Safety Part 2

Discussion in 'Woodturning Health & Safety' started by wwlewis, Oct 31, 2011.

  1. wwlewis

    wwlewis

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    I think we need a new thread.

    I have been in engineering and construction for 40 + years and we not only preach safety, we have to live it. In the field, we have tool box meetings before work in the morning to go over any incident in the days before and what we are to expect in the days work.

    Every engineering or construction meeting starts with a safety moment where a safety topic is delivered by one of the participants. (sometimes at random so all attendees come prepared.)

    We started a safety minute with our club (Gulf Coast Woodturners) when I was on the board and sponsor of the safety minute.

    We could do this at national meetings and anytime we do a demo. It sure would reinforce what could happen.

    In large construction projects, the main issues are cranes and ditch work. What is the main issue with wood working? Band saws and table saws are probably up there along with unsupported wood on chucks.

    Today I was trying to core a yellow birch burl and the coring tool continued to catch in a wood defect. The wood came off the chuck and landed (several times) The only thing hurt was my dignity. Face Shield, and standing away from the side of the turning saved a possible bruise.

    I believe we could all do with safety reminders. Knowledge comes from experience, sometimes bad experience.
     
  2. odie

    odie

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    I had a bowl gouge slip off the edge of a diamond hone the other day......made a nice little crescent shaped cut on one of my fingers, ouch! bled a bit! :(

    Don't know what the solution would be.....but, to be more careful, I suppose! :D

    I know they make those "armored gloves", but I don't see myself making the effort to use one of those, even if I had one! :rolleyes:

    ooc
     
  3. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Our club, the Woodturners of North Texas, normally discusses safety issues at the beginning of every meeting and has an "honorary" safety officer of the month -- the award bestowed upon someone who has done some mishap involving poor judgement that resulted in some sort of injury. Occasionally, the bad judgement was exemplary enough to warrant a safety article in the club's newsletter.
     
  4. John Lawson

    John Lawson

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    My club, the Golden Triangle Woodturners (it is clear we must know many people in common) does something similar, though not so formally.
    I do have a question regarding your cutting-edge research: when you confirmed the danger inherent in the BOSSTT, did you shout "Eureka"?
     
  5. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Yep, there is a lot of cross-pollination going on between our clubs.

    The Safety Officer of the Month is not exactly a formal honor bestowed upon the hapless recipient -- it is more like a spontaneous popular acclamation with a good bit of condolences and occasionally some tail twisting.

    I don't recall if it was "Eureka" or something else that I shouted, but I did make a pronouncement regarding my discovery. Some bystanders across the street later said they thought that I might have been speaking in tongues.

    Before going to the ER, my wife would not let me get blood all over her nice new car, so we had to delay while she wrapped some towels around my hand and then stuck it in a big plastic bag. Somehow the story got contorted in the ER and the word going around was that I was the guy who came in carrying my hand in a plastic bag. I guess that this story is a day late -- it would have been more appropriate yesterday.
     
  6. Betty Scarpino

    Betty Scarpino

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    Bill, a fine story told in a lively way, and it held my interest! Maybe what's often missing in safety information is the kind of writing that holds a person's interest. I'd hire you in a flash to oversee safety articles. Well, I guess I have ... I'm looking forward to your promised article.

    Years ago my son Sam, about 12 years old, broke the garage window. Knowing he was responsible for cleaning up the debris, he donned my faceshield and wore long gloves. Passing inspection, he proceeded to pick up the glass. About five minutes later, he appeared at the kitchen door, blood gushing from his upper inner arm. He'd stabbed himself with a long piece of glass caught in the bushes.

    The fire department arrived first, then the ambulance, then a trip to the hospital for a few stitches. Younger brother's only comment when I left to follow the ambulance to the hospital: "Does this mean I have to find my own ride to hockey practice?"


    Betty Scarpino, editor, AW
     
  7. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    Bill,
    Great article on the BOSSTT!!!

    Enjoyed it.

    Your real mistake was ignoring rule number 2:
    Place the grinder as close to the lathe as possible....

    Perhaps I should apply for your assistant. Last month I was packing up after a demo. Putting my tools into the tool roll I've been using for years.
    Handles in the pouches, steel exposed until it's rolled up.
    Slid my thumb across a tool edge. ouch! No stitches but a nasty little reminder to not touch the pointy ends.

    Thanks for sharing your article.
    Al
     
  8. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    :D

    I have managed to "gently" wipe a finger across a freshly sharpened skew while putting it in the tool roll on more than one occasion.

    I think that I may have detected a pattern -- I have had a number of minor cuts when I am not turning, but just tidying up the shop, as if there is no risk involved if I am not actually standing at the lathe and turning.
     
  9. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    OK, here's my story- I was preparing to turn a cork grip for a fly rod. I had put the Jacobs chuck in the headstock, inserted the mandrel and grip, moved up the tailstock and got it snug. I was just getting ready to start the lathe.....it was then that I noticed that I left the chuck key in the chuck! I don't know what would have happened since I was off to the side, but then again, I would rather speculate and not experience a flying key. I think I'll put a red or orange piece of tape on it so it will be more noticable.
     
  10. Gretch Flo

    Gretch Flo

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    My error in judgement ending in stitches

    Took out the old mat of my car on the garage floor, left it there, tripped on it (mistake #1) while taking a small gas tank that I was cleaning up and pouring over some poison ivy adjacent to the garage. Back to the garage and got a little clean gasoline to repeat, and while shaking the can, and not seeing what was below me I tripped on the damn mat again (had a ridge to it) (mistake #2) , fell on my hands and knees, skinned my shins (I was in shorts), felt a slight sting in the back of my calf, and while swearing at the spilled gas on the garage floor continued to take the rest out to the poison ivy. While coming back to the garage I noted blood streaming down the leg into my athletic shoe . I noticed one of the 2 chain saws (with their guards lying beside them) (Mistake#3) that were parallel and between the 2 cars, was turned 60% around. So my fall enabled the mat or the gas can to twist and just fall on my calf when I was "down". My daughter sewed me up (9 stitches) 2 hours later after I examined it in a mirror and knew a "bandaid" wouldn't be enuf. It was over 3" long, gapping about 1/4" and near 1/2" deep with just fat showing. It's been over 3 weeks and is healing but still large scabs and became sore last nite.
    Moral of the story=it's ok to carry extra weight to protect important things like muscles, tendons, nerves,large blood vessels, etc.;) Gretch
     
  11. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Oh, ..... I thought that maybe the moral of the story might have been that there are those days when it is better to stay in bed and pull the covers over your head. :) If only we could get a forecast of the days events ... sigh.
     
  12. odie

    odie

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    Yep......I had the same thoughts!

    Gretch, you were having "one of those days!"

    We all get them.......:D

    ooc
     
  13. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    Gretch, sounds like a real interesting day, to say the least.
     
  14. Thomas Stegall

    Thomas Stegall

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    Safety

    I now stand corrected. As stated earlier, I had previously seen dozens of pros do demos at our local club, and those I did camera work for at the 25th symposium, and had not seen anyone use a face shield. Last night Pascel Oudet did a demo at our club and wore a face shield the throughout the entire demo. He did a great job with the demo and gave more than lip service to the issue of safety.

    Great job Pascel!!!
     
  15. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    Thomas, your post is important for any woodworker. I find myself using the faceshield for things other than turning. Turning- face shield, dust mask, ear plugs. I don't start the lathe without them.
     

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