Protective clothing

Discussion in 'Woodturning Health & Safety' started by Hy Tran, May 15, 2015.

  1. Mark Hepburn

    Mark Hepburn

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    I know we got off on the topic of gloves and my .02 is that I don't wear them when turning. But I really like Jeff's idea of the nitrile gloves (which I use for finishing).

    As to the other safety gear, I just wear the AAW smock I got last year in AZ, shorts and comfortable shoes (and stand on an anti-fatigue mat).

    Just to mention for those who are ambivalent about face protection:

    I was turning a green blank this past Sunday and it blew off the lathe and right into my face shield. Just a bad spot in the blank and it blew right off. I had it mounted on a 6" face plate with 8 stainless steel oval head #12 screws. If I had only been wearing safety glasses I'd have been seriously injured. This was one of those Uvex "bionic", $40 jobs with a polycarbonate lens.

    Just saying, it's cheap insurance and you really get used to it quickly.
     
  2. hu lowery

    hu lowery

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    played a bit with math



    Mark,

    I played around with the math a bit. The surface of a ten inch piece moving at 1000 RPM is going to move five or six feet before a human can react. Even at 200 RPM there is no chance for a person to jerk back. I like the nitrile gloves for finishing but when roughing I have to put a little thought into things to not get beat up by bark and pointy stuff routinely. While the nitrile might tear there is also an excellent chance that it will not tear enough fast enough to not guide a hand into danger since we aren't really resisting movement when turning, we are trying to gently guide the tool.

    I got hit while standing in what is generally considered the safe zone. Same face shield as yours and it rung my bell but did no damage to me or the shield. You know you are used to the shield when you try to wipe your face or drink something with the shield down. It is my #1 piece of safety gear. I would like to add some chest protection, as far as I know none made like I want. I'm thinking some type of small trauma plates that overlapped or were layered to allow free movement but would still insure the force of any blow, particularly over the heart, was spread over a wider area. Impacts over the heart sometimes kill people hours later when they think everything is fine.

    The piece blowing up when solidly secured is the kind of thing that it is very difficult or impossible to prepare for. Glad it didn't do you any real damage. No doubt an attention getter at the time! Kinda like an explosion near you in a petro-chem plant, if you hear it, things are all over and you are fine. Takes a few minutes to convince your heart of that!

    Hu
     
  3. Mark Hepburn

    Mark Hepburn

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    Hey there Hu. Been a while since we talked.

    Yes, It was an attention getter for sure. Happened so fast that t was over before I realized it and I had to go poking all over the shop to find the piece! Five or six feet is huge when you think of how fast these things are moving and how slow we humans are.

    Not trying to be funny here, but you could get one of those thin life vests with the snap release for chest protection. Light, cheap and plus they're available in a very stylish fluorescent orange or yellow!

    As to the gloves, I'm still on the fence. I do like the nitrile idea but then I don't really care too much for wearing them for extended period.

    And yes, I still keep trying to drink coffee through that shield. If only it were semi-permeable!!! :D

    Mark
     
  4. Hy Tran

    Hy Tran

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    Chest impact protection

    So, I don't own any chest protective gear. But if you're looking for something to distribute impact, two things come to my mind:

    (1) A fencing vest
    (2) A catcher's chest protector, baseball umpire's chest protector, or paintball chest protector

    Those (esp. (2)) would be relatively easy to find in a sporting goods store, and should be relatively easy to don.

    I do wear safety glasses under the face shield. Sometimes, I forget that I've got the face shield, and try to blow off some chips (and look really stupid :D )
     
  5. Douglas Ladendorf

    Douglas Ladendorf

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  6. Mark Hepburn

    Mark Hepburn

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    The safety glasses idea is a good one Hy. I wear trifocals but have a pair of prescription safety glasses for my occasional offshore trips and otherwise they collect dust. I think I'm going to adopt that idea too (sort of like wearing suspenders and a belt, but your pants don't fall down!)
     
  7. Gerald Lawrence

    Gerald Lawrence

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    Don't really have anything new. I use a Trend shield and have a Bionic for backup when the battery dies. I wear jeans and short sleeved shirt. My smock is old Pharmacist smock with velcro to close the collar and over pockets to keep chips out. From the time I started flat woodworking over 40 years ago have always heard gloves to be a no go. I wear work boots with the jeans over them (just cannot stand chips in my socks). The heavy leather has saved my toes from a few bruises. I have mats at all workstations and then some in the shop.
     
