
  5. Douglas Ladendorf

    Douglas Ladendorf

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2013
    Messages:
    277
    Location:
    Pennington, New Jersey
    What are the thoughts on close fitting fingerless gloves like Lyle Jamieson wears? Those seem to be useful in some scenarios.

    Doug
     
  6. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2004
    Messages:
    4,310
    Location:
    Lakeland, Florida
    Home Page:
    My thoughts are they are bad idea and unnecessary. For me it is all risk and no benefit.
    It is a personal decision. Lyle and some others think differently.

    It is a what I used to wear about 20 years ago.
    If you mix perspiration and CA glue it HURTS, LEAVES A BIG BLISTER.
    If a chuck corner or edge of a blank catches the material it will likely not let go until the glove is torn from your hand or you stall lathe or maybe the electronics switch off. What damage is done to your hand?

    A bare hand at worst is going to get a cut or a bruise.

    I sand the leading corners of jaws making them less grabby

    We all know we would never ever put our hand into a spinning piece of wood or a chuck except (demonstrate to students)
    We all know we would never drip CA glue on a finger where it can wick under the glove with bare fingers.
    Oddly it did not bond to the skin but it had one heck of an exothermic display.

    I adopted styles of turning that shoot the chips away from me when roughing so don't have anything hitting me.

    If you have some hand issues that make wearing a glove imperative or beneficial. You have a different decision process. Benefits and risk.

    Al
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2015
  7. robo hippy

    robo hippy

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2007
    Messages:
    1,867
    Location:
    Eugene, OR
    I am always in shorts, slip on shoes, and t shirt. When turning I wear safety glasses, and a smock most of the time. Other than that, it depends on what I am doing. When sanding, I have a full hood, not just a big gulp type cone thing, for collecting dust, and there is no need for a dust mask. I always turn green, so no dust protection needed there. If I am turning green, then I do use the hose up close to what I am turning. I do tend to overheat... Anything above 60 degrees makes me sweat. No gloves ever needed because of how I turn.

    robo hippy
     
  8. hu lowery

    hu lowery

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2013
    Messages:
    485
    Location:
    Roseland LA USA
    A great or terrible example depending on how you look at it!



    Doug,

    Lyle made the first good video's I found about turning. I admire him a great deal and have watched those video's over and over. The worn out fingerless gloves with them gaped open around every finger and threads unraveled and the glove material hanging way out on some fingers is impossible to miss. Those fingerless gloves are not safe, in my opinion no fingerless gloves are.

    Most accidents aren't caused by one thing. Usually one unusual thing happens and it is compounded by bad practices that were just fine until that one thing happened.

    To illustrate, smoking is perfectly safe around tanks holding highly flammable and explosive materials. There is a nice layer of steel and maybe liner separating the smoker from the hazardous material. Long before the government stepped in there was still no smoking allowed in these areas. If one thing went wrong, a leak large or small, it could rapidly be compounded by an ignition source nearby. The smoking ban wasn't for routine daily activities but for when things went wrong. The safety rules against wearing gloves are much the same, they are for when things go wrong, although wearing gloves can be the sole cause of some accidents.

    Hu
     
  9. Hy Tran

    Hy Tran

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2012
    Messages:
    181
    Location:
    Albuquerque, NM
    The smock (for me) is to prevent chips/shavings from getting under my shirt, or into my underwear. (I don't turn commando. Don't ask).

    I still get shavings in my hair (what hair I have, anyway).

    The (occasional) gloves are, I think, because I don't know how to duct chips away from the hand pushing the tool on the toolrest. (This is mostly when using the bowl gouge on dry wood, roughing out). I also use gloves when applying CA on pens, but I hear your concerns about rapid exothermic polymerization with CA. I have a box of disposable nitrile gloves that I use for CA glue. For protecting the hand from hot chips, I use relatively form-fitting mesh-back work gloves that I bought from Costco.

    Interesting that most of you (who have responded) don't have anything special for pants or feet.
     
  10. Douglas Ladendorf

    Douglas Ladendorf

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2013
    Messages:
    277
    Location:
    Pennington, New Jersey
    I've heard similar warnings about gloves (fingerless or not) as well as long sleeves. Yet some turners wear fingerless gloves and vendors sell full-sleeved turning jackets. The turning jacket I wear sometimes has full sleeves and tight cuffs. I've never felt a risk with that. Now if there is material hanging off that could catch, as you say is the case with Lyle, then that does seem dangerous no matter what the garment. I don't wear gloves but I think about it every time I turn something very dry and it feels like hot embers hitting my hand.
     
  11. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    8,137
    Location:
    Dalworthington Gardens, TX
    Home Page:
    I like your analogy because denial frequently seems to be the reason for disregarding common sense. But, just like stock prices, past performance is no guarantee of future results. The part that bothers me about this is when somebody who is doing something unsafe tells others that it is perfectly safe because he has not had an accident while turning with gloves. Rotating machinery has absolutely no compassion.
     
  12. hu lowery

    hu lowery

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2013
    Messages:
    485
    Location:
    Roseland LA USA
    annoys me



    Bill,

    It just plain old annoys hell out of me when we can't convince somebody something is unsafe because the person we are talking to sees some respected person doing what they want to do. They can see dozens of people that don't do it but one person setting a bad example they want to follow because it is the easiest or most comfortable path, that is who they will follow. I'm getting inclined to tell them rock'n'roll and please don't carry State Farm insurance.

