Safety session at the 2012 AAW Symposium

Discussion in 'Woodturning Health & Safety' started by hockenbery, Sep 23, 2011.

  1. Betty Scarpino

    Betty Scarpino

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2008
    Messages:
    361
    Bill, I appreciate your concern for safety and your personal dedication to safe practices. I've heard that's the case!

    It is my understanding that there is already a requirement at the national AAW conference that demonstrators wear faceshields (or in some cases it's okay to wear safety goggles). I recall a demonstrator orientation in the 1990s that Nick Cook led: One of his stated requirements was that demonstrators wear eye protection. Admittedly the enforcement has not always been at the level it should be, but from what I understand, enforcement is happening now.

    Additionally, enforcement of safety will be ongoing for the tradeshow vendors.

    I cannot speak for local chapters and their policies.

    Personally, I wear a faceshield when demonstrating. Always have.


    Betty Scarpino, editor, AW
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2011
  2. MichaelMouse

    MichaelMouse

    Joined:
    May 16, 2005
    Messages:
    3,540
    Wonder if prevention is being neglected in the endless discussion of protection. The shield protects the eyes. So do glasses. Neither are designed to do more, though they might, under the proper circumstances. Neither give protection to the throat or the major vessels in the neck from flying sharp-edged objects, or other parts. A quick look at the folks behind the plate will give an idea of what it takes to protect the face. A look at the batter and baserunners will show what reasonable head protection looks like.

    All possible collision dangers are less if we turn at moderate rpm. Add the benefit which comes from cutting out of the throw zone, holding the piece between centers and using the rest as a barrier against climb and you have a good SAFETY lesson.
     
  3. Betty Scarpino

    Betty Scarpino

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2008
    Messages:
    361
    Sure, that's always a concern, such as thinking that seatbelts (safetybelts?) are a solution for careless or reckless driving.

    As I stated in my safety editorial in the August issue of AW, I take an ingrained approach to safety within each journal article. The premise is to present safe methods, explaining techniques in depth so that readers understand sound and safe methods and techniques. AAW is dedicated to educating members about woodturning, and of primary importance is safe practices.

    Prevention is not being neglected in the journal, nor is it neglected at symposiums. The outward appearance of demonstrators wearing a faceshield is a visual indication that safety is being paid attention to. Imagine the uproar if that rule were not in place and enforced. Just because that rule is enforced and being discussed, does not mean that prevention is being neglected.

    So, maybe someone should start a thread titled "What's the most unsafe practice you've witnessed"?

    Betty Scarpino, editor, AW
     
  4. MichaelMouse

    MichaelMouse

    Joined:
    May 16, 2005
    Messages:
    3,540
    I was speaking of the drift on this thread, though it recurs as incidental comments in many others. Most unsafe? Spur mounting of rough blanks. Then compounding it by standing in that throw zone when the switch goes to "ON." Never a good time to be there, but initial mount is the worst. I use a pin chuck, where a dismount is for all practical purposes impossible, but my power switch is off the opposite end of the lathe. The bark in that pocket may not be as firm as it looks!

    So easy to avoid a full dismount by tapping your spurs into the bottom of a counterbore. Doesn't have to be more than 1/4 inch deep.

    I used to pull a kid from his time slot on the lathe if he turned on without clearing the throw zone of other people. Same for the one who ripped on the tablesaw without clearing behind!
     
  5. Betty Scarpino

    Betty Scarpino

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2008
    Messages:
    361
    The scariest thing I saw someone do was to take a turned bowl that had a large tenon left on the bottom and try to cut it off using the bandsaw. Yikes! I stopped him just in time. We removed the tenon by reversing the bowl onto the lathe and turning it off. He said he'd seen one of his club members do it this way.

    Betty Scarpino, editor, AW
     
  6. Thomas Stegall

    Thomas Stegall

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2011
    Messages:
    164
    Location:
    Niles, IL
    Monkey see...

    Betty,

    It is for that reason, that I think the concern voiced earlier that demonstrators do influence the behavior of their observers is a valid one. You can see that in the local chapter gallery reviews/show and tells the month after a demo or class has been done. A flood of look-alikes show up.