  8. AlanZ

    AlanZ

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    When looking at chest protectors, it's worth checking out martial arts chest guards.
    They are lightweight, and often have only chest and abdomen protective surfaces, with no need for padding in the back area.
     
  9. Hy Tran

    Hy Tran

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    Safety glasses under face shield

    So, most prescription glasses are impact resistant, but do not necessarily meet the ANSI standard for safety glasses. The side shields in safety glasses are important for safety glasses--but less important if you have a face shield.

    For those of us whose regular prescription is relatively mild (not a lot of astigmatism), and whose arms are getting shorter, there are safety "reading glasses" and safety "bifocal reading glasses". Ballistic glasses are apparently more protective against impact.

    At our local club, one of our experienced members recommended both the Uvex and the Elvex brand (under $15 at amazon) for protective ballistic, in bifocal and reading only. I have the Uvex bifocal style.

    Interesting that many of you with industrial experience were taught no gloves. In the environment where I went to school and worked (with high precision machining), we were taught always gloves--in fact, specific types of gloves, both to protect the items being machined from finger oils, and to protect ourselves from the burrs, sharp edges, etc.
     
  10. hu lowery

    hu lowery

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    Thanks for the chest protector ideas!

    All of the ones I am familiar with have merit, some suggestions I will have to look into, not familiar with something like the martial arts equipment or really the sports equipment. I think the flotation vest might be a bit clumsy to turn in, I never fished in them only wearing one while moving. However, the material it is made out of might be ideal to both absorb and spread force. the front of it with maybe a few modifications in the foam might work great. The protectors that must leave you able to move easily are all possibilities too.

    Didn't realize there were so many options out there. Thank you to everyone for your suggestions.

    Hu
     
  11. Mark Hepburn

    Mark Hepburn

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    Mine are ANSI Z-rated, super heavy duty with side shields. I spend some time now and again on offshore platforms and the requirements are very stringent these days. On the gloves, for years on offshore sites and also in the fab yards where I've spent a good bit of time (working up punch lists for galleys and accommodations), gloves were not permitted. Over the last two years, I've found that on more locations they are now required. In fact, I now have a nice collection of very nice gloves courtesy of the yards from Mobile to Ingleside :)

    So I guess the jury is out and this is something that continues to evolve as our understanding of root causes deepens.

    My face shield is a Uvex and I have a Trend but use that mostly when sanding because it's far less comfortable.
     
  12. dbonertz

    dbonertz

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    Gloves are just another tool. If used properly they are safe. If not then it is like misusing any tool, you may get hurt.
     
  13. Hy Tran

    Hy Tran

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    Should your lathe and yourself encounter unexpected turbulence and land in water, your chest protection device also doubles as a flotation device :)
     
  14. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    The padded t-shirts only have polyester batting for filling ... the same thing as in pillows. What is needed to provide any significant chest protection would be something that is hard.

    Regarding the nitrile gloves, I think that if they were grabbed by the chuck or wood, the speed versus the inertia of one's arm wouldn't permit the hand to move before the nitrile was ripped apart. The part that I don't like is sweaty hands since I turn outdoors in hot weather. So far, I have never felt the need to wear gloves and I seem to find a holding position and tool orientation that reduces the problem down to being insignificant. I am also wondering if the surface of the gloves might be too "grabbly" ... not allowing me to glide the tool between my fingers. Thick gloves significantly reduce tactile feedback for tool control. So, I'll just let my hands go au naturel.
     
  15. Dean Center

    Dean Center

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    Jeff,
    Come practice here in Montana. Our patients only care that you get them well under and remember to wake them up.
     
  16. Dean Center

    Dean Center

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    +1
    Last fall I walled off 1/4 of my garage for a turning shop and this year was the first time I turned out there in the winter. I discovered that rough turning green wood in a 50 degree shop was painful as the chips bounced off my hand. I also rough turn the outside of bowls left handed, so my hand doesn't get anywhere near moving objects.

    One surprisingly effective garment I've found is a sweatshirt with the sleeves cut off just above the elbow. It's warm, comfy, cheap, washable, safe, and sheds chips pretty well. If only they came with a fleece lined velcro turtle neck collar, it'd be perfect.
     
  17. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    I thought I was the only one who tried to blow off chips with the face shield down. :eek: As for nitrile gloves, they are tougher than you might think. Get one and try to tear it. I see some brands advertise that you can't stick a dinner fork through it. I'll pass on the gloves completely.
     

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