    I'm very glad that the AAW is starting to require some respect for safety from people giving demo's. It might persuade some of the old guard that they really don't need to keep using bad practices they are teaching to everyone they demo in front of. To be pretty blunt about it, a lot of the unsafe practices came down from the top, the safe practices will need to come down from the top too.

    Hu
     
  13. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    8,137
    Location:
    Dalworthington Gardens, TX
    Home Page:
    I don't know if you intentionally used smoking in your example to make it a double unsafe whammy, but smokers are the poster children for denial. A friend and brilliant engineer at work who was one of the nicest people that I ever knew was a smoker who wasn't interested in quitting. He didn't deny that it was harmful ... for most people, but he figured that he had made it over the hump so to speak ... and therefore was OK to continue. Unfortunately, the other side of the hump wasn't good news. He never got to enjoy a life after retirement.
     
  14. John Torchick

    John Torchick

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2010
    Messages:
    1,135
    Location:
    Southeast Tennessee
    I was around manufacturing for many years and gloves were a no-no around turning machines. I don't ever recall a machinist wearing gloves at any time while working with machinery. They might wear gloves to pick up an object but the gloves were taken off before turning on the machine.
    I wear something comfortable- shoes (no sandals), face mask, ear plugs; I do wear an old hoodie (without the hood) in the winter but pull the sleeves up out of the way. Oh yes, pants and shirt in case you are wondering about the rest of my outfit. I do try to coordinate my outfit as to colors, patterns, etc. :p
     
  15. john lucas

    john lucas

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2004
    Messages:
    5,829
    Location:
    Cookeville TN USA
    Well when I'm rough turning Cherry the shavings hit my left hand and hurt. I often wear a fingerless glove when rough turning because of that. There are positions where I can rotate the gouge or change the angle and avoid this but some cuts are just more efficient so I find the gloves necessary. As I mentioned in another post in the winter my shop is simply too cold and my hands actually hurt so gloves are a necessity if I want to turn. Just like anything else you have to be careful. How many people do you know who have mangled or cut a finger on the lathe who weren't wearing gloves. Accidents happen and we all try to do our best to keep them to a minimum.
     
  16. dbonertz

    dbonertz

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2007
    Messages:
    277
    Location:
    Fort Collins, CO.
    Like it matters but I also wear a glove on my right hand when rough turning the outside of bowls. I rough turn left handed so my right hand is near the flute. My right hand does not go on the blank side of the tool rest. I can direct shavings but it is the junk that comes off that I cannot control. Small bark pieces, if I wasn't able to remove the bark, splinter from hitting a branch pocket, bark inclusion or etc. I don't wear gloves when finish turning, I can feel the cut better without them. It is all in ones perspective. I suppose I rough turn a lot more than most (roughoutbowls.com) so I feel it is safer to not have that pain of trash hitting my bare hand and making me twitch in a cut.

    I wear a face shield, smock, jeans/shorts, always shoes/boots. During the winter I wear a long sleeve shirt with button cuffs if it is really cold but again I don't slow a blank with my hand either - let the lathe do that. During the summer I use those foot covers that John mentioned because I wear shorts and I hate chips in my shoes.

    BTW I only put the above web address, not to advertise, but to head off the potential guy who may take my above statement out of context.
     
  17. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    8,137
    Location:
    Dalworthington Gardens, TX
    Home Page:
    Many years ago I was using some of the screen like sanding cloth with the lathe running. It grabbed a bark inclusion and did a full circle before it slipped out of my hand. The human reflex time is simply way too slow to match the speeds that these sort of things happen. Anyway, the index finger of my right hand was pointed backwards and I knew right away that was not normal. I wasn't wearing a glove or else my whole arm would have been twisted around until the lathe stalled. But, it was interesting that even just holding the sanding screen in what seemed to be a safe way where it would slip out of my fingers turned out to not be safe at all. I learned from the orthopedic surgeon that the fingers are extremely slow to heal and generally never fully recover full functionality. I had no torn ligaments, but even so it took years to regain most of the use of my finger. The recovery was painful.

    There are plenty of ways to deal with hot dry wood chips, shavings, and bark besides wearing gloves. My personal opinion is that fingerless gloves are worse than full gloves for the reasons that Hu stated earlier. As far as being experienced enough to avoid injury while wearing gloves is concerned ... maybe so ... hopefully ... but I don't like the idea of broadcasting it. Even with a disclaimer, it might just be enough assurance to somebody who only thinks that they are skilled enough to do the same thing. The internet is impersonal enough to detach us from emotional involvement, but how about giving the same implied assurance about wearing gloves while turning to friends or relatives?
     
  18. Jeff Gilfor

    Jeff Gilfor

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2012
    Messages:
    115
    Location:
    Tampa, FL
    I am a big fan of 9 or 10 mil thick nitrile gloves. Thick enought to protect. Thin enough to rip if caught. I do not like to get those little cuts and abrasions on my hands, as I am an anesthesiologist by day, and my patients don't appreciate their doc's hands looking like I just overhauled my car's engine.
     
  19. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    8,137
    Location:
    Dalworthington Gardens, TX
    Home Page:
    That might work. I have a bunch of Harbor Freight 5, 7, and 9 mil nitrile gloves that I use when messing with dye and chemicals that can cause severely painful cracking of my fingertips.
     
  20. John Torchick

    John Torchick

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2010
    Messages:
    1,135
    Location:
    Southeast Tennessee
    Nitrile or latex or non-latex gloves might work but I like to err on the side of caution.

    Jeff Gilfor, then you are the ether bunny? :p
     

Share This Page