    In reference to the issue of practices and enforement I do have to say that as someone who volunteered to man the cameras throughout the symposium in St. Paul, that I did not see a single demonstrator ever wear a face mask. Maybe half of the ones I did video for wore safety glasses. The individuals who did not wear safety glasses were those that wear prescription eye glasses, which are not an effective substitute. Ultimately, saftey is not a piece of equipment, but a mindset that involves anticipating and reducing risk when and where possible, peppered with a good deal of common sense.

    Scariest thing I ever saw; working in a custom cabinet shop, guy using a dado blade set up, had his left hand in a typical woodturners over hand position above the blades on the leading edge of a 2 1/2 inch thick piece of wood, right hand pushing the piece through. The wood contacted the dado blade and kicked back a bit and his hand rolled forward turning from palm down to knuckles down into the dado blade. Guy was lucky he retained full use of his hand and was back to work within hours. Lesson learned, it the wood goes....where does your hand go...?
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2011
  7. Joe Greiner

    Joe Greiner

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2006
    Messages:
    1,044
    Location:
    Tallahassee FL
    This is a timely thread.

    I gave a demo, of minimal danger, last week at our WT club. When I put on my face shield anyway, I said, "There are two types of accident: The ones that have already happened, and the ones that are about to happen."
     
  8. Alan Trout

    Alan Trout

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2008
    Messages:
    86
    Location:
    San Antonio Texas
    Home Page:
    I was also at the symposium and I was impressed with the numbers of demonstrators wearing face shields. Just one example was John Jordan. He wore one for every demo and there were plenty in the trade show as well. As far as safety glasses go. I wear script glasses that are safety glasses. Without side shields they look just like any other pair of glasses but are certified as safety glasses including the frames. They have a polycarbonate lenses and in the corner they have a ASTM rating etched into the lens. If you did not look for the etching you would not see it and you could not tell the difference from any other pair of glasses. It is possible that glasses you were looking at were safety glasses and you did not realize it. It is also possible that they were not. Also my optician told me that the only difference between the lenses in my safety glasses and my regular glasses is the etching as both are polycarbonate from the same stock. They do the etching so in case an OSHA inspector could see that the lens met specifications.

    When I do a Demonstration I always were a face shield or out of necessity have my safety glass on at all times with the side shields installed. I always stress the importance of eye/head protection. And quite frankly I can't remember a recent demo that the demonstrator did not at least mention basic safety practices.

    While I am sure that it is not perfect, I think people and demonstrators are much more conscious of safety today than in the past. This thread and discussion is a good demonstration of that safety consciousness.

    Alan
     
  9. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    8,137
    Location:
    Dalworthington Gardens, TX
    Home Page:
    There is one other difference -- Safety glasses must be designed so that the lens can only be popped in and out the front side of the frame. Regular frames are usually the opposite.
     
  10. Gynia

    Gynia

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2004
    Messages:
    165
    Location:
    Milkyway
    The AAW Lathe Safety Guidelines indicates that safety glasses need side shields. Without the side shields the "safety glasses" do not meat the AAW guidelines.
     
  11. Alan Trout

    Alan Trout

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2008
    Messages:
    86
    Location:
    San Antonio Texas
    Home Page:
    Both are true. I was speaking primarily about lens material. I just got back from an eye exam and getting ready to get new lenses for my safety glasses. I just keep the side shields on mine and never take them off. The side shields really keep the dust an debris away from my eyes.

    By the way prescription safety glasses are dirt cheap. My last set cost me $85 from Sam's with bifocal. My next set of lenses I am going to do progressive with AR and scratch coating as I like the coatings as it really seems to help my close up vision. This set of lenses will be about $90 but that is still cheap for something to protect your eyes.

    Alan.
     
  12. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    8,137
    Location:
    Dalworthington Gardens, TX
    Home Page:
    That is a very good common sense recommendation, but not a rule. My previous post was about one of the legal requirements.
     
  13. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    8,137
    Location:
    Dalworthington Gardens, TX
    Home Page:
    Speaking of that, my employer sold prescription safety glasses in the plant safety shop for only twenty dollars. A lot of cheap engineers got their eye-wear prescriptions filled there even though they never ventured out to the assembly line. The glasses were a perfect complement to the engineer fashion statement which included pocket protector and slide rule on belt.

    And, no, I was not one of those who did (I did not wear glasses then). :D
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2011

Share This Page