Sanding options?

Discussion in 'Newbie' started by Regis Galbach, Sep 25, 2017.

  1. Regis Galbach

    Regis Galbach

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    Mount Juliet, TN
    I'm trying a new style of bowl and can use some tips on how to sand this (and keep all my fingers). If I glue a strip of sand paper (each grit) to a flat stick, It would last about 3 seconds. I have wrapped sandpaper around a stick with a little success but, there must be a better method.. I'm sure some have overcome this before.

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    I would like to get this bottom somewhere near finished before turning it around.

    Thanks for any tips,
    Regis
     
  2. John Torchick

    John Torchick

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    When I built custom fishing rods, I made a reamer for the inside of the grips to open them up for the blank. Use cloth backed sandpaper wrapped in a spiral. Paper backed last about three milliseconds.
     
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  3. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    1. I would sand the four corner pieces with the lathe not running.
    I don't have the sanding skill to not round over the lead edge with the lathe running.
    A soft foam disc will work best. Also a 3" disc on a 2" pad might give nice results.

    With the lathe not running, I would sand with an angle drill using 2" or 3" disks then do the rest by hand sanding with a sanding glove.
    This is a Velcro glove that I can stick discs to. A disc around a finger should reach where the discs on the drill don't.

    2. Another option is to glue wastblocks on the four faces. The whole turning is in the round easy to sand and turn. When finished Cut off waste blocks band sawing along the glue lines.
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2017
  4. Dean Center

    Dean Center

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    Regis,
    Other than "I wouldn't put my fingers in there" and suggesting power sanding the bowl bottom, I don't have any additional thoughts.

    However, if you will pardon me for overstepping, I would suggest your tenon is not as securely made as it might be, assuming I'm seeing it correctly. The place where the bottom of the blank and the tenon come together should be clean and sharp for the jaws to get a secure hold. The bottom of the blank should be flat where the tops of the jaws contact it, as well. If I've misinterpreted or stepped on toes, I apologize.
     
  5. Zach LaPerriere

    Zach LaPerriere

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    I think option #2 that Al mentioned is by far the easiest route. Sanding under lathe power is so much more efficient. If you have enough wood, just make the piece whole with the round included and then cut off the 4 square sides after lathe sanding. Careful how you remove the 4 square sides, especially if you opt for a table saw and VERY careful if you go down the dangerous road of cutting with a chop saw.

    The safest way to cut those four corners would be with the bandsaw and some sort of jig that holds the round piece securely. Then sand with a belt sander: could be a stationary belt sander if you have one, or the old trick of handheld belt sander clamped to a bench or improvised bench in lieu of a stationary belt sander. Watch the fingers.
     
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  6. john lucas

    john lucas

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    When I've done square pieces that were going to be dangerous to sand I glue scrap wood on with a paper joint. That makes it very easy to remove afterwords using a knife that I drive through the joint. Drive sounds harsh it's really just a tap and then the joint starts to seperate. I use White Vinegar to clean off any glue residue.
     
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